love
money
death
love

“I know you are now in love with another woman, and I myself am in love with another man, but nevertheless I’ll always love you and you’ll always love me.

— The Brothers Karamazov

‘I’m in love with this all’, waving her hand at the hedge, at the house, at the children?

— To the Lighthouse

And this question always called up another question in him — whether they feel differently, love differently, marry differently, these other people, these Vronskys and Oblonskys … these gentlemen of the bed-chamber with their fat calves.

— Anna Karenina

When she thought of Vronsky, she imagined that he did not love her, that he was already beginning to be burdened by her, that she could not offer herself to him, and she felt hostile to him because of it.

— Anna Karenina

Ah, majesty and love go ill together,

Nor long share one abode!

— Metamorphoses

And, with her love, I cannot envy Serpukhovskoy.

— Anna Karenina

And in this she was aided by the resentment she now felt in place of her former love for Diotima; for since she was no longer content to have a share in her mistress’s sublime raptures, but was carrying on her own amorous affair, she had changed a great deal.

— The Man Without Qualities

They’ve got no idea what happiness is, they don’t know that without this love there is no happiness or unhappiness for us — there is no life,’ he thought.

— Anna Karenina

The letter was dated September 18, 1952 (this was September 22), and the address she gave was ‘General Delivery, Coalmont’ (not ‘Va.’ not ‘Pa.’ not ‘Tenn.’ — and not Coalmont, anyway — I have camouflaged everything, my love).

— Lolita

“What am I supposed to be doing,” he said, looking at her laughing; “cleaning shoes or dibbling with love?

— Sons and Lovers

You’re just a little boy, Alyosha, so here’s a piece of advice for you: never ask the woman you love for forgiveness!

— The Brothers Karamazov

You can’t love me … If … it’s better to say it.

— Anna Karenina

He talks about love and economics, about chemistry and canoeing trips, he is a learned man, a landowner and a stock-jobber.

— The Man Without Qualities

And he wanted no more of those nights when dust, wine, boredom, the expanses of fields that had been galloped over, and the tyranny of the horse, that everlasting subject of conversation, drove the comrades-in-arms, married and unmarried alike, into that revelry behind heavily curtained windows where wenches were stood on their heads to have champagne poured into their petticoats—girls that they had had hauled along, trembling with awe, fear, and curiosity, by the universal Jew of those god-forsaken little Galican garrison-townships, who was like some cock-eyed, poky little general store where one could get everything from love to saddle-soap on credit, at interest.

— The Man Without Qualities

‘You envy him for being unable to fall in love?’

— Anna Karenina

I had fallen so low that, if I had had to choose between falling in love with a woman and reading a book about love, I should have chosen the book.

— Zorba the Greek

He stayed but two days, yet now if ever was his chance to come to an understanding with Judith, perhaps even to fall in love with her.

— Absalom, Absalom!

Nor did anyone know about his love for the victim, for he had always been a taciturn and uncommunicative man and had never had a close friend to whom he might have confided his passion.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Worse, I lost faith, for a few minutes, in the judgement of the female creature who responds, or does not, according to whether Saul is making love out of conviction or not.

— The Golden Notebook

While he was speaking there came a vivid flash of lightening which lit each of them up for the other—and the light seemed to be the terror of a hopeless love.

— Middlemarch

If you still love me, say nothing; nothing you can say will cure our little Stanislas’ fever.

— The Red and the Black

Dare I mention that upon returning to his room, Julien threw himself down on his knees and covered the love letters Prince Korasoff had given him with kisses?

— The Red and the Black

He hummed old love songs.

— Zorba the Greek

Women don’t love men for their goodness.

— Middlemarch

Love for a father that the father has not deserved is inconceivable and absurd.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And while Mme Verdurin was saying to her husband, “Run and fetch him a glass of orangeade; he’s earned it,” Swann began to tell Odette how he had fallen in love with that little phrase.

— In Search of Lost Time

I’d love to know.

— The Golden Notebook

Goriot’s totally irrational devotion to his daughters, his touchy, ticklish love for them, was so well known that, once, one of his rivals, wanting to make him leave the market so the other man could have the field all to himself, told him that Delphine had just been run over by a taxi.

— Père Goriot

Now, the thing is that the Catholic Church (and Arnheim had a great love for it) mostly depicts its saints and the standard-bearers of the Good in very blissful, even ecstatic poses.

— The Man Without Qualities

He was overcome with feelings of wonder and love for the place, and knew that he was enjoying the most precious moments of his life.

— Children of Gebelawi

Before I could answer (if I could have answered so difficult a question at all), she repeated, ‘Love her, love her, love her!

— Great Expectations

Yet on the day when I went out there to stay that summer, it was as though that casual pause at my door had left some seed, some minute virulence in this cellar earth of mine quick not for love perhaps (I did not love him; how could I? I had never even heard his voice, had only Ellen’s word for it that there was such a person) and quick not for the spying which you will doubtless call it, which during the past six months between that New Year’s and that June gave substance to that shadow with a name emerging from Ellen’s vain and garrulous folly, that shape without even a face yet because I had not even seen the photograph then, reflected in the secret and bemused gaze of a young girl: because I who had learned nothing of love, not even parents’ love—that fond dear constant violation of privacy, that stultification of the burgeoning and incorrigible  I  which is the meed and due of all mammalian meat, became not mistress, not beloved, but more than even love; I became all polymath love’s androgynous advocate.

— Absalom, Absalom!

For now he sees clearly and says to himself: “I now have the knowledge and I am yearning for love; but now that my earthly life is over, there can be no self-abnegation, no sacrifice in love, and Abraham will not come to me again and bring me even a tiny drop of living water (that is, the gift of life on earth, the active life I possessed before); since I will never again be given life and time, I will never be able to quench the fiery thirst for love that burns in me, because I scorned love while I was on earth.

— The Brothers Karamazov
money

He gives Kinu money, and so I suppose you can think of it as his money, but it wasn’t the right thing to do.

— The Sound of the Mountain

They’d leave home in the morning, and it took them all day, because of all the figures they added up and the discussions they’d have about the prices of things and the money they might have saved by buying one thing rather than another …

— Journey to the End of the Night

Mr. Dmitry happens to need money very badly just now, very, very badly.

— The Brothers Karamazov

I don’t like it, but I know it’s uncommonly hard on my father to say so, after he has spent a good deal of money in educating me for it.

— Middlemarch

‘Not a cent,’ she said sadly, lifting her eyebrows, showing me the empty inside of her money purse.

— Lolita

Each of the Morel children, William, then Annie, then Paul, had fetched the money on Friday afternoons, until they went themselves to work.

— Sons and Lovers

And Deslauriers began by praising him, before gently proceeding to run him down; he was forgetful, self-centered and mean with his money.

— A Sentimental Education

When he decided to reject the money, his voice was so terribly weak, so faltering; the words came out so quickly and he was sort of chuckling all the time, or was he weeping even then?

— The Brothers Karamazov

Mr. Perkhotin informed us that when you came to see him you were holding a bundle of money in your hands … your bloodstained hands … a lot of money, bills of high denomination—a wad of hundred-ruble bills.

— The Brothers Karamazov

The prosecutor seemed to be very satisfied with his own piece of fiction about the accused being a weak-willed man who so shamefully accepted the three thousand rubles offered him, under such humiliating circumstances, by his fiancée, a man too spineless to keep the money sewn in that little bag of his, a man who, even if he had sewn the money up in that bag originally, would have been unsewing it every second day to fish out one hundred-ruble bill after another, until after a month or so, he had gone through the whole sum.

— The Brothers Karamazov

I didn’t understand her at all then: I thought she wouldn’t come with me unless I had some money, that she would never accept me penniless.

— The Brothers Karamazov

If money’s to be the measurer, man, and the accountants have computed their great counting-house the globe, by girdling it with guineas, one to every three parts of an inch; then, let me tell thee, that my vengeance will fetch a great premium here!

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Suddenly he conceived a new “plan”—one he felt sure “cannot fail to get me that damned money.”

— The Brothers Karamazov

And so, since you are not otherwise engaged at present, if you will attend to this matter I propose to obtain favours for you at court, and allow you a reasonable portion of the money you recover.

— The Decameron

I made a secret of it; and I, who dare say so much about myself, spoke of my money only to lie, as do the others who, rich, make out to be poor, or poor, make out to be rich, and dispense their conscience from ever testifying sincerely to what they have: a ridiculous and shameful prudence.

— Essays

However, Casaubon has money enough; I must do him that justice.

— Middlemarch

Then he sent for the Englishman and for the moneylender, and divided the money he had available into payments.

— Anna Karenina

No, his money’s there too.

— Dead Souls

The next day, his imagination taking another tack, it seemed to him that Julien was about to understand the mute language of his generosity with money, would change his name, exile himself to America, write Mathilde that he was dead to her.

— The Red and the Black

This would begin when both men and women had come back with a little money and some plain food after a grueling day’s work.

— Children of Gebelawi

Whereupon the two brothers made all necessary arrangements, using his own money to see that he had an honourable funeral, and sending news of his death to the friars and asking them to come that evening to observe the customary vigil, and the following morning to take away the body.

— The Decameron

So that the children could fetch the money, school closed early on Friday afternoons.

— Sons and Lovers

Yet she could see him, clearly, putting money on a mantlepiece.

— The Golden Notebook

And then there was Kinu, letting him have the money.

— The Sound of the Mountain

But for nearly fifteen years I had paid his debts, hushed up his scandals, and answered his letters without delay; delightful letters they were, but they always ended with requests for money for himself, or for advancement for his friends.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

Put that money back in your pocket, for heaven’s sake, Mitya!

— The Brothers Karamazov

They talk about belief in God, in the Fatherland, in freedom, in the people, in the revolution; and all these beliefs are just frauds, tricks for their convenience, like medals and money.

— History

But then we took her money and spent it, so she couldn’t go back to Petersburg.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Spose people left money laying around where he was—what did he do?

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

And if he promised to double or treble her usual price and put the money on the table at the start, so that she did not need to think about it any more and could abandon herself to the carefree obliging state of mind that is brought about by having concluded a good piece of business, it would become apparent that pure indifference has the same merit as all pure feelings, which is that of being free of personal presumption and of functioning without the vain confusion caused by emotional demands.

— The Man Without Qualities

But I would have taken the money.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Had he money enough to buy tobacco?

— To the Lighthouse

And to think that you can go out among all that money, and nobody’ll give you a single penny, not even to go and eat with!

— Journey to the End of the Night
death

The yet levelled musket shook like a drunkard’s arm against the panel; Starbuck seemed wrestling with an angel; but turning from the door, he placed the death-tube in its rack, and left the place.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Suppose we could raise the life of the people to our level, would death stop hunting us?

— Children of Gebelawi

When the letter was brought into the parlour, which contained the news of my brother’s death, my father had got forwards again upon his journey to within a stride of the compasses of the very same stage of Nevers.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

After my death, I had you remarried to M. de Croisenois, who would have married a widow.

— The Red and the Black

Death was certain, yet it would have been bad form to defend oneself and kill a Jacobin or two.

— The Red and the Black

After their father’s death, they all desired to succeed to his title and estate, and each man denied the claims of the others, producing his ring to prove his case.

— The Decameron

Oh, lonely death on lonely life!

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

In his heart there was no longer the least fear of starving to death.

— The Red and the Black

She went up to Alexei Alexandrovich and with the familiarity that comes from the nearness of death took him by the arm and led him to the bedroom.

— Anna Karenina

She remembered that he was the only person in this world who had been good to her; and his reward was to be death.

— Children of Gebelawi

And death presented itself to her clearly and vividly as the only way to restore the love for her in his heart, to punish him and to be victorious in the struggle that the evil spirit lodged in her heart was waging with him.

— Anna Karenina

But the truth was that in the depths of his morbid condition he feared death itself no more than such a recovery, which would in fact amount to the death of all that he was now.

— In Search of Lost Time

I have come to the realization that few men fulfill themselves before death, and I have judged their interrupted work with the more pity.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

The people I knew were all poor, people whose death is of no interest to anybody.

— Journey to the End of the Night

The whore of Babylon has lost, Death has won, and drums her away.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

And on the days on which she happened to be once more kind and affectionate towards him, had shown him some thoughtful attention, he recorded these deceptive signs of a chance of feeling on her part with the fond and skeptical solicitude, the desperate joy of people who, nursing a friend in the last days of an incurable illness, relate as facts of infinitely precious insignificance: “Yesterday he went through his accounts himself, and actually corrected a mistake we had made in adding them up; he ate and egg today and seemed quite to enjoy it, and if he digests it properly we shall try him with a cutlet tomorrow”—although they themselves know that these things are meaningless on the eve of an inevitable death.

— In Search of Lost Time

All had been part of the field of death.

— To the Lighthouse

These words and the concepts connected with them were very well suited to intellectual purposes, but they gave nothing for life, and Levin suddenly felt himself in the position of a person who has traded his warm fur coat for muslin clothing and, caught in the cold for the first time, is convinced beyond question, not by reasoning but with his whole being, that he is as good as naked and must inevitably die a painful death.

— Anna Karenina

Have no doubts about it, the horrible thought that an innocent man had been led to his death because of me would poison the rest of my life and no doubt shorten it.

— The Red and the Black

He thinks Death, the merciful and conclusive, is now approaching.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

He seemed to enjoy provoking everyone: the submitting Italians, the occupying Germans, the Fascist renegades, the Flying Fortresses of the Allies, the posters with their requisitions and their death penalties.

— History

She nodded, and I broke in across the game and said: ‘No, not of my death.

— The Golden Notebook

I never had one hour’s happiness in her society, and yet my mind all round the four-and-twenty hours was harping on the happiness of having her with me unto death.

— Great Expectations

And he thinks of his little Mitzi, and something comes up in him, a kind of fear, terror beckons to him, there it is, there is a reaper, Death yclept, he comes with axes and rods, he blows a flute, then he cracks open his jaws and he takes a trombone, will he play the trombone, will he hit the cymbals, will the terrible black storm goat come, boom, always gently, boom-vroom.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

What he needed after Zosima’s death was not miracles but “higher justice,” and he felt it had been violated.

— The Brothers Karamazov

They have pointed out that the orderly Phoedimus, who hated me, and whose silence could not have been bought by my friends, very opportunely died of a malignant fever the day after the death of his master.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

Franz wrestles and waits for Death, for merciful Death.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

‘And at last we shoved her off,’ he went on (but in their anger and their silence they only caught a word here and there, sitting at opposite ends of the boat, united by their compact to fight tyranny to the death).

— To the Lighthouse

But I must remind you that, here too, you are faced with a matter of life and death for a man!

— The Brothers Karamazov

In what census of living creatures, the dead of mankind are included; why it is that a universal proverb says of them, that they tell no tales, though containing more secrets than the Goodwin Sands; how it is that to his name who yesterday departed for the other world, we prefix so significant and infidel a word, and yet do not thus entitle him, if he but embarks for the remotest Indies of this living earth; why the Life Insurance Companies pay death-forfeitures upon immortals; in what eternal, unstirring paralysis, and deadly, hopeless trance, yet lies antique Adam who died sixty round centuries ago; how it is that we still refuse to be comforted for those who we nevertheless maintain are dwelling in unspeakable bliss; why all the living so strive to hush all the dead; wherefore but the rumor of a knocking in a tomb will terrify a whole city.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Before daybreak, it was said later, the news of the death had reached town.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Death, in its aspect of weakness or decay, came to the surface everywhere: the bad spot on a fruit, some imperceptible rent at the edge of a hanging, a carrion body on the shore, the pustules of a face, the mark of scourges on a bargeman’s back.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

A great joy to live within these walls, they ran me into the ground, I thought I’d committed murder but it was only manslaughter, GBH resulting in death, not so bad, I’d gotten to be a right s.o.b., a ruffian, little better than a vagrant.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz