love
money
death
love

Tell your wife that I love her as before, and if she cannot forgive me my situation, I wish her never to forgive me.

— Anna Karenina

And if they pretend to love you, they will do so to betray you all the more surely.

— The Red and the Black

This is why after the passing of their one great youthful love most people no longer feel the absence of the soul, so that this so-called foolishness fulfills a meritorious social function.

— The Man Without Qualities

I regretted keenly her mistake about my private aesthetics, for I simply love that tinge of Botticellian pink, that raw rose about the lips, those wet, matted eyelashes; and, naturally, her bashful whim deprived me of many opportunities of specious consolation.

— Lolita

I want love and there is none.

— Anna Karenina

So Diotima learned to know love as something violent, spasmodic and abrupt, which was set free by an even stronger force only once in every week.

— The Man Without Qualities

I have not tended my own vineyard

and he took me into the house

and his banners of love were over me!

— History

‘Do you think Wad Rayyes has fallen in love with Hosna Bint Mahmoud?’ I said to Mahjoub, who had cheered me up.

— Season of Migration to the North

I made all that up for a woman who was once in love with me and who bored me….

— The Red and the Black

And now I’ve come to love you still more,’ she said with tears in her eyes.

— Anna Karenina

It’s true, Sedano, I do love her.

— Pedro Páramo

I love a man who is not my husband.

— The Red and the Black

Now those I love and wish to free hate me, and I may be killed by one of them.

— Children of Gebelawi

Claude Lorrain was right in saying that the foreground of a picture is always repugnant and that the interest of an artwork must be seen in the distance, in that unfathomable realm which is the refuge of lies, of those dreams caught in the act, which are the only thing men love.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Drawing on Fouqué’s confidences and the little he had read about love in the Bible, he planned a detailed offensive.

— The Red and the Black

But mark,- -’twas out of no contempt of Peireskius at all;—but that Peireskius’s indefatigable labour in trudging so far on foot out of love for the sciences, reduced the exploit of Dr. Slop, in that affair, to nothing;—the more fool Peireskius, said he again:—Why so?—replied my father, taking his brother’s part, not only to make reparation as fast as he could for the insult he had given him, which sat still upon my father’s mind;—but partly, that my father began really to interest himself in the discourse;—Why so?—said he.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

After this article came a dead silence, both printed and oral, about the book, and Sergei Ivanovich saw that his work of six years, elaborated with such love and effort, had gone by without leaving a trace.

— Anna Karenina

Isn’t that so, my love, no one really knows you well except me?

— In Search of Lost Time

In Moscow, after the luxurious and coarse life of Petersburg, he had experienced for the first time the charm of intimacy with a sweet, innocent society girl who had fallen in love with him.

— Anna Karenina

Swann was still unconscious of the disgrace that threatened him at the Verdurins’, and continued to regard all their absurdities in the most rosy light, through the admiring eyes of love.

— In Search of Lost Time

He was not thinking that the Christian law which he had wanted to follow all his life prescribed that he forgive and love his enemies; but the joyful feeling of love and forgiveness of his enemies filled his soul.

— Anna Karenina

I know it’s not him I love; but even so, it’s fun to be with him, and he’s so nice.

— Anna Karenina

Do you know, Anna, I love that woman, I love that woman so much that …

— The Golden Notebook

And each of those raptures of love is dated! … one from the day before yesterday.

— The Red and the Black

Rosamond, for her part, had never enjoyed the days so much in her life before: she was sure of being admired by some one worth captivating, and she did not distinguish flirtation from love, either in herself or in another.

— Middlemarch

But love is barred to them because of the first stark experience, without emotion.

— The Golden Notebook

“Well! she doesn’t love me anymore,” he kept repeating aloud, as if to let himself know where he stood.

— The Red and the Black

It seemed to her that if he knew it, he would stop loving her sooner; and she feared nothing so much now, though she had no reason for it, as losing his love.

— Anna Karenina

And she shut her eyes not to see it, and was happy in the movements of love.

— The Golden Notebook

‘No, her heart speaks, but consider; you men have your eye on a girl, you visit the house, you make friends, you watch, you wait to see if you’re going to find what you love, and then, once you’re convinced of your love, you propose …’

— Anna Karenina

People who enjoyed picking up antiques, who liked poetry, despised sordid calculations of profit and loss, and nourished ideals of honour and love, she placed in a class by themselves, superior to the rest of humanity.

— In Search of Lost Time

‘Janet is just going to sleep and she sends her love,’ she said loudly into the instrument; and Molly replied, playing her part: ‘Send my love to Janet and say she must go to sleep at once.’

— The Golden Notebook

From her I learnt to love Bach’s music, Keat’s poetry, and from her I heard for the first time of Mark Twain.

— Season of Migration to the North
money

“No, I’ve nothing to say about the money—I have no wish to offend you, Misha.”

— The Brothers Karamazov

Then I take my hat round—this beret here!—and it fills up with money.

— Zorba the Greek

She was wishing it were possible to restore the times of primitive zeal, and yet thinking of Mr. Farebrother with a strong desire to rescue him from his chance-gotten money.

— Middlemarch

I returned with money with which to buy land, repair the water-wheel, and circumcise my sons.

— Season of Migration to the North

“Ah, there’s better folks spent their money worse,” said a firm-voiced dyer, whose crimson hands looked out of keeping with his good-natured face.

— Middlemarch

When Ali Bey stayed the night with me—what a moustache, what eyebrows, what arms he had!—he’d call to the tambourine and flute players and throw them money through the window, so that they’d play in my courtyard until dawn.

— Zorba the Greek

I will not touch your key or your money, sir.

— Middlemarch

“But you realize, of course,” the abbé went on sourly, “that he is not going to give you all that money for your good looks.

— The Red and the Black

Papa was not a rock: he had no other fixity than that fixity of alternating impulses sometimes called habit, and this was altogether unfavorable to his taking the only decisive line of conduct in relation to his daughter’s engagement—namely, to inquire thoroughly into Lydgate’s circumstances, declare his own inability to furnish money, and forbid alike either a speedy marriage or an engagement which must be too lengthy.

— Middlemarch

Grandma Henrouille was making a lot of money out of these scrapings of the centuries.

— Journey to the End of the Night

I have to admit it was only for need of money, but how very pressing, how imperious a need! that I started looking for Lola.

— Journey to the End of the Night

That’s why you lose money on them, because they’re dead: you have to pay for them and now I’ll save you the payments and the worry.

— Dead Souls

No money, no friends.

— The Golden Notebook

A husband who complains about his wife’s conduct covers himself with ridicule (a thing that is becoming less dangerous every day in France); but his wife, if he doesn’t give her any money, is reduced to the condition of a working woman, at fifteen sous a day, and even then, virtuous women will hesitate to employ her.

— The Red and the Black

Yet money, money, money all the time.

— The Golden Notebook

I took the offensive: “Lola, lend me the money you promised or I’ll sleep here, and you’ll hear me repeat all I know about cancer, its complications, its hereditary character, because you know, Lola, cancer is hereditary, and don’t forget it!”

— Journey to the End of the Night

So great is your ennui that if you had a little money you’d jump into a cab and escape.

— Journey to the End of the Night

And it’s openly said that young Vincy has raised money on his expectations.

— Middlemarch

“I never was covetous, Jane,” she replied; “but I have six children and have buried three, and I didn’t marry into money.

— Middlemarch

He had once believed that nothing would urge him into making an application for money to his uncle, but he had not then known the full pressure of alternatives yet more disagreeable.

— Middlemarch

But Dmitry wants to break into that fortress, to unlock it with a golden key, and if he’s trying to bully me now, it’s to get money out of me for that purpose.

— The Brothers Karamazov

He listened to Agafya Mikhailovna’s talk of how Prokhor had forgotten God and, with the money Levin had given him to buy a horse, was drinking incessantly and had beaten his wife almost to death; he listened, read the book and remembered the whole course of his thoughts evoked by the reading.

— Anna Karenina

The others gathered round him, while Daabas collected up the money and put it back in the breast of his smock.

— Children of Gebelawi

Returning home, he got angry with his wife for being unable to handle the landlady, who was demanding money.

— Anna Karenina

The fact is—in every profession that is followed not for the sake of money but for love, there comes a moment when the advancing years seem to be leading into the void.

— The Man Without Qualities

He must tell that he had not known of Raffle’s existence when he first mentioned his pressing need of money to Bulstrode, and that he took the money innocently as a result of that communication, not knowing that a new motive for the loan might have arisen on his being called into this man.

— Middlemarch

I had the impression that what with his little business he must be putting quite a lot of money aside.

— Journey to the End of the Night

We look forward to getting your protection money.

— Children of Gebelawi

She seemed to be of that species of small lady landowner that keep complaining about poor crops and losing money and that hold their heads slightly to one side while on the sly they are accumulating cash kept in little patchwork bags cached away in various drawers.

— Dead Souls

‘Oh he’s got money?’

— The Golden Notebook

Bloodshed won’t show where the lost money is.

— Children of Gebelawi

Will had given a disinterested attention to an intended settlement on a new plan in the Far West, and the need for funds in order to carry out a good design had set him on debating with himself whether it would not be a laudable use to make of his claim on Bulstrode, to urge the application of that money which had been offered to himself as a means of carrying out a scheme likely to be largely beneficial.

— Middlemarch

Balkiti said scornfully:

‘It’s not good for a man to live like a rabbit or a chicken; but look at you; you haven’t learnt a thing and your money’s almost all gone.’

— Children of Gebelawi
death

The Führer orders the last-ditch defense of the German cities, insisting on the death penalty for any transgressors.

— History

Far from avenging me, you would be signing my death warrant.

— The Red and the Black

No, not even with death.

— The Book of Disquiet

I also know that the shock of Annabel’s death consolidated the frustration of that nightmare summer, made of it a permanent obstacle to any further romance throughout the cold years of my youth.

— Lolita

Long after her death I felt her thoughts floating through mine.

