love
money
death
love

While down on earth as destiny ordained

These things took place, and Bacchus, babe twice born,

Was cradled safe and sound, it chanced that Jove,

Well warmed with nectar, laid his weighty cares

Aside and, Juno too in idle mood,

The pair were gaily joking, and Jove said

‘You women get more pleasure out of love

Than we men do, I’m sure.’

— Metamorphoses

By chance that day on Jason’s features shone

Uncommon grace; her love could find excuse.

— Metamorphoses

Love made him eloquent;

And, if at times he pressed his pleas too far,

Why, Procne wished it so; he even wept,

As if she’d ordered tears.

— Metamorphoses

Only for himself did he acknowledge the unquestionable right to love her.

— Anna Karenina

Third, that she should love him.

— Anna Karenina

With the utmost simplicity and clarity I now saw myself and my love.

— Lolita

For at such times desire, or love, would revive in him a feeling of vanity from which he was now quite free in his everyday life (although it was doubtless this feeling which had originally prompted him towards the career as a man of fashion in which he had squandered his intellectual gifts on frivolous amusements and made use of his erudition in matters of art only to advise society ladies what pictures to buy and how to decorate their houses), which made him eager to shine, in the eyes of any unknown beauty he had fallen for, with an elegance which the name Swann did not in itself imply.

— In Search of Lost Time

He knew it indubitably, as these things are always known to young men, so-called suitors, though he would never have dared say it to anyone, and he also knew that even though he wanted to get married, even though by all tokens this quite attractive girl would make a wonderful wife, he was as little capable of marrying her, even if he had not been in love with Kitty Shcherbatsky, as of flying into the sky.

— Anna Karenina

One is amused by the sophistry of self-love, but one ought to draw from it the conclusion that man cannot do anything evil at all.

— The Man Without Qualities

How should I love him?

— Anna Karenina

If he is tormented by religious doubts, as occasionally happens in youth, he goes straight over to the persecution of unbelievers; if love deranges him, he turns it into marriage; and if any other enthusiasm overwhelms him, he disentangles himself from the impossibility of living perpetually in the fire of it by beginning to live for that fire.

— The Man Without Qualities

My Love’s striped, black-and-white, cotton frock, jaunty blue cap, white socks and brown moccasins were not quite in keeping with the large beautifully cut aquamarine on a silver chainlet, which gemmed her throat: a spring rain gift from me.

— Lolita

How the look of my dear love’s name even affixed to some old hag of an actress, still makes me rock with helpless pain!

— Lolita

The letter was dated September 18, 1952 (this was September 22), and the address she gave was ‘General Delivery, Coalmont’ (not ‘Va.’ not ‘Pa.’ not ‘Tenn.’ — and not Coalmont, anyway — I have camouflaged everything, my love).

— Lolita

‘If I didn’t love you,’ said Darya Alexandrovna, and tears welled up in her eyes, ‘if I didn’t know you as I do … ’

— Anna Karenina

But since he was in love with Odette, since he was in the habit of turning all his thoughts towards her, the pity with which he might have been inspired for himself he felt for her instead, and he murmured: “Poor darling!”

— In Search of Lost Time

I love my daughter with one love and her with another.

— Anna Karenina

Should he give her love to Carrie?

— To the Lighthouse

And the further it goes, the more I love her.

— Anna Karenina

I have the highest idea of the spiritual and refined sentiments of this reverend gentleman, from this single stroke in his character, which I think comes up to any of the honest refinements of the peerless knight of La Mancha, whom, by the bye, with all his follies, I love more, and would actually have gone further to have paid a visit to, than the greatest hero of antiquity.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

The Vlasyev girl is completely in love with him.

— Anna Karenina

Though he had thought that he had the most precise notions of family life, he had, like all men, involuntarily pictured it to himself only as the enjoyment of love, which nothing should hinder and from which trifling cares should not detract.

— Anna Karenina

Now still

As birds they keep their former eloquence,

Their endless raucous chattering, as each

Indulges in her passionate love of speech.

— Metamorphoses

An unattractive, kindly man like himself might, he supposed, be loved as a friend, but to be loved with the love he himself felt for Kitty, one had to be a handsome — and above all a special — man.

— Anna Karenina

And so, at an age when it would appear—since one seeks in love before everything else a subjective pleasure—that the taste for a woman’s beauty must play the largest part in it, love may come into being, love of the most physical kind, without any foundation in desire.

— In Search of Lost Time

‘Would you like to work for this common cause and love this set task as he does, and only that?’

— Anna Karenina

Entering Kitty’s small boudoir, a pretty little pink room, with vieux saxe dolls as young, pink and gay as Kitty had been just two months earlier, Dolly remembered with what gaiety and love they had decorated this little room together last year.

— Anna Karenina

His love of talk had grown with age and sickness.

— Things Fall Apart

I know nothing more simultaneously false and telling than the statement by Leonardo da Vinci that we cannot love or hate something until we’ve understood it.

— The Book of Disquiet

‘If you love me as you say you do,’ she whispered, ‘make it so that I am at peace.’

— Anna Karenina

But if the thought of actors preoccupied me so, if the sight of Maubant coming out of the Théâtre-Française one afternoon had plunged me into the throes and sufferings of love, how much more did the name of a star blazing outside the doors of a theatre, how much more, seen through the window of a brougham passing by in the street, its horses’ headbands decked with roses, did the face of a woman whom I took to be and actress, leave me in a state of troubled excitement, impotently and painfully trying to form a picture of her private life.

— In Search of Lost Time

Honour and love lay vanquished, and from earth,

With slaughter soaked, Justice, virgin divine,

The last of the immortals, fled away.

— Metamorphoses

Of course I was worried about Father, who was so far gone in love that he looked like wrecking the whole family.

— The Man Without Qualities
money

All those people make their money, as our old tax farmers used to, in a way that earns them people’s contempt.

— Anna Karenina

He was indeed displeased, not that a lot of money had been spent, but that he was reminded of something which he, knowing that things were not right, had wished to forget.

— Anna Karenina

Arnheim, he said, had bought him in order some day to sell him back to the prince for a frightful lot of money, but he was going to run away and had only not been able to do it before this because it was so far to where his father lived.

— The Man Without Qualities

Think of all the times he’d taken money from his own pocket to keep the girls quiet.

— Pedro Páramo

Mikhailov, excited by his visitors, now found the talk of money very unpleasant.

— Anna Karenina

The first thing Vronsky attacked, being the easiest, was money matters.

— Anna Karenina

The second instalment of the merchant’s money for the wood had been received and was not yet all spent, Dolly had been very sweet and kind lately, and the thought of the dinner gladdened Stepan Arkadyich in all respects.

— Anna Karenina

He merely handed Alexei Alexandrovich the money he needed and gave a brief report on the state of his affairs, which was not entirely good, because it so happened that, having gone out frequently that year, they had spent more and there was a deficit.

— Anna Karenina

For he would entertain on a shoestring, and in contrast to the normal habits of the Genoese (who are wont to dress in the height of fashion), he would sooner go about in rags than spend any money on his personal appearance.

— The Decameron

And believe me, I’m losing money at that price.

— Dead Souls

And once they had been coming, but had put off coming, what with the war, and travel being so difficult these days; they had never come all these years; just sent her money; but never wrote, never came, and expected to find things as they had left them, ah dear!

— To the Lighthouse

And me, I provide the money.

— The Stranger

‘That was a trivial matter,’ said the friar, ‘and you did well to dispose of the money as you did.’

— The Decameron

The forgery of paper money, the abduction of the governor’s daughter, the death of the public prosecutor he was supposed to have caused, the arrival of a new governor general—it all gave him a considerable fright.

— Dead Souls

If I say it, then I have to be ready for it, that is, to have money and resign from the service.

— Anna Karenina

She had it on the tip of her tongue to say, as they strolled, ‘It’ll cost fifty pounds’, but instead, for her heart failed her about money, she talked about Jasper shooting birds, and he said, at once, soothing her instantly, that it was natural in a boy, and he trusted he would find betters ways of amusing himself before long.

— To the Lighthouse

But, unfortunately, no amount of money and property, with or without improvements, is exchangeable for a stomach like this gentleman’s, who is otherwise a lesser type.

— Dead Souls

The money?

— Dead Souls

“Particularly where money is concerned!” Arnheim said swiftly.

— The Man Without Qualities

He had shown off his money.

— The Stranger

So many fears had been lived through, so many thoughts thought, so much money spent, so many confrontations with her husband when the older two, Darya and Natalya, were being married!

— Anna Karenina

A little money that had come my way after my father’s death (nothing very grand — the Mirana had been sold long before), in addition to my striking if somewhat brutal good looks, allowed me to enter upon my quest with equanimity.

— Lolita

“My good woman,” he said, “either you simply refuse to understand my words or you’re just talking for the sake of talking….I’m giving you money: fifteen rubles in bills.”

— Dead Souls

The fact is—in every profession that is followed not for the sake of money but for love, there comes a moment when the advancing years seem to be leading into the void.

— The Man Without Qualities

He did not know that feeling of change she was experiencing after living at home, where she would sometimes want cabbage with kvass or sweets, and could not have either, while now she could order whatever she liked, buy heaps of sweets, spend any amount of money and order any pastry she wanted.

— Anna Karenina

But she, just as she had supposed that his refusal to send her money was only a sham, saw nothing but a pretext in the questions he was now coming to ask her, about the repainting of her carriage or the purchase of shares.

— In Search of Lost Time

Saladin, whose worth was so great that it raised him from humble beginnings to the sultanate of Egypt and brought him many victories over Saracen and Christian kings, had expended the whole of his treasure in various wars and extraordinary acts of munificence, when a certain situation arose for which he required a vast sum of money.

— The Decameron

He had not wanted to believe that the three faces suddenly staring out of the night at him in anger and contempt were only after his money, but gave himself up to a feeling that it was hatred that had here condensed and materialised against him.

— The Man Without Qualities

Had he money enough to buy tobacco?

— To the Lighthouse

Levin knew that his older brother had little interest in farming and that he asked about it only as a concession to him, and therefore he answered only about the sales of wheat and about money.

— Anna Karenina

Of money there was none.

— Anna Karenina

The white man had indeed brought a lunatic religion, but he had also built a trading store and for the first time palm-oil and kernel became things of great price, and much money flowed into Umuofia.

— Things Fall Apart

I married her with my money and my yams.

— Things Fall Apart
death

He belittled Perseus’ praise

And even claimed Medusa’s death a lie.

— Metamorphoses

A moment later she added, inarticulate with rage: “No, but, don’t you agree, the filthy creature…” unwittingly using, perhaps in obedience to the same obscure need to justify herself—like Françoise at Combray, when the chicken refused to die—the very words which the last convulsions of an inoffensive animal in its death throes wring from the peasant who is engaged in taking its life.

— In Search of Lost Time

Understanding clearly then for the first time that for every man and for himself nothing lay ahead but suffering, death and eternal oblivion, he decided that it was impossible to live that way, that he had either to explain his life so that it did not look like the wicked mockery of some devil, or shoot himself.

— Anna Karenina

A short life to them, and a jolly death.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

The doctor and his colleagues said it was puerperal fever, which in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred ends in death.

— Anna Karenina

But not only did each of these famous whales enjoy great individual celebrity—nay, you may call it an ocean-wide renown; not only was he famous in life and now is immortal in forecastle stories after death, but he was admitted into all the rights, privileges, and distinctions of a name; had as much a name indeed as Cambyses or Cæsar.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

He had expected that he himself would experience the same feeling of pity at losing his beloved brother and of horror in the face of death that he had experienced then, only to a greater degree.

— Anna Karenina

For if in the course of what has been a long career I have had occasion to call for the death penalty, never as strongly as today have I felt this painful duty made easier, lighter, clearer by the certain knowledge of a sacred imperative and by the horror I feel when I look into a man’s face and all I see is a monster.

— The Stranger

“That death pained me in more ways than one,” said Terencio Lubianes.

— Pedro Páramo

And as for small difficulties and worryings, prospects of sudden disaster, peril of life and limb; all these, and death itself, seem to him only sly, good-natured hits, and jolly punches in the side bestowed by the unseen and unaccountable old joker.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

At different times he would give fifty humorous and opposite reasons for riding a meek-spirited jade of a broken-winded horse, preferably to one of mettle;—for on such a one he could sit mechanically, and meditate as delightfully de vanitate mundi et fugâ sæculi, as with the advantage of a death’s head before him;—that, in all other exercitations, he could spend his time, as he rode slowly along,——to as much account as in his study;—that he could draw up an argument in his sermon,—or a hole in his breeches, as steadily on the one as in the other;—that brisk trotting and slow argumentation, like wit and judgment, were two incompatible movements.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

After the death of Ekwefi’s second child, Okonkwo had gone to a medicine man, who was also a diviner of the Afa Oracle, to inquire what was amiss.

— Things Fall Apart

Please don’t let me be tortured and put to death.

— The Decameron

It was extremely impersonal; it said something about death; it said very little about love.

— To the Lighthouse

If you really wish to triumph in your mind over the idea of death —’ ‘Ray,’ said Lo for hurray, and languidly left the room, and for a long while I stared with smarting eyes into the fire.

— Lolita

He is petty, selfish, vain, egotistical; he is spoilt; he is a tyrant; he wears Mrs Ramsay to death; but he has what you (she addressed Mr Bankes) have not; a fiery unworldliness; he knows nothing about trifles; he loves dogs and his children.

— To the Lighthouse

Yet habit—strange thing! what cannot habit accomplish?—Gayer sallies, more merry mirth, better jokes, and brighter repartees, you never heard over your mahogany, than you will hear over the half-inch white cedar of the whale-boat, when thus hung in hangman’s nooses; and, like the six burghers of Calais before King Edward, the six men composing the crew pull into the jaws of death, with a halter around every neck, as you may say.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Now he was no longer thinking about death at all.

— Anna Karenina

But the more he strained to think, the clearer it became to him that it was undoubtedly so, that he had actually forgotten, overlooked in his life one small circumstance — that death would come and everything would end, that it was not worth starting anything and that nothing could possibly be done about it.

— Anna Karenina

On life and death this old man walked.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Start her, Tash, my boy—start her, all; but keep cool, keep cool—cucumbers is the word—easy, easy—only start her like grim death and grinning devils, and raise the buried dead perpendicular out of their graves, boys—that’s all.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

It was his death stroke.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

“He’s starved his people to death, the lousy pig.”

— Dead Souls

What drives me insane is the two-fold nature of this nymphet — of every nymphet, perhaps; this mixture in my Lolita of tender dreamy childishness and a kind of eerie vulgarity, stemming from the snub-nosed cuteness of ads and magazine pictures, from the blurry pinkness of adolescent maidservants in the Old Country (smelling of crushed daisies and sweat); and from very young harlots disguised as children in provincial brothels; and then again, all this gets mixed up with the exquisite stainless tenderness seeping through the musk and the mud, through the dirt and the death, oh God, oh God.

— Lolita

‘He’ll be the death of her,’ Betsy said in a meaningful whisper.

— Anna Karenina

Is it not ludicrous that chance should dictate a person’s death while the circumstances of that death—whether private or public, whether drawn out for an hour or a century—should not be subject to chance?

— Ficciones

‘No, no,’ she began, ‘I’m not afraid of him, I’m afraid of death.

— Anna Karenina

He did not consider himself wise, but he could not help knowing that he was more intelligent than his wife or Agafya Mikhailovna, and he could not help knowing that when he thought about death, he thought about it with all the forces of his soul.

— Anna Karenina

So there with angry hands she broke the ploughs

That turned the soil and sent to death alike

The farmer and his labouring ox, and bade

The fields betray their trust, and spoilt the seeds.

— Metamorphoses

So close to death, Maman must have felt free then and ready to live it all again.

— The Stranger

Nor is death sad for death will end my sorrow;

Would he I love might live a long tomorrow!

— Metamorphoses

On the other hand, the precision that the psychiatrists displayed in their attitude to the great question whether or not it was permissible to condemn Moosbrugger to death was entirely and wholly exact, for it did not presume to say more than that the clinical picture he presented corresponded exactly to no clinical picture observed hitherto, and left the further decision to the lawyers.

— The Man Without Qualities

No sooner had the one mystery of death been accomplished before his eyes, and gone unfathomed, than another arose, equally unfathomed, which called to love and life.

— Anna Karenina