love
money
death
love

You don’t love me, you love another woman!

— Anna Karenina

I know very well how you love her.

— The Recognition of Śakuntalā

He bullied the animal terribly, teaching it all kinds of tricks, and reducing it to such a state that the poor beast howled for hours on end when Kolya was away at school and, when he came back, squealed crazily with delight, stood on its hind legs, lay down and pretended to be dead, and so on, repeating all the tricks it had been taught without being ordered to, just out of overwhelming gratitude and love for its master.

— The Brothers Karamazov

“Oh, I love artistic people,” replied the lady in pink.

— In Search of Lost Time

You and he have fallen in love with each other, that I know.

— The Man Without Qualities

Though for the whole evening (lately she had acted the same way towards all young men) she had unconsciously done everything she could to arouse a feeling of love for her in Levin, and though she knew that she had succeeded in it, as far as one could with regard to an honest, married man in one evening, and though she liked him very much (despite the sharp contrast, from a man’s point of view, between Levin and Vronsky, as a woman she saw what they had in common, for which Kitty, too, had loved them both), as soon as he left the room, she stopped thinking about him.

— Anna Karenina

And Jove replied: ‘The child is yours and mine,

Our common care and love.

— Metamorphoses

The human race does not accept its prophets and its prophets are slain, but men love their martyrs and honor those who have been slain.

— The Brothers Karamazov

He didn’t mention the word love.

— A Sentimental Education

Their putrid love doesn’t go down with me … not anymore!

— Journey to the End of the Night

Indeed, like the same traveller if he does not awake until he has crossed the frontier and is back in France, when Swann chanced to alight, close at hand, on proof that Forcheville had been Odette’s lover, he realised that it caused him no pain, that love was now far behind, and he regretted that he had had no warning of the moment when he had emerged from it forever.

— In Search of Lost Time

“Take pocketfuls of love besides to them all at home,” was her last word before he closed the outer door on himself.

— Middlemarch

A fly, even, if it came to light on him, perhaps meant to say to him: “I love you.”

— History

You and I on the Bowery together, together until death-do-us-part, love until death.

— The Golden Notebook

Do you love me?

— The Brothers Karamazov

I hit him then, square to the jaw-bone, stammering with love-for-the-world, love-for-my-friends, for the Daves and the Mikes and the Buddies.

— The Golden Notebook

The words were not exactly a hymn, but they certainly fitted his Sunday experience:—

 

O me, O me, what frugal cheer

My love doth feed upon!

A touch, a ray, that is not here,

A shadow that is gone:

 

A dream of breath that might be near,

An inly-echoed tone,

The thought that one may think me dear

The place where one was known,

 

The tremor of a banished fear,

An ill that was not done—

O me, O me, what frugal cheer

My love doth feed upon!

— Middlemarch

It appeared that this other woman needed a great deal of admonition and encouragement in love and is childish.

— The Golden Notebook

And just as love songs prepare boys and girls for love, so the ardent Florentine verses prepared Italian youths for the day of deliverance.

— Zorba the Greek

The unqualified truth is, that when I loved Estella with the love of a man, I loved her simply because I found her irresistible.

— Great Expectations

This is why after the passing of their one great youthful love most people no longer feel the absence of the soul, so that this so-called foolishness fulfills a meritorious social function.

— The Man Without Qualities

This, for once, was not just a woman dominated by her body and exhibiting a ridiculous yearning to find comfort in a high intellectual tone; here it was the beauty of that body itself uttering its right to the gentle dignity of love.

— The Man Without Qualities

It came over her too now — the emotion, the vibration of love.

— To the Lighthouse

I at least have a husband I love.

— Anna Karenina

‘No, she does not and cannot love him,’ he decided to himself.

— Anna Karenina

“God bless you, madam!” said Tantripp, with an irrepressible movement of love towards the beautiful, gentle creature for whom she felt unable to do anything more, now that she had finished tying the bonnet.

— Middlemarch

His remark, so frank but so foolish, changed everything in an instant; now sure of his love, Mathilde despised him thoroughly.

— The Red and the Black

He realises that his need for temporary refuge has trapped him into what he most dreads: a woman saying, I love you.

— The Golden Notebook

But now suddenly, seeing that noble, manly face, so familiar and dear to her, she felt an unexpected surge of love for him.

— Anna Karenina

People who enjoyed picking up antiques, who liked poetry, despised sordid calculations of profit and loss, and nourished ideals of honour and love, she placed in a class by themselves, superior to the rest of humanity.

— In Search of Lost Time

Besides that, his former relations with Kitty—the relations of an adult to a child, because of his friendship with her brother—seemed to him another new obstacle to love.

— Anna Karenina

You found enough love in your heart to forgive…

— Anna Karenina

Exactly the same is the case with love, for which man undergoes preparation on the most tremendous scale.

— The Man Without Qualities
money

This is dealt with by the principle of division of labour: for such premonitions and inner sorrow humanity has its special sort of intellectuals, those who make and those who hear the confessions of the age, jobbers in absolution, literary Lenten preachers and literary evangelists whom it is particularly important to have in the world if personally one cannot manage to carry out their principles; and what constitutes pretty much the same sort of moral ransom-money is the phrase-making and funds that the State annually sinks in cultural schemes that have no solid basis.

— The Man Without Qualities

But it is not the sum of money itself that matter here—it is the fact that this sum was being used with disgusting cynicism to shatter his dream!

— The Brothers Karamazov

He laid the rent he owed—five back weeks, for he was bad about money, on the table.

— The Golden Notebook

If he ever felt keenly any question of money it was through the medium of another passion than the love of material property.

— Middlemarch

And suppose that Mary could help you to go to Mr. Hanmer’s with the money she gets?

— Middlemarch

I want money, money makes money, a man needs money.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

I don’t like it, but I know it’s uncommonly hard on my father to say so, after he has spent a good deal of money in educating me for it.

— Middlemarch

But he, to whom nothing could have seemed more tedious hitherto than all that pertained to the cosmopolitan life of Baden or of Nice, having learned that Odette had perhaps one day led a gay life in those pleasure-cities, although he could never find out whether it had been solely to satisfy a need for money which, thanks to him, she no longer felt, or from some capricious instinct which might at any moment revive in her, now leaned in impotent, blind, dizzy anguish over the bottomless abyss in which those early years of MacMahon’s Presidency had been engulfed, years during which one spent the winter on the Promenade des Anglais, the summer beneath the limes of Baden, and he would find in them a painful but magnificent profundity, such as a poet might have lent them; indeed he would have devoted to the reconstruction of the petty details of social life on the Côte d’Azur in those days, if it could have helped him to understand something of Odette’s smile and the look in her eyes—candid and simple though they were—as much passion as the aesthete who ransacks the extant documents of fifteenth-century Florence in order to penetrate further into the soul of the Primavera, the fair Vanna or the Venus of Botticelli.

— In Search of Lost Time

‘Come, Mr. Drummle, since we are on the subject, I’ll tell you what passed between Herbert here and me, when you borrowed that money.’

— Great Expectations

“Brother Peter, God forgive him, got money out of a company,” said Mrs. Waule.

— Middlemarch

When asked about the money Fyodor Karamazov had prepared for her, she said she had never seen it and had only heard from “the murderer” that there was an envelope with three thousand rubles in it.

— The Brothers Karamazov

I wanted him to see for himself what sort of person he was, and, indeed, he took the money and spent it with that creature in that place, in one single night…

— The Brothers Karamazov

The judges will help you to reckon up that money if you’re really interested, Dmitry.

— The Brothers Karamazov

So there’s nothing easier now than to make him accept the two hundred rubles no later than tomorrow, since he’s already proved to himself that he’s a man of honor by throwing away the money offered to him and trampling it underfoot.

— The Brothers Karamazov

But where was he to get the money he needed so desperately?

— The Brothers Karamazov

I needed the money urgently.

