love
money
death
love

Everyone had brought a present: Dittmer a Syrian stole, Rosenwald an album of love-songs, Burrieu a water-colour, Sombaz a cartoon of himself, and Pellerin a charcoal sketch representing a sort of Dance of Death, weird and gruesome, and rather poorly drawn.

— A Sentimental Education

But I don’t love her.

She did in fact play the piano beautifully at regimental festivities, with the glittering splendour of a well-gilded sun floating high over chasms of emotion, and from the very beginning Ulrich had fallen in love less with this woman’s sensual presence than with the idea of her.

— The Man Without Qualities

Dare I mention that upon returning to his room, Julien threw himself down on his knees and covered the love letters Prince Korasoff had given him with kisses?

— The Red and the Black

“ ’Tis strange to see the humors of these men,

These great aspiring spirits, that should be wise;

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For being the nature of great spirits to love

To be where they may be most eminent;

They, rating of themselves so farre above

Us in conceit, with whom they do frequent,

Imagine how we wonder and esteeme

All that they do or say; which makes them strive

To make our admiration more extreme,

Which they suppose they cannot, ‘less they give

Notice of their extreme and highest thoughts.”

— Middlemarch

The calendar hath not an evil day

For souls made one by love, and even death

Were sweetness, if it came like rolling waves

While they two clasped each other and foresaw

No life apart.

— Middlemarch

‘You know I love you.’

— A Sentimental Education

Swann referred back to it as to a conception of love and happiness whose distinctive character he recognized at once as he would that of the Princesse de Clèves, or of René, should either of those titles occur to him.

— In Search of Lost Time

On the second outing, as he ran around the fields, Useppe turned up in the clearing among the trees where, at that moment, Nino and Patrizia, having just made love, were stretched out on the ground, resting.

— History

All the way I was miserable because I knew Saul was making love to Dorothy, whoever she was.

— The Golden Notebook

To any other type of tourist accommodation I soon grew to prefer the Functional Motel — clean, neat, safe nooks, ideal places for sleep, argument, reconciliation, insatiable illicit love.

— Lolita

He’s in love with her, so he says.

— The Golden Notebook

And yet you were writing and lecturing on a system of economics based on love not figures?

— Season of Migration to the North

A love that lived with a poignard in its heart… that was the thing.

— The Man Without Qualities

—But there is an instance, which I own puts me off my guard, and that is, when I see one born for great actions, and, what is still more for his honour, whose nature ever inclines him to good ones;- – – -when I behold such a one, my Lord, like yourself, whose principles and conduct are as generous and noble as his blood, and whom, for that reason, a corrupt world cannot spare one moment;—when I see such a one, my Lord, mounted, though it is but for a minute beyond the time which my love to my country has prescribed to him, and my zeal for his glory wishes;—then, my Lord, I cease to be a philosopher, and in the first transport of an honest impatience, I wish the HOBBY-HORSE, with all his fraternity, at the Devil.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

“What! is it possible that you no longer love me?” he said to her in one of those accents from the heart—so difficult to listen to and not be moved.

— The Red and the Black

And so all the odd changes which take place in the relations between the miller’s wife and the boy, changes which only the gradual dawning of love can explain, seemed to me steeped in a mystery the key to which (I readily believed) lay in that strange and mellifluous name of Champi, which invested the boy who bore it, I had no idea why, with its own vivid, ruddy, charming colour.

— In Search of Lost Time

And they flee by love’s wind carried, Peace and quiet have left them now, Hunted and pursued by justice, Solemnly they take this vow: Freely let us both surrender.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

Love her!

— Great Expectations

And, despite that, he felt that when his love was stronger, he might have torn that love from his heart, had he strongly wished to do so, but now, when it seemed to him, as it did at that moment, that he felt no love for her, he knew that his bond with her could not be broken.

— Anna Karenina

I love life, you know.

— The Brothers Karamazov

But the presence of Odette continued to sow in Swann’s heart alternate seeds of love and suspicion.

— In Search of Lost Time

Immediately he set about transcribing this first love letter; it was a homily filled with stock phrases about virtue, and a deadly bore.

— The Red and the Black

Like many a plucked idle young gentleman, he was thoroughly in love, and with a plain girl who had no money!

— Middlemarch

Keep me from loving him, if I ought not to love him.

— Sons and Lovers

I remember loving George for just that moment with a sharp painful love, while I called myself all kinds of a fool.

— The Golden Notebook

He was nine years old, he was a child; but he knew his own soul, it was dear to him, he protected it as the eyelid protects the eye, and did not let anyone into his soul without the key of love.

— Anna Karenina

He wouldn’t tell me anything, but it’s easy enough to read right into someone’s heart, when you love them, anything will do it—and, besides, there were warnings.

— Père Goriot

And so farewell, my dear brother: there’s never been a letter laden with more prayers for your happiness, nor one dispatched with as great a sense of fulfilled love.

— Père Goriot

But when she lived on to her fourth, fifth and sixth years, love returned once more to her mother, and, with love, anxiety.

— Things Fall Apart

That people should love like this, that Mr Bankes should feel this for Mrs Ramsey (she glanced at his musing) was helpful, was exalting.

— To the Lighthouse

He sure must have been in love with her, your father!

— The Brothers Karamazov

“Love you.”

— Sons and Lovers
money

When Ali Bey stayed the night with me—what a moustache, what eyebrows, what arms he had!—he’d call to the tambourine and flute players and throw them money through the window, so that they’d play in my courtyard until dawn.

— Zorba the Greek

Kikuko had no doubt borrowed money from her family.

— The Sound of the Mountain

Don’t you see, I’ve got to get better, because they have to have money, and I know where to go to get it.

— Père Goriot

Jerry held the hat containing the money.

— Sons and Lovers

He said sometimes it wouldn’t talk without money.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

One of them, Zoklot, got into fights with one after another, until he had beaten them all and become chief of the whole alley, making all the others pay him protection money.

— Children of Gebelawi

Moreover, he was scared of his powers of invective, so much so that in order to placate him, he’d published his portrait in L’Art industriel together with an article praising him to the skies; and being more susceptible to fame than money, at about eight o’clock in came Pellerin, quite out of breath.

— A Sentimental Education

He had acquired his wealth through his investments on Monsieur Dambreuse’s behalf, for by lending money to people offering sound security on mortgages, he was able to ask for extra interest or commission and with his ever-watchful eye there was no capital risk.

— A Sentimental Education

I do believe you are better without the money.

— Middlemarch

All you ever think of is money …

— Journey to the End of the Night

But by now, with money or without, all the frontiers were closed; it was too late.

— History

He was the only son of a renowned Jew, notorious for the wealth he had acquired by lending money to kings to make war on their peoples.

— The Red and the Black

It showed a brave heart with one abiding passion left, the love of money.

— The Red and the Black

He said to me today, ‘Why should I waste money on a psychiatrist when I get treatment from you, free?’

— The Golden Notebook

The long and short of it is, somebody has told old Featherstone, giving you as the authority, that Fred has been borrowing or trying to borrow money on the prospect of his land.

— Middlemarch

He loved money, but he also loved to spend it in gratifying his peculiar tastes, and perhaps he loved it best of all as a means of making others feel his power more or less uncomfortably.

— Middlemarch

And when the townspeople see what has happened, they’ll create a commotion, not only because of our profession which they consider iniquitous and never cease to condemn, but also because they long to get their hands on our money, and they will go about shouting: “Away with these Lombard dogs that the Church refuses to accept”; and they’ll come running to our lodgings and perhaps, not content with stealing our goods, they’ll take away our lives into the bargain.

— The Decameron

Everybody was complaining about not earning enough money when in came a man of medium height wearing a coat fastened by a single button; he had bright eyes and a rather wild look.

— A Sentimental Education

Besides, you know, Mr. Karamazov, even if I had the money, I still wouldn’t give it to you.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Put away your money.

— The Brothers Karamazov

He ordered the wheat to be measured out, sent the steward to the merchant to get the money and went round the estate himself to give final orders before his departure.

— Anna Karenina

I couldn’ manage to k’leck dat money no way; en Balum he couldn’.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Bulstrode seems the most unsympathetic fellow I ever saw about some people, and yet he has taken no end of trouble, and spent a great deal of money, on benevolent objects.

— Middlemarch

More than once, he’d lent money both to Madame Vauquer and to some of her lodgers, but his debtors would sooner have died than not repay him, because for all his friendliness he had a look about him, deep, determined, that made people afraid.

— Père Goriot

You git me that money to-morrow—I want it.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

“I wanted to ask you, Mary—don’t you think that Mr. Featherstone—if you were to tell him—tell him, I mean, about apprenticing Alfred—would advance the money?”

— Middlemarch

Only this time, when Trifonov came back from the fair, he had no money to pay back, as I found out accidentally from his slobbering son and heir, the most depraved youth the world has ever seen.

— The Brothers Karamazov

The religion of the flag promptly replaced the cult of heaven, an old cloud which had already been deflated by the Reformation and reduced to a network of episcopal money boxes.

— Journey to the End of the Night

I can’t even give that child of mine money?

— The Golden Notebook

He little suspected with whose money.

— Great Expectations

It’s not about the money, no chance of that, he’s got his Mitzi, and then there’s his mate Herbert, the old windbag, the ram, he’s sitting pretty in their sty over there.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

About money, father?

— Middlemarch

“There are circumstances under which a financier must show the spirit of a Mæcenas!” Frau Klementine insisted, when her husband asserted violently that he had not taken on Hans Sepp, Gerda’s ‘spiritual guide’, as a tutor for her, spending his good money on him, only to have this come of it.

— The Man Without Qualities
death

The passion of sending us to our death put a little color into his diaphanous cheeks.

— Journey to the End of the Night

“My death will make her even more contemptuous of me!” he cried.

— The Red and the Black

And what this inevitable death was, he not only did not know, he not only had never thought of it, but he could not and dared not think of it.

— Anna Karenina

Heraclides Ponticus reports, admiringly, that Pythagoras recalled having been Pyrrhus, and before that, Euphorbus, and before that, some other mortal; in order to recall similar vicissitudes, I have no need of death, nor even of imposture.

— Ficciones

Nor is death sad for death will end my sorrow;

Would he I love might live a long tomorrow!

— Metamorphoses

It’s like keeping a man condemned to death for months with a noose around his neck, promising him maybe death, maybe mercy.

— Anna Karenina

The one-armed man is the subject of general interest, big excitement, the murder of his sweetheart, love life in the underworld, he went a little mad after her death, was suspected of complicity, tragic situation.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

‘You take it smoothly now,’ said I, ‘but you were very serious last night, when you swore it was Death.’

— Great Expectations

Within are shabby shelves, ranged round with old decanters, bottles, flasks; and in those jaws of swift destruction, like another cursed Jonah (by which name indeed they called him), bustles a little withered old man, who, for their money, dearly sells the sailors deliriums and death.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

But Sawaaris stood on the doorstep of the café, and the messengers of death lurked in every corner.

— Children of Gebelawi

Egypt, who had witnessed the death agony, would have also her part in the apotheosis: it would be the most secret and sombre part, and the harshest, for this country would play the eternal role of embalmer to his body.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

He needs to know what Death said.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

That kindly but distracted lady, hearing of the elder’s death upon awakening that morning, had been seized by such violent curiosity that she had at once delegated Rakitin to observe everything for her at the hermitage (since she could not be admitted herself) and to send her a “complete” written report every half hour of so.

— The Brothers Karamazov

For fear of death he had put himself under the Trustee’s protection and lost everything; and yet death had come—death, which destroyed life with fear even before it struck.

— Children of Gebelawi

Inside, all the wretches infected with the vice of death found employment, like their Führer, masters at last of living, helpless bodies for their perverse practices.

— History

The penitentiaries of the third order of saint Francis——the nuns of mount Calvary—the Præmonstratenses——the Clunienses—the Carthusians, and all the severer orders of nuns who lay that night in blankets or hair-cloth, were still in a worse condition than the abbess of Quedlingberg—by tumbling and tossing, and tossing and tumbling from one side of their beds to the other the whole night long—the several sisterhoods had scratch’d and mawl’d themselves all to death—they got out of their beds almost flead alive—every body thought saint Anthony had visited them for probation with his fire——they had never once, in short, shut their eyes the whole night long from vespers to matins.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Perseus turned

On him the blade Medusa’s death had proved

And plunged it in his breast; then, as he died,

His eyes that swam in death’s dark night looked round

For Athis, and he lay down by his side,

Solaced among the shades to share his death.

— Metamorphoses

Levin would have liked to talk with them, to hear what they said to their father, but Natalie turned to him, and just then Lvov’s colleague, Makhotin, in a court uniform, came into the room to fetch him, so that they could go together to meet someone, and now an endless conversation started about Herzegovina, Princess Korzinsky, the duma, and the unexpected death of Mme Apraksin.

— Anna Karenina

I’m with these poor slobs who have no books to show, who have no literature besides their own soul, and who are suffocating to death due to the fact they exist without having taken that mysterious, transcendental exam that makes one eligible to live.

— The Book of Disquiet

She remained in the coma for almost two weeks and two days ago she died without regaining consciousness and without pain they say and whatever they mean by that since it has always seemed to me that the only painless death must be that which takes the intelligence by violent surprise and from the rear so to speak since if death be anything at all beyond a brief and peculiar emotional state of the bereaved it must be a brief and likewise peculiar state of the subject as well and if aught can be more painful to any intelligence above that of a child or an idiot than a slow and gradual confronting with that which over a long period of bewilderment and dread it has been taught to regard as an irrevocable and unplumbable finality, I do not know it.

— Absalom, Absalom!

I am certain that when death appears to him he will smile in death’s face.

— Season of Migration to the North

The deceased often talked about you, she says, and left instructions that a santuri of his should be given to you after his death to help you to remember him.

— Zorba the Greek

And, as for me, if, by any possibility, there be any as yet undiscovered prime thing in me; if I shall ever deserve any real repute in that small but high hushed world which I might not be unreasonably ambitious of; if hereafter I shall do anything that, upon the whole, a man might rather have done than to have left undone; if, at my death, my executors, or more properly my creditors, find any precious MSS. in my desk, then here I prospectively ascribe all the honor and the glory to whaling; for a whale-ship was my Yale College and my Harvard.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Let us try, if we can, to enter into death with open eyes…

— Memoirs of Hadrian

What he needed after Zosima’s death was not miracles but “higher justice,” and he felt it had been violated.

— The Brothers Karamazov

He did brave men to death.

— Metamorphoses

And I foresee a long delay, for, my dear fellow, how should we learn of your death?

— The Red and the Black

“So you definitely assert that you are not guilty of the death of your father?” Nelyudov asked with gentle insistence.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Such people, after all, are on the best of terms with death and constantly need a few thousand dead in order to enjoy the moment of life with dignity.

— The Man Without Qualities

Not long afterwards, in Rome, the still-young Alfio followed his elderly friend in the destiny of death.

— History

Again he understood from her frightened eyes that this one way out, in her opinion, was death, and he did not let her finish.

— Anna Karenina

Death is the end for each of us; how can it give you pleasure?

— Children of Gebelawi

When he woke up, instead of the news of his brother’s death that he had expected, he learned that the sick man had reverted to his earlier condition.

— Anna Karenina