love
money
death
love

The waters of her pool

Fell silent; from the depths their goddess raised

Her head and, combing her green tresses dry,

Told the old story of Alpheus’ love.

— Metamorphoses

Even Sobakevich, who seldom had a kind word for anyone, once arrived home from town very late, undressed, stretched out on his bed next to his gaunt wife and declared: “You know, my love, I went to a reception at the governor’s and to dinner with the chief of police and made the acquaintance of a collegiate councillor called Pavel Ivanovich Chichikov—an extremely pleasant fellow.”

— Dead Souls

“I never shall be good for anything, Mary, if you will not say that you love me—if you will not promise to marry me—I mean, when I am able to marry.”

— Middlemarch

I just love it!

— Anna Karenina

If love and loyalty

Move you at all, unless hope springs in vain,

Do him this service.

— Metamorphoses

As a competent businesswoman, the patronne knew all the gossip of the colony, all the desperate love affairs that transpired between the fever-harried officers and the handful of civil servants’ wives, they too menstruating interminably and languishing for days on end in the deep reclining chairs of their verandas.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Brief, fading ivy, climbing, fugitive flora!—the most colorless, the most depressing, to many minds, of all that creep on walls or decorate windows; to me the dearest of them all ever since the day when it appeared upon our balcony, like the very shadow of the presence of Gilberte, who was perhaps already in the Champs-Elysées, and as soon as I arrived there would greet me with: “Let’s begin at once; you’re on my side”; frail, swept away by a breath, but at the same time in harmony, not with the season, but with the hour; promise of that immediate happiness which the day will deny or fulfil, and thereby of one paramount immediate happiness, the happiness of love; softer, warmer upon the stone even than moss; robust, a ray of sunlight sufficing for it to spring into life and blossom into joy, even in the heart of winter.

— In Search of Lost Time

Besides, she doesn’t care for him in that way, she says; it’s an ideal love, she’s afraid of rubbing the bloom off—but how should I know?

— In Search of Lost Time

By chance that day on Jason’s features shone

Uncommon grace; her love could find excuse.

— Metamorphoses

We traveled very leisurely, having more than a week to reach Wace, Continental Divide, where she passionately desired to see the Ceremonial Dances marking the seasonal opening of Magic Cave, and at least three weeks to reach Elphinstone, gem of a western State where she yearned to climb Red Rock from which a mature screen star had recently jumped to her death after a drunken row with her gigolo.

— Lolita

Like many a plucked idle young gentleman, he was thoroughly in love, and with a plain girl who had no money!

— Middlemarch

(It was very curious the way she considered — and kept doing so for a long time — all caresses except kisses on the mouth or the stark act of love either ‘romantic slosh’ or ‘abnormal.’)

— Lolita

But just as the conversation, the smiles, the kisses of Odette became as odious to him as he had once found them pleasing, if they were addressed to others, so the Verdurins’ salon, which, not an hour before, had still seemed to him amusing, inspired with a genuine feeling for art and even with a sort of moral nobility, exhibited to him all its absurdities, its foolishness, its ignominy, now that it was another than himself whom Odette was going to meet there, to love there without restraint.

— In Search of Lost Time

As she dressed, she paid more attention to her toilette than she had all those days, as if, having ceased to love her, he might start loving her again because she was wearing a dress or had done her hair in a way more becoming to her.

— Anna Karenina

That’s all she knew, her ‘I love you’ jazz.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Although love is a sexual instinct, it’s not with sexual instinct that we love but with the conjecture of some other feeling.

— The Book of Disquiet

‘She may come to her senses and understand only after marrying that she does not and cannot love me.’

— Anna Karenina

How wonderful love must be when Johnny comes marching home!

— Journey to the End of the Night

I was touched by my friend’s kindness in having procured the book for me; and as everyone needs to find reasons for his passion, to the extent of being glad to recognise in the loved one qualities which (he has learned from literature or conversation) are worthy of love, to the extent of assimilating them by imitation and making them additional reasons for his love, even though these qualities are diametrically opposed to those his love would have sought after as long as it was spontaneous—as Swann, before my day, had sought to establish the aesthetic basis of Odette’s beauty—I, who had at first loved Gilberte, from Combray onwards, on account of all the unknown element in her life in which I longed to be immersed, reincarnated, discarding my own as a thing of no account, I thought now, as of an inestimable privilege, that of this too familiar, despised life of mine Gilberte might one day become the humble servant, the kindly and comforting collaborator, who in the evenings, helping me in my work, would collate for me the texts of rare pamphlets.