— The Brothers Karamazov

I’ve never before met a man who was born rich who had your attitude to money.

— The Golden Notebook

Being unable to smoke unhinged Nino’s reason, until the wretched Iduzza, rather than see him go mad, forswore her oath and gave him money for some cigarettes, even at black-market prices.

— History

Nor were there any serious shortages of commodities to buy with the money.

— The Golden Notebook

One day, when reflections of this sort had brought him back to the memory of the time when someone had spoken to him of Odette as of a kept woman, and he was amusing himself once again with contrasting that strange personification, the kept woman—an iridescent mixture of unknown and demoniacal qualities embroidered, as in some fantasy of Gustave Moreau, with poison-dripping flowers interwoven with precious jewels—with the Odette on whose face he had seen the same expressions of pity for a sufferer, revolt against an act of injustice, gratitude for an act of kindness, which he had seen in earlier days on his own mother’s face and on the faces of his friends, the Odette whose conversation so frequently turned on the things that he himself knew better than anyone, his collections, his room, his old servant, the banker who kept all his securities, it happened that the thought of the banker reminded him that he must call on him shortly to draw some money.

— In Search of Lost Time

“Here’s the money… I mean the money that was in that envelope over there.”

— The Brothers Karamazov

What do you want to give me money for?

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

And when I say that I am going away within the hour, for I am soon going abroad, and that I shall never rest until I have worked for the money with which you have kept me out of prison, and have sent it to you, don’t think, dear Joe and Biddy, that if I could repay it a thousand times over, I suppose I could cancel a farthing of the debt I owe you, or that I would do so if I could!

— Great Expectations

But all I know about him is that he was a man who brought me some money that he owed me for a length of cloth I had sold him.

— The Decameron

He was fed up with the baroness, especially since she kept wanting to give him money; but there was one, he would show her to Vronsky, a wonder, a delight, in the severe Levantine style, the ‘slave-girl Rebecca genre, you know’.

— Anna Karenina

Levin was waiting only for the delivery of the wheat, so as to get the money and go abroad.

— Anna Karenina

The same discrediting technique was applied to the Poles, who came in with haughty and arrogant airs, declared that they were “servants of the Crown,” that the accused “had tried to buy their honor for three thousand rubles,” and that they themselves had seen him holding in his hands “large sums of money.”

— The Brothers Karamazov

You have your money and your daughter and your husband; why should you care whether the estate is shared out to everyone or kept by the powerful?

— Children of Gebelawi

But as to money and place in the world,” Will ended, tossing back his head, “I think it is pretty clear that I am not determined by consideration of that sort.”

— Middlemarch

I also knew that she was greedy for money and satisfied her greed by lending money at exorbitant rates of interest, that she was a sharp and merciless bitch.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Once toward the end of my stay, I thought of writing to Monsieur Puta to touch him for some money.

— Journey to the End of the Night

I have neither any real fear that my money will run out, nor any desire of increasing it: The fruit of riches is abundance, and sufficiency declares abundance [Cicero}.

— Essays

Well, for your information, Alexei, my brother, I am a petty thief who steals from people’s pockets or wherever else he can find money.

— The Brothers Karamazov
death

But life after death—it is such a puzzle and no one, no one at all, has the answer!

— The Brothers Karamazov

Why not simply his death, instead of this tender music from the past?

— Pedro Páramo

The terrible thing in this sort of grief is that, unlike anything else — a loss, a death — one cannot simply bear one’s cross.

— Anna Karenina

I once heard a prince, a very great captain, maintain that a soldier could not be condemned to death for faintheartedness; he had just been told the story at table of the trial of the seigneur de Vervins, who was condemned to death for having surrendered Boulogne.

— Essays

When the softening produced in her by the nearness of death passed, Alexei Alexandrovich began to notice that Anna was afraid of him, felt burdened by him, and could not look him straight in the eye.

— Anna Karenina

Several times in the course of a year I would hear my grandfather tell at table the story, which never varied, of the behaviour of M. Swann the elder upon the death of his wife, by whose bedside he had watched day and night.

— In Search of Lost Time

Death, true, he well deserves, but I to be

His death’s designer—that I cannot bear!—

So shall he go unscathed?

— Metamorphoses

Everyone will know that he is mortal, that there is no resurrection for him, and will accept his death with calm and dignity, like a god.

— The Brothers Karamazov

—There is no gistus to it, noodle!—’tis my own name, replied the curate, dipping his hand as he spoke into the bason—Tristram! said he, &c. &c. &c. &c. so Tristram was I called, and Tristram shall I be to the day of my death.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

You have just saved a man from violent death, from a bullet…

— The Brothers Karamazov

To be sure, he is unafraid in the presence of death, but if you beat him he will squeal and wriggle.

— Essays

Everyone had brought a present: Dittmer a Syrian stole, Rosenwald an album of love-songs, Burrieu a water-colour, Sombaz a cartoon of himself, and Pellerin a charcoal sketch representing a sort of Dance of Death, weird and gruesome, and rather poorly drawn.

— A Sentimental Education

Remember, everyone told you that horse would be the death of you one day.

— Pedro Páramo

I sat down to wait for death.

— Pedro Páramo

You too, dear father, you, immortal now

And destined by your birthright to live on

Through all eternity, will long to die

When you are tortured by the serpent’s blood,

That agonizing poison in your wounds;

And, saved from immortality, the gods

Shall put you in death’s power, and the three

Goddesses shall unloose your threads of fate.

— Metamorphoses

At the very outset of one, a man takes the rank assigned to him by his way of facing death.

— The Red and the Black

Death doesn’t resemble slumber, I said, since in slumber one is alive and sleeping, and I don’t know how death can resemble anything at all for us, since we have no experience of it, nor anything to compare it to.

— The Book of Disquiet

‘Of death.’

— The Golden Notebook

“Bear no hand in his death.”

— Things Fall Apart

Père Birouette had caught a glimpse of death.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Bodies I saw thrown by the temple doors;

Before the altars, even, to put the gods

To greater shame, some hanged themselves, and fled

By death the fear of death, and called their fate

That came uncalled.

— Metamorphoses

But death is surely waiting for us in the alley.

— Children of Gebelawi

The story begun in Bombay continues in the lowlands of Palanpur, pauses for a night and a day at the stone gate of Bikanir, narrates the death of a blind astrologer in a cesspool in Benares, conspires in the multiform palace at Katmandu, prays and fornicates in the pestilential stench of the Machua bazaar in Calcutta, watches the day being born out of the sea from a scribe’s stool in Madras, watches the evening decline into the sea from a balcony in the state of Travancor, gutters and dies in Hindapur, and close its circle of leagues and years in Bombay again, a few steps from the garden of those “moon-coloured” hounds.

— Ficciones

If we don’t manage to save him by an appeal for mercy, his death will be a kind of suicide….

— The Red and the Black

That kindly but distracted lady, hearing of the elder’s death upon awakening that morning, had been seized by such violent curiosity that she had at once delegated Rakitin to observe everything for her at the hermitage (since she could not be admitted herself) and to send her a “complete” written report every half hour of so.

— The Brothers Karamazov

The scream grew more and more remote as I realized the melancholy fact that neither tomorrow, nor Friday, nor any other day or night, could I make myself put her to death.

— Lolita

Death and loneliness!

— The Brothers Karamazov

That moment was more painful than death.

— The Red and the Black

Do not bear a hand in his death.

— Things Fall Apart

At the funeral his old friends whispered of what Suzumoto called his pleasant death.

— The Sound of the Mountain

She said the word often enough, and there could be no doubt that she meant to say it; but if the often repeated word had been hate instead of love—despair—revenge—dire death—it could not have sounded from her lips more like a curse.

— Great Expectations

Death… death… always death.

— Children of Gebelawi

Agafya Mikhailovna, speaking of an old man who had died, said: ‘Well, thank God, he took communion, got anointed, God grant everybody such a death.’

— Anna Karenina