love
money
death
love

The point is whether you love him now or not,’ said Varenka, calling everything by its name.

— Anna Karenina

‘No, joking aside, I think that in order to know love one must make a mistake and then correct it,’ said Princess Betsy.

— Anna Karenina

The terrible thing is that my soul suddenly turned over, and instead of love, of tenderness, I feel only spite towards him, yes, spite.

— Anna Karenina

‘Well,’ she went on with zest, ‘as for me, I do smoke, and, as dear Dr. Pierce used to say: I’m not proud of it but I jeest love it.’

— Lolita

‘But, Kostya, you’re exaggerating,’ said Kitty, who in the depths of her soul rejoiced at the strength of his love which was now expressing itself in his jealousy.

— Anna Karenina

For they all stood up and invited him to accompany them into a cool walled garden, where they plied him with excellent wines and sweetmeats, and eventually they asked him, charmingly and with good grace, how it came about that he had fallen in love with this fair lady, when he was well aware that she was being courted by many a handsome, well-bred and sprightly young admirer.

— The Decameron

‘I have a very definite feeling our Louise is in love with that moron.’

— Lolita

How should I love him?

— Anna Karenina

They love to live in water; sometimes all

Their bodies plunge within the pool’s embrace;

Sometimes their heads pop up; often they swim

Upon the surface, often squat and rest

Upon the swampy bank and then jump back

To the cool pond; but even now they flex

Their squalid tongues in squabbling, and beneath

The water try to croak a watery curse.

— Metamorphoses

He liked Odette to say these things, just as if he had been in love with a Breton girl, he would have enjoyed seeing her in her coif and hearing her say that she believed in ghosts.

— In Search of Lost Time

‘I can’t believe you love me!’

— Anna Karenina

Him who revealed

And brought to ruin the love she hoped to hide

She punished with a love as ruinous.

— Metamorphoses

‘What is it, my love?’

— Anna Karenina

But, in spite of that, his love was known to the whole town — everyone had guessed more or less correctly about his relations with Mme Karenina — and the majority of the young men envied him precisely for what was most difficult in his love, for Karenin’s high position and the resulting conspicuousness of this liaison in society.

— Anna Karenina

You string Lola a line, and tell her I love her.

— Pedro Páramo

‘Clarity is not in form but in love,’ she said, getting more and more irritated, not by his words but by the tone of calm tranquility in which he spoke.

— Anna Karenina

It was love, she thought, pretending to move her canvas, distilled and filtered; love that never attempted to clutch its object; but, like the love which mathematicians bear their symbols, or poets their phrases, was meant to be spread over the world and become part of the human gain.

— To the Lighthouse

“I do feel it’s absurd that a man of his intelligence should let himself suffer for a woman of that sort, and one who isn’t even interesting, for they tell me she’s an absolute idiot!” she added with the wisdom invariably shown by people who, not being in love themselves, feel that a clever man should only be unhappy about a person who is worth his while; which is rather like being astonished that anyone should condescend to die of cholera at the bidding of so insignificant a creature as the comma bacillus.

— In Search of Lost Time

There was a gloomy girl Marion, and there was her stepmother who turned out to be, against all expectations, a young, gray, understanding redhead who explained to Marion that Marion’s dead mother had really been a heroic woman since she had deliberately dissimulated her great love for Marion because she was dying, and did not want her child to miss her.

— Lolita

For you men, who are free and can choose, it’s always clear whom you love.

— Anna Karenina

While I was getting ready to take advantage of this longed-for moment to effect, on the basis of the image of Gilberte which I had prepared beforehand but which had now gone from my head, the adjustment that would enable me, during the longs hours I must spend alone, to be certain that it was indeed her that I had in mind, that it was indeed my love for her that I was gradually putting together as one composes a book, she passed me a ball; and, like the idealist philosopher whose body takes account of the external world in the reality of which his intellect declines to believe, the same self which had made me greet her before I had identified her now urged me to seize the ball that she handed to me (as though she were a companion with whom I had come to play, and not a sister-soul with whom I had come to be united), made me, out of decorum, address a thousand and one polite and trivial remarks to her until the time came when she had to go, and so prevented me either from keeping a silence during which I might at last have laid hands once more on the urgent truant image, or from uttering the words which might have brought about the decisive progress in the course of our love the hope of which I was always obliged to postpone until the following afternoon.

— In Search of Lost Time

‘If I didn’t love you,’ said Darya Alexandrovna, and tears welled up in her eyes, ‘if I didn’t know you as I do … ’

— Anna Karenina

Me in the role of a man forgiving her and deigning to offer her his love!

— Anna Karenina

And Swann felt himself overflowing with affection towards her, as well as towards Mme Verdurin (and almost towards Odette, for the feeling that he now entertained for her, being no longer tinged with pain, could scarcely be described, now, as love) as from the platform of the omnibus he followed her with fond eyes as she gallantly threaded her way along the Rue Bonaparte, her plume erect, her skirt held up in one hand, while in the other she clasped her umbrella and her card-case with its monogram exposed to view, her muff dancing up and down in front of her as she went.

— In Search of Lost Time

His mother in her youth had been a brilliant society woman who, during her marriage and especially after it, had had many love affairs, known to all the world.

— Anna Karenina

I am a passionate and lonely woman and you are the love of my life.

— Lolita

And indeed he was always ready to love all these manifestations of life.

— The Man Without Qualities

But Clytie, although her love might well

Excuse her grief and grief her tale-bearing,

The Lord of Light no longer visited;

His dalliance was done.

— Metamorphoses

And here suddenly love comes along, and you’re lost, lost!

— Anna Karenina

But, now that he was in love with Odette, all this was changed; to share her sympathies, to strive to be one with her in spirit, was a task so attractive that he tried to find enjoyment in the things that she liked, and did find a pleasure, not only in imitating her habits but in adopting her opinions, which was all the deeper because, as those habits and opinions had no roots in his own intelligence, they reminded him only of his love, for the sake of which he had preferred them to his own.

— In Search of Lost Time

After all, Dante fell madly in love with his Beatrice when she was nine, a sparkling girleen, painted and lovely, and bejeweled, in a crimson frock, and this was in 1274, in Florence, at a private feast in the merry month of May.

— Lolita

His love for her, which she was certain of, was flattering and joyful for her.

— Anna Karenina

And invariably the charm of all the fancies which the thought of cathedrals used to inspire in me, the charm of the hills and valleys of the Ile-de-France and of the plains of Normandy, would be reflected in the picture I had formed in my mind’s eye of Mlle Swann; nothing more remained but to know and to love her.

— In Search of Lost Time
money

She had it on the tip of her tongue to say, as they strolled, ‘It’ll cost fifty pounds’, but instead, for her heart failed her about money, she talked about Jasper shooting birds, and he said, at once, soothing her instantly, that it was natural in a boy, and he trusted he would find betters ways of amusing himself before long.

— To the Lighthouse

Apart from the doctor’s young wife, they were reduced almost exclusively that season (for all that Mme Verdurin herself was a thoroughly virtuous woman who came of a respectable middle-class family, excessively rich and wholly undistinguished, with which she had gradually and of her own accord severed all connection) to a young woman almost of the demi-monde, a Mme de Crécy, whom Mme Verdurin called by her Christian name, Odette, and pronounce a “love,” and to the pianist’s aunt, who looked as though she had, at one period, “answered the door”: ladies quite ignorant of society, who in their naïvety had so easily been led to believe that the Princesse de Sagan and the Duchesse de Guermantes were obliged to pay large sums of money to other poor wretches in order to have anyone at their dinner-parties, that if somebody had offered to procure them an invitation to the house of either of those noblewomen, the concierge and the cocotte would have contemptuously declined.

— In Search of Lost Time

She would have money with her, which she would give to the hall porter and the footman so that they would let her in, and, without lifting her veil, she would tell them she had come from Seryozha’s godfather to wish him a happy birthday and had been charged with putting the toys by the boy’s bed.

— Anna Karenina

The steward, who had gone to the merchant, came and brought part of the money for the wheat.

— Anna Karenina

Arnheim, he said, had bought him in order some day to sell him back to the prince for a frightful lot of money, but he was going to run away and had only not been able to do it before this because it was so far to where his father lived.

— The Man Without Qualities

Returning home, he got angry with his wife for being unable to handle the landlady, who was demanding money.

— Anna Karenina

Sell them to me, and I’ll pay you money for them.

— Dead Souls

The people who form such purely intellectual circles are above considerations of money and social distinction; but it must not be forgotten that for this very reason there is a special fascination in it for them when a rich man decides to become one of them; and what was more, in his pamphlets and books Arnheim preached nothing less than precisely the union of soul and economics, or of ideas and power.

— The Man Without Qualities

For he would entertain on a shoestring, and in contrast to the normal habits of the Genoese (who are wont to dress in the height of fashion), he would sooner go about in rags than spend any money on his personal appearance.

— The Decameron

Do not pay for anyone, do not treat them; instead try to behave in such a way that people will treat you—because, above all, you should hold on to your money, it’s the most reliable thing there is in this world.

— Dead Souls

He was fed up with the baroness, especially since she kept wanting to give him money; but there was one, he would show her to Vronsky, a wonder, a delight, in the severe Levantine style, the ‘slave-girl Rebecca genre, you know’.

— Anna Karenina

Power, money, honours — that’s what women are seeking,’ said Pestsov.

— Anna Karenina

Let me say that with the money he gives me we can establish ourselves in Sayula and live in comfort for the rest of our days.

— Pedro Páramo

One glance sufficed to assure me that it was one of those cheap money boxes called for some reason ‘luizettas’ that you buy in Algiers and elsewhere, and wonder what to do with afterwards.

— Lolita

There’s nowhere to get the money to pay.

— Pedro Páramo

That was Mme Sorokin and her daughter calling by to bring me money and papers from maman.

— Anna Karenina

His diligence chanced to put him on the trail of a certain law-abiding citizen, endowed with far more money than common sense, who one day, not from any lack of faith but simply in the course of an innocent conversation with his friends, came out with the remark that he had a wine of such a quality that Christ himself would have drunk it.

— The Decameron

And when she saw that, despite all her warnings, my aunt continued to do exactly as she pleased, and to fling money away with both hands (or so at least Françoise believed) on undeserving creatures, she began to find that the presents she herself received from my aunt were very small compared to the imaginary riches squandered upon Eulalie.

— In Search of Lost Time

“Yes, money down.”

— Dead Souls

And then, suddenly, he wondered whether that was not precisely what was implied by “keeping” a woman (as if, in fact, that notion of keeping could be derived from elements not at all mysterious or perverse but belonging to the intimate routine of his daily life, such as that thousand-franc note, a familiar and domestic object, torn in places and stuck together again, which his valet, after paying the household accounts and the rent, had locked up in a drawer in the old writing-desk whence he had extracted it to send it, with four others, to Odette) and whether it might not be possible to apply to Odette, since he had known her (for he never suspected for a moment that she could ever have taken money from anyone before him), that title, which he had believed so wholly inapplicable to her, of “kept woman.”

— In Search of Lost Time

And indeed, a good deal of money had been and was still being spent on this case, altogether unproductively, and it was obvious that the whole case could lead nowhere.

— Anna Karenina

Why take money?

— Anna Karenina

And on the other…’ (he faltered) ‘hand, its a way for the district coterie to make a little money.

— Anna Karenina

She can send me the money through Yegorov.

— Anna Karenina

I’ve certainly committed some follies, like everybody else, but money is the least thing, I’m not sorry about it.

— Anna Karenina

She didn’t leave any money.

— Pedro Páramo

Levin knew that his older brother had little interest in farming and that he asked about it only as a concession to him, and therefore he answered only about the sales of wheat and about money.

— Anna Karenina

I could lose money entering into such a transaction for the first time….Maybe you’re fooling me, my good sir, and they’re really worth more.

— Dead Souls

But if one tries to get the general human element out of them—that which is common to them all—there are actually only three things that can be left over: stupidity, money, or, at the most, a trace of religious memory.

— The Man Without Qualities

In any case, we’ll have money.

— Anna Karenina

All he left his son were four completely worn-out vests, two old lamb’s-wool-lined coats, and a small sum of money.

— Dead Souls

Within a very short time after he had sent out his statement to the press, His Highness believed he noticed that all the people who have no money make up for it by having an unpleasant crank tucked away somewhere inside them.

— The Man Without Qualities

“That is the money from your yams,” he said.

— Things Fall Apart
death

Think of Death and the Judgment then?

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

From that moment when, at the sight of his beloved brother dying, Levin had looked at the questions of life and death for the first time through those new convictions, as he called them, which imperceptibly, during the period from twenty to thirty-four years of age, had come to replace his childhood and adolescent beliefs, he had been horrified, not so much at death as at life without the slightest knowledge of whence it came, wherefore, why, and what it was.

— Anna Karenina

She was near death, and I would have promised her anything.

— Pedro Páramo

Death seems the only desirable sequel for a career like this; but Death is only a launching into the region of the strange Untried; it is but the first salutation to the possibilities of the immense Remote, the Wild, the Watery, the Unshored; therefore, to the death-longing eyes of such men, who still have left in them some interior compunctions against suicide, does the all-contributed and all-receptive ocean alluringly spread forth his whole plain of unimaginable, taking terrors, and wonderful, new-life adventures; and from the hearts of infinite Pacifics, the thousand mermaids sing to them—“Come hither, broken-hearted; here is another life without the guilt of intermediate death; here are wonders supernatural, without dying for them.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

This evil had been sufficiently fenced against by the prudent care of the Yorick’s family,  and their religious preservation of these records I quote, which do further inform us, That the family was originally of Danish extraction, and had been transplanted into England as early as in the reign of Horwendillus, king of Denmark, in whose court it seems, an ancestor of this Mr. Yorick’s, and from whom he was lineally descended, held a considerable post to the day of his death.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

He did not see anything impossible or incongruous in the notion that death, which existed for unbelievers, did not exist for him, and that since he possessed the fullest faith, of the measure of which he himself was the judge, there was no sin in his soul and he already experienced full salvation here on earth.

— Anna Karenina

You will hear the voice of my memories stronger than the voice of my death — that is, if death ever had a voice.

— Pedro Páramo

For me death cannot end my woes.

— Metamorphoses

The terrible thing in this sort of grief is that, unlike anything else — a loss, a death — one cannot simply bear one’s cross.

— Anna Karenina

Your death I caused, who bade you, piteous girl,

Alone, at night, go to this place of fear,

And came not first myself.

— Metamorphoses

In life, Ashe was afflicted with unreality, as so many Englishmen are; in death, he is not even the ghost he was in life.

— Ficciones

Old age is always wakeful; as if, the longer linked with life, the less man has to do with aught that looks like death.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

‘Yes, I heard … Such a sudden death,’ said Levin.

— Anna Karenina

And as for small difficulties and worryings, prospects of sudden disaster, peril of life and limb; all these, and death itself, seem to him only sly, good-natured hits, and jolly punches in the side bestowed by the unseen and unaccountable old joker.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

And, as for me, if, by any possibility, there be any as yet undiscovered prime thing in me; if I shall ever deserve any real repute in that small but high hushed world which I might not be unreasonably ambitious of; if hereafter I shall do anything that, upon the whole, a man might rather have done than to have left undone; if, at my death, my executors, or more properly my creditors, find any precious MSS. in my desk, then here I prospectively ascribe all the honor and the glory to whaling; for a whale-ship was my Yale College and my Harvard.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

He poured—unthanked—sweet perfumes on her breast,

Gave her a loving last embrace, and mourned

With all due obsequies her death undue.

— Metamorphoses

He belittled Perseus’ praise

And even claimed Medusa’s death a lie.

— Metamorphoses

He sometimes takes the great Folio whales by the lip, and hangs there like a leech, till the mighty brute is worried to death.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

And you, strange tree, whose boughs one body shade

And soon shall shade another, keep for aye

The marks of death, your fruit funereal,

Most fit for grief the pledge of our twin blood.

— Metamorphoses

He did not believe in death generally and especially not in her death, though Lydia Ivanovna had told him and his father had confirmed it, and therefore, even after he was told that she was dead, he looked for her during his walks.

— Anna Karenina

From her mouth bubbled a sound very like a death rattle.

— Pedro Páramo

When close to the whale, in the very death-lock of the fight, he handle his unpitying lance cooly and off-handedly, as a whistling tinker his hammer.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

And another memory, and another, until that death was erased from memory and there was no longer anyone to remember it.

— Pedro Páramo

And this death, which here, in his beloved brother, moaning in his sleep and calling by habit, without distinction, now on God, now on the devil, was not at all as far off as it had seemed to him before.

— Anna Karenina

‘A bit of a hypocrite?’ Mr Bankes suggested, looking, too, at Mr Ramsey’s back, for was he not thinking of his friendship, and of Cam refusing to give him a flower, and of all those boys and girls, and his own house, full of comfort, but, since his wife’s death, quiet rather?

— To the Lighthouse

And on the days on which she happened to be once more kind and affectionate towards him, had shown him some thoughtful attention, he recorded these deceptive signs of a chance of feeling on her part with the fond and skeptical solicitude, the desperate joy of people who, nursing a friend in the last days of an incurable illness, relate as facts of infinitely precious insignificance: “Yesterday he went through his accounts himself, and actually corrected a mistake we had made in adding them up; he ate and egg today and seemed quite to enjoy it, and if he digests it properly we shall try him with a cutlet tomorrow”—although they themselves know that these things are meaningless on the eve of an inevitable death.

— In Search of Lost Time

Men lived by spoil and plunder;

Friend was not safe from friend, nor father safe

From son-in-law, and kindness rare between

Brother and brother; husbands plotted death

For wives and wives for husbands; stepmothers

With murderous hearts brewed devilish aconite,

And sons, importunate to glut their greed,

Studied the stars to time their fathers’ death.

— Metamorphoses

It was a full gathering of umuada, in the same way as they would meet if a death occurred in the family.

— Things Fall Apart

Beneath the unclouded and mild azure sky, upon the fair face of the pleasant sea, wafted by the joyous breezes, that great mass of death floats on and on, till lost in infinite perspectives.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

‘I’ll have to go once more and make them understand that I’m down to my last mouthful, and if they don’t help me, I’m sure, in a way, to starve to death.’

— Dead Souls

Look! here, far water-locked; beyond all hum of human weal or woe; in these most candid and impartial seas; where to traditions no rocks furnish tablets; where for long Chinese ages, the billows have still rolled on speechless and unspoken to, as stars that shine upon the Niger’s unknown source; here, too, life dies sunwards full of faith; but see! no sooner dead, than death whirls round the corpse, and it heads some other way.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Fair for death and doom,—that’s fair for Moby Dick.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

The moment, the death I had kept conjuring up for three years was as simple as a bit of dry wood.

— Lolita