— In Search of Lost Time

He wanted to say that it’s unnatural for me to love someone else’s child when I don’t love my own daughter.

— Anna Karenina

I probably did love Maman, but that didn’t mean anything.

— The Stranger

‘How happy I’ll be when I find out you’ve fallen in love!’ said Levin.

— Anna Karenina

Of course, the postmaster, the president, and the police chief ribbed him, as is often done during card games, inquiring whether he hadn’t fallen in love, saying that they were aware that his heart had been captured and that they could guess by whom.

— Dead Souls

Not only were all the young men who danced at the Moscow balls in love with Kitty, but already in this first season two serious suitors had presented themselves: Levin and, immediately after his departure, Count Vronsky.

— Anna Karenina

If I were a man, I wouldn’t be able to love anyone after knowing you.

— Anna Karenina

And from that day on he called her so in his thoughts, after that celebrated female philosopher of love.

— The Man Without Qualities

“If she didn’t love me just a little,” he told himself, “she wouldn’t want to change me.”

— In Search of Lost Time

And before Swann had time to understand what was happening and say to himself: “It’s the little phrase from Vinteuil’s sonata—I mustn’t listen!”, all his memories of the days when Odette had been in love with him, which he had succeeded until that moment in keeping invisible in the depths of his being, deceived by this sudden reflection of a season of love whose sun, they supposed, had dawned again, had awakened from their slumber, had taken wing and risen to sing maddeningly in his ears, without pity for his present desolation, the forgotten strains of happiness.

— In Search of Lost Time

I see it; but the joy I see

I cannot find’ (so fondly love is foiled!)

‘And—to my greater grief—between us lies

No mighty sea, no long and dusty road,

Nor mountain range nor bolted barbican.

— Metamorphoses

I have the highest idea of the spiritual and refined sentiments of this reverend gentleman, from this single stroke in his character, which I think comes up to any of the honest refinements of the peerless knight of La Mancha, whom, by the bye, with all his follies, I love more, and would actually have gone further to have paid a visit to, than the greatest hero of antiquity.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

You must love me just a little …

— Journey to the End of the Night

It was love, she thought, pretending to move her canvas, distilled and filtered; love that never attempted to clutch its object; but, like the love which mathematicians bear their symbols, or poets their phrases, was meant to be spread over the world and become part of the human gain.

— To the Lighthouse

Dear Madam: A reminder of you may lead to questions on the part of your son which could not be answered without instilling into the child’s soul a spirit of condemnation of what should be holy for him, and therefore I beg you to take your husband’s refusal in the spirit of Christian love.

— Anna Karenina
money

They had made a voluntary confession, and consequently Rinaldo’s horse, clothing and money were restored to him, and all he lost was a pair of garters, which the robbers were unable to account for.

— The Decameron

I wanted to buy wheat, offered good money.

— Anna Karenina

He could not ask his mother for money in order to get out of these difficulties.

— Anna Karenina

There was a Lydgate at John’s who spent no end of money.

— Middlemarch

And what do I tell them about the money?

— Pedro Páramo

People laughed at him because he was a loafer, and they swore never to lend him any more money because he never paid back.

— Things Fall Apart

But Fielding lived when the days were longer (for time, like money, is measured by our needs), when summer afternoons were spacious, and the clock ticked slowly in the winter evenings.

— Middlemarch

Since he had had an ability for painting from an early age and, not knowing how to spend his money, had begun to collect engravings, he now chose painting, began studying it, and put into it that idle store of desires which called for satisfaction.

— Anna Karenina

Of course I have not the least claim—indeed, I have already a debt to you which will never be discharged, even when I have been able to pay it in the shape of money.

— Middlemarch

Not that they made love very often, but since drinks at the pagoda were on the expensive side, they tried to get their money’s worth by pinching her ass something terrible before leaving.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Everything unrelated to making money is infinitely beyond him.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Listening to the story of my travels, Baryton not only relished a surge of romantic emotion but rejoiced at the money he was saving.

— Journey to the End of the Night

“It’s not quite enough, sir,” the woman said, but she looked very pleased as she took the money and even rushed ahead to open the door for them.

— Dead Souls

“Well, but how—we only want eighteen—here, put the rest back, child,—but how did you know about it?” said Caleb, who, in his unconquerable indifference to money, was beginning to be chiefly concerned about the relation the affair might have to Mary’s affections.

— Middlemarch

Only one thing prevented me from clearing out—lack of money.

— Journey to the End of the Night

The one joy after which his soul thirsted was to have a money-changer’s shop on a much-frequented quay, to have locks all round him of which he held the keys, and to look sublimely cool as he handled the breeding coins of all nations, while helpless Cupidity looked at him enviously from the other side of an iron lattice.

— Middlemarch

‘How can you give money!’ the princess and Kitty said with one voice.

— Anna Karenina

I owed money—a hundred and sixty pounds.

— Middlemarch

In the darkness we talked about Europe and the meals you can order if you’ve got the money, not to mention the drinks! so deliciously cool!

— Journey to the End of the Night

I see him today from that future as I see him today from right here: medium height, stocky, a bit coarse but affectionate, frank and savvy, brusque and affable, a boss not only in his handling of money but also in his unhurried hands, in their thick hair and veins that look like small coloured muscles, in his full but not fat neck, and in his ruddy and taut cheeks with their dark, always close-shaven whiskers.

— The Book of Disquiet

Apparently, the father had only been good at giving advice on saving money, and not so good at doing so himself.

— Dead Souls

And on the other…’ (he faltered) ‘hand, its a way for the district coterie to make a little money.

— Anna Karenina

For my practice I had found a small apartment at the edge of the “Zone,” from which I had a good view of the embankment and the workman who’s always standing up top, looking at nothing, with his arm in a big white bandage, the victim of a work accident, who doesn’t know what to do or what to think and hasn’t enough money to buy himself a drink and fill his mind.

— Journey to the End of the Night

You hear?—lady-birds—honey—money.

— Middlemarch

But all I know about him is that he was a man who brought me some money that he owed me for a length of cloth I had sold him.

— The Decameron

The urbane activity with which a man receives money is really marvellous, considering that we so earnestly believe money to be the root of all earthly ills, and that on no account can a monied man enter heaven.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

There were at that time in Kakania families whose houses were frequented by officers because their daughters married officers, and there were families whose daughters did not marry officers, either because there was no money to put down for the marriage-caution, or on principle, so that no officers frequented their houses.

— The Man Without Qualities

Returning home, he got angry with his wife for being unable to handle the landlady, who was demanding money.

— Anna Karenina

Now, when horses were needed both for the departing princess and for the midwife, this was difficult for Levin, but by the duty of hospitality he could not allow Darya Alexandrovna to hire horses while in his house, and, besides, he knew that the twenty roubles Darya Alexandrovna would be asked to pay for the trip were very important for her; and he felt Darya Alexandrovna’s money matters, which were in a very bad state, as if they were his own.

— Anna Karenina

I know that people who spend a great deal of money on themselves without knowing how they shall pay, must be selfish.

— Middlemarch

You know I owe you favors that can’t be repaid with money.

— Pedro Páramo

There was one of them waited more than two hours for me yesterday—offered me any money I asked.

— In Search of Lost Time

Dorothea’s outpouring of her notions about money, in the darkness of the night, had done nothing but bring a mixture of more odious foreboding into her husband’s mind.

— Middlemarch
death

But the moment Françoise herself was near me, some demon would urge me to try to make her angry, and I would avail myself of the slightest pretext to say to her that I regretted my aunt’s death because she had been a good woman in spite of her absurdities, but not in the least because she was my aunt; that she might have been my aunt and yet have seemed to me so odious that her death would not have caused me a moment’s sorrow—statements which, in a book, would have struck me as inept.

— In Search of Lost Time

An absurd remembrance of my future death sends a shiver down my spine.

— The Book of Disquiet

The death agony on the second floor didn’t last long.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Really, by the side of Sir James, he looks like a death’s head skinned over for the occasion.

— Middlemarch

Okonkwo did not taste any food for two days after the death of Ikemefuna.

— Things Fall Apart

It was extremely impersonal; it said something about death; it said very little about love.

— To the Lighthouse

But not to let his death go unavenged,

Lycormas snatched in fury from the door

The right crossbar and crashed it down upon

Pettalus’ neck, and he dropped like an ox

Slaughtered in sacrifice.

— Metamorphoses

I heard no more, for Mlle Vinteuil, with an air that was at once languid, awkward, bustling, honest and sad, came to the window and drew the shutters close; but I knew now what was the reward that M. Vinteuil, in return for all the suffering that he had endured in his lifetime on account of his daughter, had received from her after his death.

— In Search of Lost Time

When he woke up, instead of the news of his brother’s death that he had expected, he learned that the sick man had reverted to his earlier condition.

— Anna Karenina

To speak of unrelated things seemed to him offensive, impossible; to speak of death, of dark things — also impossible.

— Anna Karenina

In this way Moosbrugger had got to his death-sentence and owed it only to Count Leinsdorf’s influence and friendly feelings towards Ulrich that there was a prospect of his mental condition being examined once again.

— The Man Without Qualities

In marrying Dorothea Brooke I had to care for her wellbeing in case of my death.

— Middlemarch

You lost her then, then when her death was sure,

Unless her death indeed is what you want

And mean my grief to ease your cruel heart.

— Metamorphoses

Do not bear a hand in his death.

— Things Fall Apart

Long usage had, for this Stubb, converted the jaws of death into an easy chair.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

If you really wish to triumph in your mind over the idea of death —’ ‘Ray,’ said Lo for hurray, and languidly left the room, and for a long while I stared with smarting eyes into the fire.

— Lolita

The truth is death.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Upon his death, his heirs found nothing but chaotic manuscripts.

— Ficciones

Men lived by spoil and plunder;

Friend was not safe from friend, nor father safe

From son-in-law, and kindness rare between

Brother and brother; husbands plotted death

For wives and wives for husbands; stepmothers

With murderous hearts brewed devilish aconite,

And sons, importunate to glut their greed,

Studied the stars to time their fathers’ death.

— Metamorphoses

The Common People imagine, that by a secret Power bestowed by God upon the Temple, no Whale can pass by it without immediate death.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

For a moment he thought of taking refuge in the water, but then he realized that death would be a crown upon his age and absolve him from his labors.

— Ficciones

A short life to them, and a jolly death.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

And indeed he was possessed by the fear of his father’s contemptible life and shameful death.

— Things Fall Apart

However, whether for sanction or for chastisement, Mr. Bulstrode, hardly fifteen months after the death of Peter Featherstone, had become the proprietor of Stone Court, and what Peter would say “if he were worthy to know,” had become an inexhaustible and consolatory subject of conversation to his disappointed relatives.

— Middlemarch

King of Death!

— Journey to the End of the Night

‘Yes, I heard … Such a sudden death,’ said Levin.

— Anna Karenina

‘Death!’ she thought.

— Anna Karenina

He had expected to find the physical signs of approaching death more definite — greater weakness, greater emaciation — but still almost the same condition.

— Anna Karenina

My parents had to be content with sending me every day to the Champs-Elysées, in the custody of a person who would see that I did not tire myself; this person being none other than Françoise, who had entered our service after the death of my aunt Léonie.

— In Search of Lost Time

Cradled in my arms, I raised

Her body, dearer than my own to me, and tore

Her dress away and bound the cruel wound,

Trying to staunch the blood, and begged her not

To leave me, not condemn me by her death.

— Metamorphoses

Now then, thought I, unconsciously rolling up the sleeves of my frock, here goes for a cool, collected dive at death and destruction, and the devil fetch the hindmost.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

And how did death catch up with you?

— Dead Souls

Look, driven one leg to death, and spavined the other for life, and now wears out bone legs by the cord.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale