love
money
death
love

“I should never have thought she was a girl to fall in love with.”

— Middlemarch

And she shut her eyes not to see it, and was happy in the movements of love.

— The Golden Notebook

“I never shall be good for anything, Mary, if you will not say that you love me—if you will not promise to marry me—I mean, when I am able to marry.”

— Middlemarch

The lad loves Mary, and a true love for a good woman is a great thing, Susan.

— Middlemarch

In all disputes,——male or female,——whether for honour, for profit or for love,—it makes no difference in the case;—nothing is more dangerous, madam, than a wish coming sideways in this unexpected manner upon a man: the safest way in general to take off the force of the wish, is, for the party wished at, instantly to get up upon his legs—and wish the wisher something in return, of pretty near the same value,——so balancing the account upon the spot, you stand as you were—nay sometimes gain the advantage of the attack by it.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

‘ “Who hast brought into unity those who were sundered, and hast ordained for them an indissoluble bond of love” — how profound these words are, and how well they correspond to what one feels at this moment!’ thought Levin.

— Anna Karenina

Now still

As birds they keep their former eloquence,

Their endless raucous chattering, as each

Indulges in her passionate love of speech.

— Metamorphoses

We traveled very leisurely, having more than a week to reach Wace, Continental Divide, where she passionately desired to see the Ceremonial Dances marking the seasonal opening of Magic Cave, and at least three weeks to reach Elphinstone, gem of a western State where she yearned to climb Red Rock from which a mature screen star had recently jumped to her death after a drunken row with her gigolo.

— Lolita

But while, an hour after his awakening, he was giving instructions to the barber to see that his stiffly brushed hair should not become disarranged on the journey, he thought of his dream again, and saw once again, as he had felt them close beside him, Odette’s pallid complexion, her too thin cheeks, her drawn features, her tired eyes, all the things which—in the course of those successive bursts of affection which had made of his enduring love for Odette a long oblivion of the first impression that he had formed of her—he had ceased to notice since the early days of their intimacy, days to which doubtless, while he slept, his memory had returned to seek their exact sensation.

— In Search of Lost Time

He had heard that women often love unattractive, simple people, but he did not believe it, because he judged by himself, and he could only love beautiful, mysterious and special women.

— Anna Karenina

Anna obviously admired her beauty and youth, and before Kitty could recover she felt that she was not only under her influence but in love with her, as young girls are capable of being in love with older married ladies, Anna did not look like a society lady or the mother of an eight-year-old son, but in the litheness of her movements, the freshness and settled animation of her face, which broke through now as a smile, now as a glance, would have looked more like a twenty-year-old girl had it not been for the serious, sometimes sad expression of her eyes, which struck Kitty and drew her to Anna.

— Anna Karenina

But there is another woman in me, I’m afraid of her — she fell in love with that man, and I wanted to hate you and couldn’t forget the other one who was there before.

— Anna Karenina

Rosamond, in fact, was entirely occupied not exactly with Tertius Lydgate as he was in himself, but with his relation to her; and it was excusable in a girl who was accustomed to hear that all young men might, could, would be, or actually were in love with her, to believe at once that Lydgate could be no exception.

— Middlemarch

I want love and there is none.

— Anna Karenina

From the moment of Anna’s love for him, he had considered his own right to her unassailable.

— Anna Karenina

In the castle there was a widow, lovelier of body than any other woman in the world, with whom the Marquis Azzo was madly in love.

— The Decameron

‘The young men will come to us because they love games of strength, and we’ll be able to choose the ones who are sound and suitable.’

— Children of Gebelawi

He doesn’t believe in my love for my son either, or else he despises (how he always did snigger at it), he despises this feeling of mine, but he knows that I won’t abandon my son, I cannot abandon my son, that without my son there can be no life for me even with the one I love, but that if I abandon my son and run away from him, I’ll be acting like the most disgraceful, vile woman —  he knows that and knows I wouldn’t be able to do it.

— Anna Karenina

Lo! ye believers in gods all goodness, and in man all ill, lo you! see the omniscient gods oblivious of suffering man; and man, though idiotic, and knowing not what he does, yet full of the sweet things of love and gratitude.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

And so it was that even at that time, when Ulrich became a mathematician, there were people who were prophesying the collapse of European civilisation on the grounds that there was no longer any faith, any love, any simplicity or any goodness left in mankind; and it is significant that these people were all bad at mathematics at school.

— The Man Without Qualities

For the first time questions came to him about the possibility of his wife falling in love with someone, and he was horrified at them.

— Anna Karenina

Ulrich, who now wanted to say something intelligible, took the opportunity to point out in passing that, after all, love too was one of the religious and dangerous experiences, since it lifted people out of the arms of reason and set them afloat with literally no ground under their feet.

— The Man Without Qualities

So I shall always love you.

— In Search of Lost Time

What’s all this love of arguing?

— Anna Karenina

You must understand that I love two beings — equally, I think, but both more than myself — Seryozha and Alexei.

— Anna Karenina

No, these were not the choking sighs of joy he knew so well, that she would utter in the act of love-making, nor the tender cooing of the dove, nor the little shrieks of laughter.

— Zorba the Greek

Both men acted as her guardians against all violence from outside; and with their instinctive good humor and their innocent love of fun, for her, not naturally very sociable, they provided a substitute for the company of friends her own age.

— History

All her life of love, all her life of torment—ah, almighty God! it had lasted no more than a second….

— Zorba the Greek

His love touched his wife’s heart—

How different from his!—and she recalled

Her own deserted father far away.

— Metamorphoses

The little phrase continued to be associated in Swann’s mind with his love for Odette.

— In Search of Lost Time

You don’t love your mother.

— Anna Karenina

Him who revealed

And brought to ruin the love she hoped to hide

She punished with a love as ruinous.

— Metamorphoses

Not as I’d have wanted to love, but I do love him, and Anna did not love hers.

— Anna Karenina
money

‘I’m earning her a lot of money.’

— The Golden Notebook

‘Money’s not the point,’ said Molly.

— The Golden Notebook

They had made a voluntary confession, and consequently Rinaldo’s horse, clothing and money were restored to him, and all he lost was a pair of garters, which the robbers were unable to account for.

— The Decameron

Standing at his desk, he inspected the money once more, then put it very carefully into a drawer, where it would probably be buried until the day Father Carp and Father Polycarp, the two village priests, came to bury him, to the indescribable joy of his daughter and son-in-law and, even, maybe, of the captain who claimed to belong to the family.

— Dead Souls

It must be said though that the ladies were not money-mad and the fault lies with the word “millionaire.”

— Dead Souls

But the fact is our ancestor has cut himself off in his house, and the Trustee of his estate has taken its money for himself, except what he gives to the chief to protect him; and Zonfol, chief of Gebel’s people, takes his share and buries it in his stomach, as if Gebel had never been, as if he hadn’t taken the eye of his friend Daabas for the eye of poor Kaabelha.

— Children of Gebelawi

He encourages her, with all the thoughtlessness of youth; while Mrs. Boothby, neglected by her hard-drinking money-loving husband, conceives a powerful but secret passion for the good-looking youth.

— The Golden Notebook

Whereupon the two brothers made all necessary arrangements, using his own money to see that he had an honourable funeral, and sending news of his death to the friars and asking them to come that evening to observe the customary vigil, and the following morning to take away the body.

— The Decameron

He stretched out his hand and I gave him a cigarette—he only smoked when I was at the village and would say, ‘we’re burning the government’s money.’

— Season of Migration to the North

I didn’t have enough money to go to America.

— Journey to the End of the Night

And here I’ve worn you all out, and we’re spending money …

— Anna Karenina

For my practice I had found a small apartment at the edge of the “Zone,” from which I had a good view of the embankment and the workman who’s always standing up top, looking at nothing, with his arm in a big white bandage, the victim of a work accident, who doesn’t know what to do or what to think and hasn’t enough money to buy himself a drink and fill his mind.