— Lolita

Where was the Arafa she had loved, the Arafa who had defied Santoury to marry her, who had risked death several times for the sake of the alley, until she had begun to think he was one of the storytellers’ heroes?

— Children of Gebelawi

Père Birouette had caught a glimpse of death.

— Journey to the End of the Night

For a moment I thought you were talking seriously about the Church doing such things as prosecuting criminals and sentencing people to floggings, detention, and even, I suppose, death.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And she peered into the dish, with its shiny walls and its confusion of savoury brown and yellow meats, and its bay leaves and its wine, and thought, This will celebrate the occasion — a curious sense rising in her, at once freakish and tender, of celebrating a festival, as if two emotions were called up in her, one profound — for what could be more serious than the love of man for woman, what more commanding, more impressive, bearing in its bosom the seeds of death; at the same time these lovers, these people entering into illusion glittering eyed, must be danced round with mockery, decorated with garlands.

— To the Lighthouse

My vengeance is my guilt:

Death must be paid with death, crime piled on crime,

Bloodshed on bloodshed.

— Metamorphoses

Karamazov was drunk when he learned of his wife’s death, and some say he exclaimed joyfully, raising his hands to heaven: “Lord, now let Your servant depart in peace.”

— The Brothers Karamazov

And then, at last, she sees it is her lover,

And screams, beating her breast, tearing her hair,

And takes him in her arms and bathes the wound

With gushing tears that mingle with his blood,

And prints her kisses on his death-cold lips,

Crying “My Pyramus, oh, what mischance

Has reft you from me?

— Metamorphoses

In Christ’s expression there had to be pity, because there was in him the expression of love, unearthly peace, readiness for death and an awareness of the vanity of words.

— Anna Karenina

“It is that you will let me know deliberately, whether, in case of my death, you will carry out my wishes: whether you will avoid doing what I should deprecate, and apply yourself to do what I should desire.”

— Middlemarch

Sir James never ceased to regard Dorothea’s second marriage as a mistake; and indeed this remained the tradition concerning it in Middlemarch, where she was spoken of to a younger generation as a fine girl who married a sickly clergyman, old enough to be her father, and in little more than a year after his death gave up her estate to marry his cousin—young enough to have been his son, with no property, and not well-born.

— Middlemarch

But the truth was that in the depths of his morbid condition he feared death itself no more than such a recovery, which would in fact amount to the death of all that he was now.

— In Search of Lost Time

Even the death she chose was mean and low.

— Anna Karenina

He also knew that many great masculine minds, whose thoughts about it he had read, had pondered death and yet did not know a hundredth part of what his wife and Agafya Mikhailovna knew about it.

— Anna Karenina

For days after she had heard of her death she had seen her thus, putting her wreath to her forehead and going unquestioningly with her companion, a shadow, across the fields.

— To the Lighthouse

Kassem would perhaps not have been anxious if it hadn’t been for the memory of the death of Rifaa near to his ancestor’s house.

— Children of Gebelawi

There is a large element of chance in these matters, and a second chance occurrence, that of our own death, often prevents us from awaiting for any length of time the favours of the first.

— In Search of Lost Time

Life folded Death; Death trellised Life; the grim god wived with youthful Life, and begat him curly-headed glories.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

If they were, they’d all starve to death!

— Children of Gebelawi

But he had a chivalrous nature (was not the disinterested service of woman among the ideal glories of old chivalry?): his disregarded love had not turned to bitterness; its death had made sweet odors—floating memories that clung with a consecrating effect to Dorothea.

— Middlemarch

Then Meleager, one foot placed upon

That head of doom and death, said ‘Take the prize

That’s mine to give, fair girl of Arcady,

And share the glory of the day with me!’

— Metamorphoses

The death of a young man who had not known he was going to commit suicide until the moment of death, when he understood that he had in fact been preparing for it, and in great detail, for months.

— The Golden Notebook

Every one of these news items referred to violence, death, rioting, hatred, in some part of Africa.

— The Golden Notebook

That when once a vile name was wrongfully or injudiciously given, ’twas not like the case of a man’s character, which, when wrong’d, might hereafter be clear’d;——and, possibly, sometime or other, if not in the man’s life, as least after his death,—be, somehow or other, set to rights with the world: But the injury of this, he would say, could never be undone;- – – nay, he doubted even whether and act of parliament could reach it:——He knew as well as you, that the legislature assum’d a power over surnames;—but for very strong reasons, which he could give, it had never yet adventured, he would say, to go a step further.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

I picked up another photograph and read the dedication which was in a bold, forward-slanting hand: ‘To you until death, Isabella.’

— Season of Migration to the North

He was sick to death of all his good qualities, of everything he had once cared for enthusiastically; and in this state of inverted imagination, he undertook to judge life with his imagination.

— The Red and the Black

Stormed at by shot and shell, boldly we rode and well, flashed through the valley of death, volleyed and thundered—straight into Lily Briscoe and William Bankes.

— To the Lighthouse

But would they have sent it back immediately upon her death?

— The Sound of the Mountain

Here now’s the very dreaded symbol of grim death, by a mere hap, made the expressive sign of the help and hope of most endangered life.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale