love
money
death
love

‘You see,’ said Paul, with his small rake’s grimace, ‘we’re like an old married couple already—we know we’re going to make love in bed tonight, so now we just hold hands.’

— The Golden Notebook

A man, you know, may fall in love with physical beauty, with a woman’s body, maybe even with just a bit of that body.

— The Brothers Karamazov

He’s the only man she has ever loved, whom she still loves, and whom she will always love.

— The Brothers Karamazov

All of a sudden, his love seemed criminal.

— A Sentimental Education

And so, through the chemical action of his malady, after he had created jealousy out of his love, he began again to manufacture tenderness and pity for Odette.

— In Search of Lost Time

After a separation that she had thought eternal, he had been given back to her; she was seeing him again, and all he had done to find his way to her was proof of so much love!

— The Red and the Black

She judged of her own symptoms as those of awakening love, and she held it still more natural that Mr. Lydgate should have fallen in love at first sight of her.

— Middlemarch

Imaginary love yearns for an immediate heroic act that is achieved quickly and seen by everyone.

— The Brothers Karamazov

To mercy, pity, peace, and love

All pray in their distress,

And to these virtues of delight,

Return their thankfulness.

— Middlemarch

We talked only a little and exchanged no expressions of love or flirtation.

— Season of Migration to the North

Certainly, men’s passions are either excited or sustained by one or the other of these two causes, which between them entirely divide up love’s imperial realm.

— Père Goriot

How can a man trust a woman who falls in love with him only after they have made love?

— The Golden Notebook

And Women in Love.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

The paschal lamb and the Easter cakes were being transformed into love songs.

— Zorba the Greek

Only some time later did he discover that this man was a well-known and very able lawyer, highly respected in his profession, with a harmless love, into the bargain, of a day’s slaughter with the guns, a welcome figure at pub and club and in all places where sportsmen and legal men sat and talked about masculine affairs instead of art and love.

— The Man Without Qualities

“Oh, I love artistic people,” replied the lady in pink.

— In Search of Lost Time

All she had left was his love, and she wanted to love him.

— Anna Karenina

You love money, I know that.

— The Brothers Karamazov

George drank down a full tankard of beer without stopping, and said: ‘Anyway I’ve no right to care whether anyone’s in love with anyone.

— The Golden Notebook

That meant, he had arranged with Jane, from my home, to meet her to make love, gone over, made love, come back, got into my bed, slept.

— The Golden Notebook

Love God’s creation, love every atom of it separately, and love it also as a whole; love every green leaf, every ray of God’s light; love the animals and the plants and love every inanimate object.

— The Brothers Karamazov

‘I love mankind,’ he said, ‘but I find to my amazement that the more I love mankind as a whole, the less I love individual people.

— The Brothers Karamazov

‘Oh, people always love me!’

— A Sentimental Education

Good, admirable Molly, if ever she reads these lines in some place I never heard of, I want her to know that my feelings for her haven’t changed, that I still love her and always will in my own way, that she can come here any time she pleases and share my bread and furtive destiny.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Ambition was the old dream of his childhood and youth, a dream which he did not confess even to himself, but which was so strong that even now this passion struggled with his love.

— Anna Karenina

I feel I have the right now to love and to kiss my children.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Now, excess, in this exhibitionistic game of his, was inevitable; however, a kind of ingenuous question, timid and propitiatory, appeared every now and then, the following (more or less): “Well, do you love me? Yes or no? Ah, say yes: I enjoy so much being loved …”

— History

But the time has come, I’ve realized that I can no longer deceive myself, that I am alive, that I am not to blame if God has made me so that I must love and live.

— Anna Karenina

She felt the usual surge of protective love for Janet, but tonight she examined this emotion critically: I know no one who isn’t incomplete and tormented and fighting, the best one can say of anyone is that they fight—but I touch Janet and immediately I feel: Well, it will be different for her.

— The Golden Notebook

‘Well then,’ said Mrs Ramsey, ‘we will cover it up,’ and they all watched her go to the chest of drawers, and open the little drawers quickly one after another, and not seeing anything that would do, she quickly took her own shawl off and wound it round the skull, round and round and round, and then she came back to Cam and laid her head almost flat on the pillow beside Cam’s and said how lovely it looked now; how the fairies would love it; it was like a bird’s nest; it was like a beautiful mountain such as she had seen abroad, with valleys and flowers and bells ringing and birds singing and little goats and antelopes . . . She could see the words echoing as she spoke them rhythmically in Cam’s mind, and Cam was repeating after her how it was like a mountain, a bird’s nest, a garden, and there were little antelopes, and her eyes were opening and shutting, and Mrs Ramsey went on saying still more monotonously, and more rhythmically and more nonsensically, how she must shut her eyes and go to sleep and dream of mountains and valleys and stars falling and parrots and antelopes and gardens, and everything lovely, she said, raising her head very slowly and speaking more and more mechanically, until she sat upright and saw that Cam was asleep.

— To the Lighthouse

And his inner voice told him that he should not go, that there could be nothing here but falseness, that to rectify, to repair, their relations was impossible, because it was impossible to make her attractive and arousing of love again or to make him an old man incapable of love.

— Anna Karenina

In her thoughts, she was treating Julien somewhat as an inferior whose fortune one intends to make when and how one wishes, and about whose love one does not permit oneself to have the slightest doubt.

— The Red and the Black

“I could not love a man who is ridiculous,” said Mary, not choosing to go deeper.

— Middlemarch
money

Do you really imagine I’ll take money for souls which, in a sense, have terminated their existence?

— Dead Souls

Put away your money.

— The Brothers Karamazov

They pay money for the privilege.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

Here are thirty-six francs, your first month’s salary; but you must promise on your word not to give a sou of this money to your father.

— The Red and the Black

True, the muzhiks of this company, though they had agreed to conduct business on the new basis, referred to the land not as common but as shared, and both the muzhiks of the association and Rezunov himself more than once said to Levin: ‘If you’d take money for the land, it would put you at ease and unbind us.’

— Anna Karenina

I still don’t know why, but I said that until then I hadn’t realized that people thought badly of me for doing it, but that the home had seemed like the natural thing since I didn’t have enough money to have Maman cared for.

— The Stranger

You should have seen him tossing money to those gypsy girls!

— The Brothers Karamazov

Mademoiselle Michonneau was afraid to even look at the money, for fear of openly exhibiting her greed.

— Père Goriot

That the money came from Bulstrode would infallibly have been guessed even if there had been no direct evidence of it; for it had beforehand entered into the gossip about Lydgate’s affairs, that neither his father-in-law nor his own family would do anything for him, and direct evidence was furnished not only by a clerk at the Bank, but by innocent Mrs. Bulstrode herself, who mentioned the loan to Mrs. Plymdale, who mentioned it to her daughter-in-law of the house of Toller, who mentioned it generally.

— Middlemarch

‘I’ll sail with ye,’—he says,—‘the passage money, how much is that?—I’ll pay now.’

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

I must say here, in anticipation, that he may have known where he could get hold of the money he needed and perhaps he knew exactly where it was hidden.

— The Brothers Karamazov

But if one tries to get the general human element out of them—that which is common to them all—there are actually only three things that can be left over: stupidity, money, or, at the most, a trace of religious memory.

— The Man Without Qualities

And all the money they stole from him—they didn’t give him receipts for it, so we’d never know how much it was.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And as to where that money had come from, he had told her and her alone that he had “stolen” it from Katerina, to which she had answered that he had not stolen it since he would pay it back the next day.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Meanwhile he stood, weary with disgust: this money-grubbing woman, well what can one expect?

— The Golden Notebook

‘Left over from before, savings, money I put by.’

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

The merchant would not give more, especially since that winter Darya Alexandrovna, claiming a direct right to her own fortune for the first time, had refused to put her signature to the receipt of the money for the last third of the wood.

— Anna Karenina

He had meant to confide in Lydgate, and discuss the money question with him, and he had meant to amuse himself for the few evenings of his stay by having a great deal of music and badinage with fair Rosamond, without neglecting his friends at Lowick Parsonage:—if the Parsonage was close to the Manor, that was no fault of his.

— Middlemarch

Franz Biberkopf gets up, pays and says to himself: I’m too old to dance, and I don’t rightly feel like it either, I need to come into money, and I don’t much care where I get it from.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

“But… but how is it that you… that you know about the money?”

— The Brothers Karamazov

Trifonov went off to the annual fair, made various financial transactions, and always returned the money to the Colonel, along with presents from the fair and interest on the capital.

— The Brothers Karamazov

How would it be if he were to offer Hans money so that at long last he could finish his studies without any further obstacle?

— The Man Without Qualities

To start with, the implication is that, yesterday, Smerdyakov, seized by remorse, returned the money he had stolen and then hanged himself, because, of course, if he had not been remorseful he would not have returned the money.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And so, having decided to commit the crime, he goes and reveals all the details about the money to another person—the accused—who, he knows, is extremely interested in that money, and he initiates him into every secret: where the money is hidden, what is written on the envelope, how to knock on the door to be let in—the secret knocking code that would enable him to get inside the house, which is the most important.

— The Brothers Karamazov

I had no cigarettes, so I offered him money.

— Zorba the Greek

The money won’t hold us up.

— Anna Karenina

Well, where did they find the money in the end?

— The Brothers Karamazov

‘But you only hate them because of the money they take from the estate, not because of their wickedness,’ thought Arafa.

— Children of Gebelawi

But all the while there was a current of thought in her about his probable want of money, and the impossibility of her helping him.

— Middlemarch

And as long as he had money, he remained decent.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

I’ve told Sokolov to sell the wheat and take money in advance for the mill.

— Anna Karenina

Yes, I thought of it during that terrible month: I was about to go and see Katya, tell her about my betrayal and beg her for some money to take care of the expenses that betrayal would incur (yes, I said beg, do you hear me?), so that I could run away with her hated rival, a woman who had mortally offended her.

