love
money
death
love

But at the period when I was in love with Gilberte, I still believed that Love did really exist outside ourselves; that, allowing us at the most to surmount the obstacles in our way, it offered its blessings in an order to which we were not free to make the least alteration; it seemed to me that if I had, on my own initiative, substituted for the sweetness of avowal a pretence of indifference, I should not only have been depriving myself of one of the joys for which I most longed, but fabricating, quite arbitrarily, a love that was artificial and valueless, that bore no relation to the true one, whose mysterious and foreordained ways I should thus have ceased to follow.

— In Search of Lost Time

I regretted keenly her mistake about my private aesthetics, for I simply love that tinge of Botticellian pink, that raw rose about the lips, those wet, matted eyelashes; and, naturally, her bashful whim deprived me of many opportunities of specious consolation.

— Lolita

“If I love him too much it is because he has been used so ill:”—there was a voice within her saying this to some imagined audience in the library, when the door was opened, and she saw Will before her.

— Middlemarch

And before Swann had time to understand what was happening and say to himself: “It’s the little phrase from Vinteuil’s sonata—I mustn’t listen!”, all his memories of the days when Odette had been in love with him, which he had succeeded until that moment in keeping invisible in the depths of his being, deceived by this sudden reflection of a season of love whose sun, they supposed, had dawned again, had awakened from their slumber, had taken wing and risen to sing maddeningly in his ears, without pity for his present desolation, the forgotten strains of happiness.

— In Search of Lost Time

She merely repeated what the counsel in her heart for the party opposed to love had been telling her all week long.

— The Red and the Black

Certainly, of the extent of this love Swann had no direct awareness.

— In Search of Lost Time

I hope you will love your baby.

— Lolita

“It’ll bring you good luck in love.”

— Zorba the Greek

He felt most painfully the desire to be enclosed, together with her, with her inside some order, some pattern of things, instead of drifting along in this open and unbounded delusion of love and of private anarchy.

— The Man Without Qualities

And they had visions of life together, full only of love, a love rich enough to people any desert, a life of transcendental joys, free of trials or tribulations, where time would vanish in an endless outpouring of feeling, glowing with a radiance as sublime as the stars in their heavens.

— A Sentimental Education

Surprised at such an extraordinary token of love, he gazed at her passionately for she had seemed very pretty to him during breakfast.

— The Red and the Black

He knew very well that she was not sufficiently in love with him to be so keenly distressed merely at having missed his visit, but since she was good-natured, anxious to make him happy, and often grieved when she had offended him, he found it quite natural that she should be sorry on this occasion for having deprived him of the pleasure of spending an hour in her company, which was so very great, if not for her, at any rate for him.

— In Search of Lost Time

Or linger a while in this bower, where my love rested herself, but which she has now deserted?

— The Recognition of Śakuntalā

The prosecutor, however, allowed my client love and then proceeded, in his usual way, to give us a psychological description of the mental state of the accused: he was drunk, we were told, he was like a criminal who is being taken to his execution but feels he still has a lot of time ahead of him, etc., etc.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Dorothea, my love, this is not the first occasion, but it were well that it should be the last, on which you have assumed a judgment on subjects beyond your scope.

— Middlemarch

And the same could be said of fidelity, which, when confined to one woman, takes on a nuance of narrowness; the same could be said likewise of chivalry and gentleness, unselfishness and delicacy, all of them virtues that are generally imagined in association with women, but which thereby lose their richest quality, so that it is difficult to say whether the experience of love only flows towards a woman as water concentrates in the deepest and generally not most unobjectionable spot, or whether the experience of love for women is the volcanic center in the warmth of which all things live that flourish upon the surface of the earth.

— The Man Without Qualities

Ah, they love fancy phrases, these people!

— The Brothers Karamazov

She began a better sister than a mother,

Determined to appease with blood the shades

Whose blood was hers, for love’s sake crushing love.

— Metamorphoses

But as wax melts before a gentle fire,

Or morning frosts beneath the rising sun,

So, by love wasted, slowly he dissolves

By hidden fire consumed.

— Metamorphoses

An American G.I. in love with an English girl.

— The Golden Notebook

A child needs sunshine, he needs to play with other children, he needs someone to set him a good example, and above all he needs love, even if it is only a tiny drop of love…

— The Brothers Karamazov

There was someone once, also an army officer—she fell in love with him and gave herself to him.

— The Brothers Karamazov

“There are moments when people love crime,” Alyosha said thoughtfully.

— The Brothers Karamazov

But what a blessing it is for the son of my father and mother to love a girl who has no relations, and who can never bother herself, or anybody else, about her family!

— Great Expectations

You don’t love me, you love another woman!

— Anna Karenina

She stood there, looking at words like love, friendship, duty, responsibility, and knew them to be all lies.

— The Golden Notebook

‘No, she does not and cannot love him,’ he decided to himself.

— Anna Karenina

On their return, new pretexts were discovered: the young man hadn’t got a proper job, this ‘deep love’ of his somehow lacked conviction; nothing would be lost by waiting.

— A Sentimental Education

In love as in commerce, in science as in the long jump, one has to have faith before one can win, before one can reach one’s aim, and it would be an odd thing if this were not true of life as a whole.

— The Man Without Qualities

The words she used to herself were: I won’t sleep with a man until I know I could love him.

— The Golden Notebook

In short, he felt himself to be in love in the right place, and was ready to endure a great deal of predominance, which, after all, a man could always put down when he liked.

— Middlemarch

In long-winded frenzy she asked him questions and more questions, now at the top of her lungs: Did he love her, had he been faithful, and so on.

— Journey to the End of the Night

He had more affairs but the ever-present memory of his first love made them insipid; in any case, desire had lost its edge, the very springs of feeling had dried up.

— A Sentimental Education
money

And a very handsome sum of money too, I think.

— Great Expectations

Money to live on!

— Journey to the End of the Night

You’ll get your money next Sunday, never fear!

— A Sentimental Education

And this Hospital is a capital piece of work, due entirely to Mr. Bulstrode’s exertions, and in a great degree to his money.

— Middlemarch

I mean the rag you sewed the money in?

— The Brothers Karamazov

I’ve told Sokolov to sell the wheat and take money in advance for the mill.

— Anna Karenina

Neither did she ever give me any money or anything but my daily dinner—nor even stipulate that I should be paid for my services.

— Great Expectations

Whereupon the two brothers made all necessary arrangements, using his own money to see that he had an honourable funeral, and sending news of his death to the friars and asking them to come that evening to observe the customary vigil, and the following morning to take away the body.

— The Decameron

And he didn’t want my money, although it would have been safe to get; why should he want the estate’s money, which is so dangerous to get?

— Children of Gebelawi

In saying that you are thinking primarily of money and of your parents.

— The Man Without Qualities

I make a lot of money in my business.

— The Red and the Black

When she looked in the glass and saw her hair grey, her cheek sunk, at fifty, she thought, possibly she might have managed things better—her husband; money; his books.

— To the Lighthouse

But when the prosecutor asked her to specify which money he had had in mind—what he had that night or the three thousand that had been spent on the previous occasion, a month before, she said that she had understood him to mean the money spent on the first occasion.

— The Brothers Karamazov

‘I’ll sail with ye,’—he says,—‘the passage money, how much is that?—I’ll pay now.’

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

It was true that the association with this man had been fatal to him—true that if he had had the thousand pounds still in his hands with all his debts unpaid he would have returned the money to Bulstrode, and taken beggary rather than the rescue which had been sullied with the suspicion of a bribe (for, remember, he was one of the proudest among the sons of men)—nevertheless, he would not turn away from this crushed fellow mortal whose aid he had used, and make a pitiful effort to get acquittal for himself by howling against another.

— Middlemarch

You’ll find some money in the flowerpot in the hall.

— Pedro Páramo

For if a man has money, all he has to do is to wish for something and he’ll get it.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Knowing he was an illegitimate son of Fyodor Karamazov—and we have evidence that he knew it—Smerdyakov was bitter about his position as compared with that of Fyodor Karamazov’s legitimate sons, who, he felt, had everything while he had nothing, who would inherit their father’s money while he, Smerdyakov, was doomed to remain a cook all his life.

— The Brothers Karamazov

“Not but what Trumbull has made money.”

— Middlemarch

We must add that, in saying this, he had also in mind a certain French soap that imparted an extraordinary whiteness to the skin and a freshness to the cheeks; he couldn’t remember the name for love or money, but, according to his conjectures, it was to be found near the frontier.

— Dead Souls

Now, when horses were needed both for the departing princess and for the midwife, this was difficult for Levin, but by the duty of hospitality he could not allow Darya Alexandrovna to hire horses while in his house, and, besides, he knew that the twenty roubles Darya Alexandrovna would be asked to pay for the trip were very important for her; and he felt Darya Alexandrovna’s money matters, which were in a very bad state, as if they were his own.

— Anna Karenina

I wish you to know that under no circumstances would I have lowered myself by—under no circumstances would I have given men the chance of saying that I sought money under the pretext of seeking—something else.

— Middlemarch

I’m paying for other men’s pleasures with my money.

— In Search of Lost Time

I’ll tell you the story behind that money now, and I beg you, I beseech you, to hear me out to the end!

— The Brothers Karamazov

It was because Vatnez had that very day presented her with a long overdue IOU and she’d gone round to Arnoux’s to get some money.

— A Sentimental Education

He laid the rent he owed—five back weeks, for he was bad about money, on the table.

— The Golden Notebook

——What—without leave—without money——without governor? cried my father in amazement.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Unoka was, of course, a debtor, and he owed every neighbor some money, from a few cowries to quite substantial amounts.

— Things Fall Apart

“I’ve saved up money!” he cried out suddenly.

— The Red and the Black

“Harbor fees are so dreadfully costly!” they kept saying, sincerely distressed, as if it had been their own money.

— Journey to the End of the Night

The long and short of it is, somebody has told old Featherstone, giving you as the authority, that Fred has been borrowing or trying to borrow money on the prospect of his land.

— Middlemarch

She sat down in the library before her particular little heap of books on political economy and kindred matters, out of which she was trying to get light as to the best way of spending money so as not to injure one’s neighbors, or—what comes to the same thing—so as to do them the most good.

— Middlemarch

Such people as you and I—how could we hold on to money?

— The Brothers Karamazov
death

I’d have sworn they had a contract, death and Captain Ortolan.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Then, relapsing into a somber reverie, she would say: “Hell would be a blessing for me; I would still have a few days to spend with him on earth; but hell in this world, the death of my children—

— The Red and the Black

Franz has Death’s word in his mouth, and no one will tear it away from him, he turns it in his mouth and it is a stone, a stony kind of stone, no nourishment spills from it.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

Lower down, in the musty undergrowth, big heavy butterflies, bordered like death notices, quivered with the effort of opening their wings, and lower still it was us, sloshing through the yellow mud.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Think of Death and the Judgment then?

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

‘I deserve worse than death.’

— Children of Gebelawi

The whore of Babylon has lost, Death has won, and drums her away.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

The excessiveness of my contrition and of my despair would be taken by Valenod and all the patricians of the region for an ignoble fear of death; they are so proud, those faint heroes whose wealth sets them above temptation!

— The Red and the Black

But Teodoro Trivulzio opposed this, and chose rather to pass by main force with the risks of battle; it was not fitting, he said, that he who in life had never been afraid of his enemies should have the appearance of fearing them in death.

— Essays

I had a death sentence hanging over me, and I was in love.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Perhaps if the year were 1447 instead of 1947 I might have hoodwinked my gentle nature by administering her some classical poison from a hollow agate, some tender philter of death.

— Lolita

The death close before me was terrible, but far more terrible than death was the dread of being misremembered after death.

— Great Expectations

He could not think of it because, when he imagined what was to be, he could not rid himself of the thought that death would resolve at a stroke all the difficulty of his situation.

— Anna Karenina

That sense of death evoked in them all by his farewell to life on the night he summoned his brother was destroyed.

— Anna Karenina

And yet everything was somehow summed up into a whole: the highroads, the towns, the gendarmes and the birds, the dead and his own death.

— The Man Without Qualities

——To us, Jonathan, who know not what want or care is—who live here in the service of two of the best of masters—(bating in my own case his majesty King William the Third, whom I had the honour to serve both in Ireland and Flanders)—I own it, that from Whitsontide to within three weeks of Christmas,—’tis not long—’tis like nothing;—but to those, Jonathan, who know what death is, and what havock and destruction he can make, before a man can well wheel about—’tis like a whole age.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

The passion of sending us to our death put a little color into his diaphanous cheeks.

— Journey to the End of the Night

You’ll be the death of me yet, mother!

— The Brothers Karamazov

Rifaa enjoyed in his death an honour and respect and love that he had never dreamed of while alive.

— Children of Gebelawi

“In judging of that tempestuous wind called Euroclydon,” says an old writer—of whose works I posses the only copy extant—“it maketh a marvelous difference, whether thou lookest out at it from a glass window where the frost is all on the outside, or whether thou observest it from that sashless window, where the frost is on both sides, and of which the wight Death is the only glazier.”

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Between them and us stands our fear, which will weigh on us until this thing ends one way or another and we can get back together, in death or life, with the other motherfuckers of this world.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Here were the sun and the gebel and the sands, majesty and love and death, and a heart in which love was dawning.

— Children of Gebelawi

The events of people’s lives have, after all, only to the least degree originated in them, having generally depended on all sorts of circumstances such as the moods, the life or death of quite different people, and have, as it were, only at the given point of time come hurrying towards them.

— The Man Without Qualities

It is possible that Gregory was naturally inclined toward mysticism so that the birth of his six-fingered son, followed by the boy’s death and another strange and unexpected event, “left a mark” on him, as he put it himself.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Unity of consciousness: this is the victory of the revolution over death, the end of History, and the birth of God!

— History

But he might be blamed for his own death, did he then run out of scruples so completely as to allow an innocent man to be blamed for the death of his former master?

— The Brothers Karamazov

But Death plucked down some virtuous elder brother, on whose whistling daily toil solely hung the responsibilities of some other family, and left the worse than useless old man standing, till the hideous rot of life should make him easier to harvest.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

“It will worret you to death, Lucy; that I can see,” said Mr. Vincy, more mildly.

— Middlemarch

Four times the crescent moon

Filled her round orb, four times from her full orb

She shrank and waned, and all that weary while

The hot south wind blew furnace blasts of death.

— Metamorphoses

But let my death come at the hand

Of one my wrong has injured.

— Metamorphoses

Death to cuties who stir up calamity!

— Journey to the End of the Night

Men lived by spoil and plunder;

Friend was not safe from friend, nor father safe

From son-in-law, and kindness rare between

Brother and brother; husbands plotted death

For wives and wives for husbands; stepmothers

With murderous hearts brewed devilish aconite,

And sons, importunate to glut their greed,

Studied the stars to time their fathers’ death.

— Metamorphoses

The prosecutor then rose and, very gravely and with what struck me as real emotion in his voice, his finger pointing at me, said slowly and distinctly, “Gentlemen of the jury, the day after his mother’s death, this man was out swimming, starting up a dubious liaison, and going to the movies, a comedy, for laughs.”

— The Stranger