love
money
death
love

For love, in Paris, is unlike love anywhere else.

— Père Goriot

Well, let the son face his father and ask him: ‘Tell me, why should I love you?

— The Brothers Karamazov

He knew all the time that the love would take care of itself.

— Absalom, Absalom!

It was as if she could scarcely stand the shock of physical love, even a passionate kiss, and then he was too shrinking and sensitive to give it.

— Sons and Lovers

And now, love.

— Absalom, Absalom!

‘I think,’ said Anna, toying with the glove she had taken off, ‘I think … if there are as many minds as there are men, then there are as many kinds of love as there are hearts.’

— Anna Karenina

That now, having redeemed his guilt before her husband, he had to renounce her and never again stand between her with her repentance and her husband, was firmly resolved in his heart; but he could not tear out of his heart the regret at the loss of her love, could not erase from his memory the moments of happiness he had known with her, which he had valued so little then and which now pursued him in all their enchantment.

— Anna Karenina

‘Well then,’ said Mrs Ramsey, ‘we will cover it up,’ and they all watched her go to the chest of drawers, and open the little drawers quickly one after another, and not seeing anything that would do, she quickly took her own shawl off and wound it round the skull, round and round and round, and then she came back to Cam and laid her head almost flat on the pillow beside Cam’s and said how lovely it looked now; how the fairies would love it; it was like a bird’s nest; it was like a beautiful mountain such as she had seen abroad, with valleys and flowers and bells ringing and birds singing and little goats and antelopes . . . She could see the words echoing as she spoke them rhythmically in Cam’s mind, and Cam was repeating after her how it was like a mountain, a bird’s nest, a garden, and there were little antelopes, and her eyes were opening and shutting, and Mrs Ramsey went on saying still more monotonously, and more rhythmically and more nonsensically, how she must shut her eyes and go to sleep and dream of mountains and valleys and stars falling and parrots and antelopes and gardens, and everything lovely, she said, raising her head very slowly and speaking more and more mechanically, until she sat upright and saw that Cam was asleep.

— To the Lighthouse

Afterwards he would complain, half-bitter, half-humorous: ‘You didn’t love me at all, to being with.

— The Golden Notebook

I love you.

— The Red and the Black

This is what I want to know: you know that Katya—ah, she’s such a delightful, wonderful person, although I no longer know with whom she is in love…

— The Brothers Karamazov

Goriot’s totally irrational devotion to his daughters, his touchy, ticklish love for them, was so well known that, once, one of his rivals, wanting to make him leave the market so the other man could have the field all to himself, told him that Delphine had just been run over by a taxi.

— Père Goriot

In five or six minutes I felt slightly the end of her second finger——and presently it was laid flat with the other, and she continued rubbing in that way round and round for a good while; it then came into my head, that I should fall in love—I blush’d when I saw how white a hand she had—I shall never, an’ please your honour, behold another hand so white whilst I live——

The fair Beguine, said the corporal, continued rubbing with her whole hand under my knee—till I fear’d her zeal would weary her——“I would do a thousand times more,” said she, “for the love of Christ”——In saying which she pass’d her hand across the flannel, to the part above my knee, which I had equally complained of, and rubb’d it also.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Harsh and untuneful are the notes of love,

Unless my Julia strikes the key,

Her hand alone can touch the part,

Whose dulcet move-

ment charms the heart,

And governs all the man with sympathetic sway.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Saw in the review of a book recently: ‘One of those unfortunate affairs—women, even the nicest of them, tend to fall in love with men quite unworthy of them.’

— The Golden Notebook

When she saw she wasn’t getting anywhere with threats, she came back at him in a different way, with love talk, while we were all waiting.

— Journey to the End of the Night

(For she was thinking about love.)

— To the Lighthouse

The idea met with a budding love in his heart but had no troubling destroying it.

— The Red and the Black

Once, in the infinity of existence unmeasurable by time or space, a spiritual creature, upon its appearance on earth, is given the power to say: “I am and I love.”

— The Brothers Karamazov

Sitting quietly in the drawing-room with the five children, his hat and stick beside him on the Telefunken radiogram, the life-size images of the young Azizes staring at him from the walls, Major Zulfikar fell in love.

— Midnight's Children

Besides, said the corporal, resuming the discourse—but in a gayer accent——if it had not been for that single shot, I had never, an’ please your honour, been in love———

So, thou wast once in love, Trim! said my uncle Toby, smiling——

Souse! replied the corporal—over head and ears! an’ please your honour.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

They mistook it for love, nothing but love, the poor little things had never been taught anything else.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Is the love that one arouses because one is a sun-bronzed child of the South more personal than that aroused because one is a child of one of the largest industrialists?

— The Man Without Qualities

Of course I was worried about Father, who was so far gone in love that he looked like wrecking the whole family.

— The Man Without Qualities

You see, I love mankind so much that, believe it or not, there are moments when I would like to give up everything, abandon Lise, and become a hospital nurse.

— The Brothers Karamazov

I believed he’d love me, unclean as I am, love me truly, not just like an animal…

— The Brothers Karamazov

He made what apology he could and hurried home, glad that the satisfaction of his curiosity had preserved their love intact, and that, having feigned for so long a sort of indifference towards Odette, he had not now, by his jealousy, given her the proof that he loved her too much, which, between a pair of lovers, for ever dispenses the recipient from the obligation to love enough.

— In Search of Lost Time

In good time, nevertheless, as the ardor of youth declines; as years and dumps increase; as reflection lends her solemn pauses; in short, as a general lassitude overtakes the sated Turk; then a love of ease and virtue supplants the love for maidens; our Ottoman enters upon the impotent, repentant, admonitory stage of life, forswears, disbands the harem, and grown to an exemplary, sulky old soul, goes about all alone among the meridians and parallels saying his prayers, and warning each young Leviathan from his amorous errors.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

And recognising a person whom he does not love for him means drawing that other into the sphere of his love, where the other is then like a blank wall on which the sunlight lies.

— The Man Without Qualities

Despite the sharpest contrast in habits and views, and the fact that Lvov was older than Levin, they had become very close that winter and grown to love each other.

— Anna Karenina

I love him!

— A Sentimental Education

Yes, there should, there must, be love and faith: these left with us by fathers, husbands, sweethearts, brothers, who carried the pride and the hope of peace in honor’s vanguard as they did the flags; there must be these, else what do men fight for? what else worth dying for?

— Absalom, Absalom!

I could never love any one who was not a perfect gentleman.

— Middlemarch
money

And you should have seen the money the village women got out of him!

— The Brothers Karamazov

He should have been looking for his money right where he knows how to win or lose whole mountains of gold.

— Père Goriot

I’ve been strong enough to bear anything and everything, but this final lack of money has broken my heart.

— Père Goriot

Now, that handsome sum of money, Pip, is your own.

— Great Expectations

When Mr. Wemmick had put all the biscuit into the post, and had paid me my money from a cash-box in a safe, the key of which safe he kept somewhere down his back, and produced from his coat-collar like an iron pigtail, we went up-stairs.

— Great Expectations

“Ah, there’s better folks spent their money worse,” said a firm-voiced dyer, whose crimson hands looked out of keeping with his good-natured face.

— Middlemarch

Did he send you there to get money from her, to ask her to give him some money?

— The Brothers Karamazov

Her need for money was fantastic.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

I must say, I was rather surprised when the highly talented prosecutor, having brought up that envelope, suddenly and of his own accord—I repeat, of his own accord—declared, in the very passage of his speech in which he dismissed as preposterous the suggestion that Smerdyakov could be the murderer, that, if that envelope had not been left lying on the floor as a clue, if the thief had taken it with him, no one in the whole world would have known that there had been an envelope with money in it and that the money had been stolen by the accused.

— The Brothers Karamazov

That fellow who, last summer, went to town to collect the wages for the whole office and later claimed that he had got drunk and lost the money—remember him, sir?

— The Brothers Karamazov

In Mr. Brooke the hereditary strain of Puritan energy was clearly in abeyance; but in his niece Dorothea it glowed alike through faults and virtues, turning sometimes into impatience of her uncle’s talk or his way of “letting things be” on his estate, and making her long all the more for the time when she would be of age and have some command of money for generous schemes.

— Middlemarch

If I say it, then I have to be ready for it, that is, to have money and resign from the service.

— Anna Karenina

I’ve got enough money of my own, that’s no problem.

— The Golden Notebook

Not even the Saints will give us money, and Mr. Brougham would laugh at us.

— The Red and the Black

But that is precisely what nobody can assert of history, unless he happens to have written it down at the time, as the newspapers do, or unless it is a matter of professional or pecuniary affairs, for it is naturally important to know in how many years one will be entitled to a pension or when one will possess a certain sum of money or have spent it; and in such a context even wars can become memorable affairs.

— The Man Without Qualities

Everybody was complaining about not earning enough money when in came a man of medium height wearing a coat fastened by a single button; he had bright eyes and a rather wild look.

— A Sentimental Education

All the food was eaten, everybody was hungry and there was very little money to get home with.

— Sons and Lovers

Father, I would not wish you to judge me ill because I am in the house of these money-lenders.

— The Decameron

If some poor man could not pay his protection money, a chief would take his revenge on the whole quarter, and if the victim complained to the Chief or to the Trustee, it would just mean that they beat him too.

— Children of Gebelawi

Then that money, her money, had been to prevent the departure of that other woman, in order to hang on to his mistress!

— A Sentimental Education

Not having the money to pay, Frédéric borrowed five hundred francs from Deslauriers; a fortnight later he repeated the request and the lawyer’s clerk remonstrated with him for spending so much at Arnoux’s gallery.

— A Sentimental Education

“I’ll beg money from his sons-in-law and his daughters.”

— Père Goriot

He was roused from his reverie by the voice of fat Sylvie, calling that his tailor had arrived; Eugène came in, the packages of money still in his hands, and wasn’t a bit sorry to have the man see him thus endowed.

— Père Goriot

And doubtless what hurt him most in the whole business with Sutpen was not the loss of the money but the fact that he had had to sacrifice the hoarding, the symbol of the fortitude and abnegation, to keep intact the spiritual solvency which he believed that he had already established and secured.

— Absalom, Absalom!

“Bianchon, where’s the money from the watch?”

— Père Goriot

It would not be the mistress or even the child, not even the negro mistress and even less the child because of that fact, since Henry and Judith had grown up with a negro half sister of their own; not the mistress to Henry, certainly not the nigger mistress to a youth with Henry’s background, a young man grown up and living in a milieu where the other sex is separated into three sharp divisions, separated (two of them) by a chasm which could be crossed but one time and in but one direction—ladies, women, females—the virgins whom gentlemen someday married, the courtesans to whom they went while on sabbaticals to the cities, the slave girls and women upon whom that first caste rested and to whom in certain cases it doubtless owed the very fact of its virginity;—not this to Henry, young, strong-blooded, victim of the hard celibacy of riding and hunting to heat and make importunate the blood of a young man, to which he and his kind were forced to pass time away, with girls of his own class interdict and inaccessible and women of the second class just as inaccessible because of money and distance, and hence only the slave girls, the housemaids neated and cleaned by white mistresses or perhaps girls with sweating bodies out of the fields themselves and the young man rides up and beckons the watching overseer and says Send me Juno or Missylena or Chlory and then rides on into the trees and dismounts and waits.

— Absalom, Absalom!

He certainly would have, because he knew the money was there, since it was put there in his presence.

— The Brothers Karamazov

When a man as is father of a family has been an’ spent money at market and made himself the worse for liquor, he’s done enough mischief for one day.

— Middlemarch

Kerim embraced him and said:

‘And tomorrow, when the strong see the happiness of the weak they’ll realize that their power and their stolen money are nothing.’

— Children of Gebelawi

The children, and the perpetual preoccupation with clothing or money matters, must again have taken first place once I was gone, though their importance was never mentioned in my presence; even the scorned husband would become essential, and perhaps an object for love.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

Stolen money, which used to belong to God knows who, no longer belongs to anybody.

— Père Goriot

It must be said though that the ladies were not money-mad and the fault lies with the word “millionaire.”

— Dead Souls

Tell him the minute I have any money, I’ll pay him.

— Pedro Páramo
death

Ho, ho! from all your furthest bounds, pour ye now in, ye bold billows of my whole foregone life, and top this one piled comber of my death!

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Naturally he too was scared to death.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Waiting for Death.

— Middlemarch

Kadri instinctively knew death.

— Children of Gebelawi

When you came to think of it, taking it bit by bit, it was a pretty muddled and dreary thing, after all, but still, there it was, his own track ran right across it, and looking back you could see it quite clearly, from birth on to death.

— The Man Without Qualities

Death had come between us and so had life …

— Journey to the End of the Night

You know all about life and death.

— Middlemarch

Hassan leapt towards Lehita and exchanged a blow with him, then threw himself on him for a fight to the death.

— Children of Gebelawi

And this death, which here, in his beloved brother, moaning in his sleep and calling by habit, without distinction, now on God, now on the devil, was not at all as far off as it had seemed to him before.

— Anna Karenina

However, if we are to believe a Church Father, Death is not an evil, unless that which follows it is.

— Essays

Such an obsession may seem surprising in one who was already deep in meditation upon death, but I do not pretend to be more consistent than others.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

This could be compared with what was seen lately of one of our princes, who, hearing at Trent the news of the death of his older brother—a brother in whom lay the support and honor of his whole house—and soon afterward that of a younger brother, his second hope, withstood these two assaults with exemplary steadfastness; but when a few days afterward one of his men came to die, he let himself go at this last accident and, abandoning his resoluteness, gave himself up to sorrow and mourning, so that some argued that he had been touched to the quick only by this last shock.

— Essays

In this way Moosbrugger had got to his death-sentence and owed it only to Count Leinsdorf’s influence and friendly feelings towards Ulrich that there was a prospect of his mental condition being examined once again.

— The Man Without Qualities

‘I have not heard the particulars of my sister’s death, Biddy.’

— Great Expectations

The hour of our death is in the hand of God!

— Children of Gebelawi

And he briefly repeated to himself the whole train of his thought during those last two years, the beginning of which was the clear, obvious thought of death at the sight of his beloved, hopelessly ill brother.

— Anna Karenina

Frédéric felt a jolt and with a death-rattle, a man collapsed against his shoulder with a bullet lodged in the base of his spine.

— A Sentimental Education

In Nuremberg, with twelve death sentences, the trial of the Nazi leaders ends.

— History

The drunken man who blurts out an absurd command, the sleeping man who suddenly awakes and turns and chokes to death the woman sleeping at his side—are they not, perhaps, implementing one of the Company’s secret decisions?

— Ficciones

And so many people who, unable to endure the pangs of fear, have hanged themselves, drowned themselves, or leaped to their death, have taught us well that fear is even more unwelcome and unbearable than death itself.

— Essays

May God be my witness,” Ivan shouted, raising his hand, “that, although I may have secretly wished my father’s death, I am nowhere near as guilty as you imagine and perhaps I didn’t really mean to maneuver you into doing it.

— The Brothers Karamazov

We must devise symbols for the secrets of our work and write them in a book so that our efforts aren’t wasted and so that my death will not mean the end of these experiments.

— Children of Gebelawi

But not to let his death go unavenged,

Lycormas snatched in fury from the door

The right crossbar and crashed it down upon

Pettalus’ neck, and he dropped like an ox

Slaughtered in sacrifice.

— Metamorphoses

You’d be but a fierce young hound indeed, if at your time of life you could help to hunt a wretched warmint, hunted as near death and dunghill as this poor wretched warmint is!

— Great Expectations

He had expected to find the physical signs of approaching death more definite — greater weakness, greater emaciation — but still almost the same condition.

— Anna Karenina

It was from this modest post that I witnessed the last thrusts in a duel to the death between Domitian and Rome.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

A great joy to live within these walls, they ran me into the ground, I thought I’d committed murder but it was only manslaughter, GBH resulting in death, not so bad, I’d gotten to be a right s.o.b., a ruffian, little better than a vagrant.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

Of those nine, four might initiate a third drawing to determine the name of the executioner, two might replace the unlucky draw with a lucky one (the discovery of a treasure, say), another might decide that the death should be exacerbated (death with dishonor, that is, or with the refinement of torture), others might simply refuse to carry out the sentence….That is the scheme of the Lottery, put symbolically.

— Ficciones

The death of Shaaban, God rest his soul, has grieved us all.

— Children of Gebelawi

I have come to speak of myself, at times, in the past tense: in the Senate, while discussing certain events which had taken place after the death of Lucius, I have caught myself more than once mentioning those circumstances, by a slip of the tongue, as if they had occurred after my own death.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

Old age means not having a passionate role to play anymore, seeing your theater fold up on you, so there’s nothing but death to look forward to!

— Journey to the End of the Night

He was close to death once, now he’s picked himself up!

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

First, he drove to the town hall to notify the death; next, having obtained the official certificate from the doctor concerned, he went back to the town hall to tell them which cemetery the family wanted and to make arrangements with the undertakers.

— A Sentimental Education