— The Brothers Karamazov

For to labor with dignity in the vineyards of the Lord, and not to be altogether unworthy of one’s erudite fellow laborers, one needed instruction; it was necessary to spend two very expensive years at the seminary in Besançon; it was thus indispensable, and one might even say one’s duty, to save money, which was much easier to do on a salary of eight hundred francs paid quarterly than with six hundred francs, which were eaten up from month to month.

— The Red and the Black
death

But Death plucked down some virtuous elder brother, on whose whistling daily toil solely hung the responsibilities of some other family, and left the worse than useless old man standing, till the hideous rot of life should make him easier to harvest.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

And you, Bakri, busy yourself in making money till death gives you release from it.

— Season of Migration to the North

The wings of mystic time beat down on us then, white with snowflakes, time that would whirl us all after our Rosies to death and the frame-house funeral.

— The Golden Notebook

Now I knew it for sure, he was worse than a dog, he couldn’t conceive of his own death.

— Journey to the End of the Night

For his part, meanwhile, the recent Founder of the Empire, taking this great step in his career, had actually put his foot in the trap that was to doom him to the final scandal, to his downfall and death.

— History

“How can they assert that ‘property is the death of the mind’?” he then began the quarrel with her.

— The Man Without Qualities

Now let us go back to my brother’s death.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Moreover, by the bed in his room he kept some flasks of wine, which made him nasty drunk: he would suddenly come out of the door, lumbering, as if on a deck in a storm, shouting insults and obscenities; or else yelling: Death! Death!! Death!!!

— History

And Swann felt a very cordial sympathy with the sultan Mahomet II whose portrait by Bellini he admired, who, on finding that he had fallen madly in love with one of his wives, stabbed her to death in order, as his Venetian biographer artlessly relates, to recover his peace of mind.

— In Search of Lost Time

Understanding clearly then for the first time that for every man and for himself nothing lay ahead but suffering, death and eternal oblivion, he decided that it was impossible to live that way, that he had either to explain his life so that it did not look like the wicked mockery of some devil, or shoot himself.

— Anna Karenina

Twenty of thirty young men were blown up in France, among them Andrew Ramsey, whose death, mercifully, was instantaneous.

— To the Lighthouse

In a state between life and death I saw formations of sand grouse heading northwards.

— Season of Migration to the North

——One must not give him his death, however,—interrupted my father.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

My friend, you will go far, but I don’t mean to cut short your career, which will be brilliant, by letting you starve to death.

— The Red and the Black

She kept them still: and she did not forgive his death.

— Sons and Lovers

I want only to tell the pure truth, and this truth is: Franz Biberkopf hears Death, he hears this Death, and he hears him singing slowly, like a stammerer, with many repetitions, and also in the manner of a saw, cutting into wood.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

She accepted the accident of my death, and not content to acquiesce, she wondered if I was as resigned to it as she was.

— Journey to the End of the Night

He did not consider himself wise, but he could not help knowing that he was more intelligent than his wife or Agafya Mikhailovna, and he could not help knowing that when he thought about death, he thought about it with all the forces of his soul.

— Anna Karenina

It was extremely impersonal; it said something about death; it said very little about love.

— To the Lighthouse

But after one has experienced and understood many things, to cling on, not to go down into death, not to slip away, but to stretch, to feel, to present oneself with one’s soul and stand there, that amounts to something.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

Tell me, when this same Pequod here had her three masts overboard in that typhoon on Japan, that same voyage when thou went mate with Captain Ahab, did’st thou not think of Death and the Judgment then?

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

But in the last scene, between death and ourselves, there is no more pretending; we must talk plain French, we must show what there is that is good and clean at the bottom of the pot:

At last true words surge up from deep within our breast,

The mask is snatched away, reality is left.

— Essays

No, whatever you say, her death was itself the death of a vile, irreligious woman.

— Anna Karenina

But I only spent my nights awake in the back room and risked death twice for the good of the alley.

— Children of Gebelawi

Whereas I’m already dead, it doesn’t do to take life too seriously, or death either.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

For fear of death he had put himself under the Trustee’s protection and lost everything; and yet death had come—death, which destroyed life with fear even before it struck.

— Children of Gebelawi

I am ready to narrow my own resources and the prospects of my family by binding myself to allow you five hundred pounds yearly during my life, and to leave you a proportional capital at my death—nay, to do still more, if more should be definitely necessary to any laudable project on your part.

— Middlemarch

But the Hills and the Caves were as silent as death.

— Things Fall Apart

M. de Rouvrary was to become duke upon the death of a very old uncle.

— The Red and the Black

Why, is there anyone who doesn’t wish his father’s death?

— The Brothers Karamazov

Two choruses, and you felt a kind of longing for the sweet land of death, the land of everlasting tenderness and immediate foggy forgetfulness.

— Journey to the End of the Night

“Death and despair all around,” Mitya kept muttering in rhythm with his steps, as he walked on and on.

— The Brothers Karamazov

If I stay, you will believe me to be the cause of your son’s death, and you will die of grief.

— The Red and the Black