— Journey to the End of the Night

And on the other…’ (he faltered) ‘hand, its a way for the district coterie to make a little money.

— Anna Karenina

And you must ride over to Mary, and ask the child what money she has.

— Middlemarch

‘I also came to bring you money, since nightingales aren’t fed on fables,’ he said.

— Anna Karenina

There’s nowhere to get the money to pay.

— Pedro Páramo

None of them had had a holiday in years, and they were all permanently short of money, and miserable bickering went on about sixpences and shillings.

— The Golden Notebook

I sent him there on urgent business, and he’d just gone through my money, lived with some cabaret tart, and now comes back twelve days late.

— Zorba the Greek

In a word, the whale was seized and sold, and his Grace the Duke of Wellington received the money.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

But who’s to say I’m not more like God himself than old Pappa Stephanos, who spends his days and nights going down on his knees, and collecting money?

— Zorba the Greek

It was the idea of getting Bulstrode to apply some money to a public purpose—some money which he had thought of giving me.

— Middlemarch

Will had given a disinterested attention to an intended settlement on a new plan in the Far West, and the need for funds in order to carry out a good design had set him on debating with himself whether it would not be a laudable use to make of his claim on Bulstrode, to urge the application of that money which had been offered to himself as a means of carrying out a scheme likely to be largely beneficial.

— Middlemarch

Give me some money!

— Anna Karenina

His brother borrowed money for him, the princess advised leaving Moscow after the wedding, Stepan Arkadyich advised going abroad.

— Anna Karenina

Money trickled in irregularly from her only novel, Frontiers of War, once a best-seller, which still earned just enough for her to live on.

— The Golden Notebook

My diploma in my pocket made a big bulge, much bigger than my money and my papers.

— Journey to the End of the Night

On seeing that he was a merchant, who was probably carrying a certain amount of money with him, these men resolved to rob him at the earliest opportunity.

— The Decameron

Then I’ll find any fellow who looks a bit like the photo, dress him up the same, give him some money and tell him: ‘So-and-so Street, such-and-such a number, go and see Miss What’s-it and make violent love to her.

— Zorba the Greek

Jonah argued that men liked to make a surprise of their wills, while Martha said that nobody need be surprised if he left the best part of his money to those who least expected it.

— Middlemarch

Then again it was a continually repeated shock, disturbing Lydgate’s esteem, that the Vicar should obviously play for the sake of money, liking the play indeed, but evidently liking some end which it served.

— Middlemarch

I have intelligence and the education and the background—all I need is the money.

— The Golden Notebook

Then he violently flung on the counter almost all the scant money he had in his pocket; while his anger tempted him to knock over the counter and the tables and to behave not like an ally but like an invader and a murderer.

— History

The other business — obtaining the money — met with obstacles in the same way.

— Anna Karenina
death

“A clear test”, he said,

“Shall prove if this be god or mortal man

And certify the truth”, and planned for me,

At dead of night, when I was sunk in sleep,

Death unforeseen—so would he test the truth.

— Metamorphoses

In the final period before her death she used to suffer from severe attacks of depression.

— Season of Migration to the North

‘What a terrible death!’ said some gentleman passing by.

— Anna Karenina

Agafya Mikhailovna, speaking of an old man who had died, said: ‘Well, thank God, he took communion, got anointed, God grant everybody such a death.’

— Anna Karenina

But his fears were such as belong to a man who cares to maintain his recognized supremacy: the loss of high consideration from his wife, as from every one else who did not clearly hate him out of enmity to the truth, would be as the beginning of death to him.

— Middlemarch

He had always been afraid of life, and now he attached his fear to something different, to death, to his blood pressure, just as for forty years he had attached it to the peril of not being able to finish paying for the house.

— Journey to the End of the Night

I believe that death caught her unawares, perhaps when she had fallen into one of those spells she had been prone to for some time.

— History

With death?

— The Book of Disquiet

Within are shabby shelves, ranged round with old decanters, bottles, flasks; and in those jaws of swift destruction, like another cursed Jonah (by which name indeed they called him), bustles a little withered old man, who, for their money, dearly sells the sailors deliriums and death.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

‘Do you allow us to be your heirs, or will you punish us in your death as you punish us in your life?

— Children of Gebelawi

His death showed that the gods were still able to fight their own battles.

— Things Fall Apart

Exhausted then and dying, these few words

She forced herself to murmur: “By our vows

Of wedlock, by the gods of home and heaven,

By my deserts, if I have well deserved,

By my death’s cause, my own still-living love,

I beg you, I implore you, not to take

Zephyr to be your wife in place of me.”

— Metamorphoses

I remembered that the news of my mother’s death had reached me nine months ago and had found me drunk and in the arms of a woman.

— Season of Migration to the North

The death of so young a child was just an accident in her opinion, not the same as a normal death, which might have given her food for thought.

— Journey to the End of the Night

In such an hour the mind does not change its lifelong bias, but carries it onward in imagination to the other side of death, gazing backward—perhaps with the divine calm of beneficence, perhaps with the petty anxieties of self-assertion.

— Middlemarch

Several times in the course of a year I would hear my grandfather tell at table the story, which never varied, of the behaviour of M. Swann the elder upon the death of his wife, by whose bedside he had watched day and night.

— In Search of Lost Time

The strongest and most reliable hold which the ship has upon the whale when moored alongside, is by the flukes or tail; and as from its greater density that part is relatively heavier than any other (excepting the side-fins), its flexibility even in death, causes it to sink low beneath the surface; so that with the hand you cannot get at it from the boat, in order to put the chain round it.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Bodies I saw thrown by the temple doors;

Before the altars, even, to put the gods

To greater shame, some hanged themselves, and fled

By death the fear of death, and called their fate

That came uncalled.

— Metamorphoses

It’s like keeping a man condemned to death for months with a noose around his neck, promising him maybe death, maybe mercy.

— Anna Karenina

Death is the least thing I can suffer.

— Children of Gebelawi

Parody of silence and death.

— Lolita

If your death was the death of nature, go in peace.

— Things Fall Apart

He was drinking himself to death, so Jimmy said; but I think this was put in simply to round off the picture; because he would also show us poems written by the old man; and he was probably secretly very proud of him.

— The Golden Notebook

The Catholic Church made a grave mistake in threatening this man with death and forcing him to recant, instead of exterminating him without more ado.

— The Man Without Qualities

The people were so worried and afraid that they forgot about the death of Gebelawi and the murder of Saadallah.

— Children of Gebelawi

Though the girls have gone to specialists, a lack of sexual knowledge has produced the horrifying results of death in .2 per cent of the cases and serious illness in 2.5 per cent.

— The Sound of the Mountain

She suspected that her uncle’s scheme was disapproved by Mr. Casaubon, and this made it seem all the more opportune that a fresh understanding should be begun, so that instead of Will’s starting penniless and accepting the first function that offered itself, he should find himself in possession of a rightful income which should be paid by her husband during his life, and, by an immediate alteration of the will, should be secured at his death.

— Middlemarch

But the intense desire remained that the will of God might be the death of that hated man.

— Middlemarch

From her mouth bubbled a sound very like a death rattle.

— Pedro Páramo

When close to the whale, in the very death-lock of the fight, he handle his unpitying lance cooly and off-handedly, as a whistling tinker his hammer.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

But the more he strained to think, the clearer it became to him that it was undoubtedly so, that he had actually forgotten, overlooked in his life one small circumstance — that death would come and everything would end, that it was not worth starting anything and that nothing could possibly be done about it.

— Anna Karenina

It bores me to death.

— The Man Without Qualities

But the moment Françoise herself was near me, some demon would urge me to try to make her angry, and I would avail myself of the slightest pretext to say to her that I regretted my aunt’s death because she had been a good woman in spite of her absurdities, but not in the least because she was my aunt; that she might have been my aunt and yet have seemed to me so odious that her death would not have caused me a moment’s sorrow—statements which, in a book, would have struck me as inept.

— In Search of Lost Time