love
money
death
love

He was pleased by this, as he was pleased by anything that might impress Odette with his love for her, or merely his influence, with the extent to which he could be of use to her.

— In Search of Lost Time

I love you very much!

— Anna Karenina

“Ah!” she answered, “like mother said to me when I was little: ‘Love begets love’.”

— Sons and Lovers

I love Marie for ever and ever.

— The Golden Notebook

Do you still love me then.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

And as the conversation resumed, Frédéric, as always, brought it round to his love for her.

— A Sentimental Education

His love of talk had grown with age and sickness.

— Things Fall Apart

Ivan doesn’t love anyone, though; Ivan is not like us.

— The Brothers Karamazov

“Let me kiss your feet, my love!” said Bouboulina, making ready to drop to the ground.

— Zorba the Greek

“I love your sweat,” she would say as though intoning rites in a temple.

— Season of Migration to the North

Swann was still unconscious of the disgrace that threatened him at the Verdurins’, and continued to regard all their absurdities in the most rosy light, through the admiring eyes of love.

— In Search of Lost Time

There was a gloomy girl Marion, and there was her stepmother who turned out to be, against all expectations, a young, gray, understanding redhead who explained to Marion that Marion’s dead mother had really been a heroic woman since she had deliberately dissimulated her great love for Marion because she was dying, and did not want her child to miss her.

— Lolita

Towards morning, the young married couple in the next room made love.

— The Golden Notebook

“She said she was going to a concert, my love,” replied Annie.

— Sons and Lovers

So, with no time to lose, he wouldn’t be coming home this summer; and could he please have an extra two hundred and fifty francs for private coaching (extremely helpful); all this embroidered with expressions of regret, commiseration, filial love and general claptrap.

— A Sentimental Education

Then she could love him.

— Sons and Lovers

Men slaughter each other or fraternise with each other, never rightly knowing whether they are doing it quite seriously, because, after all, one part of oneself is outside oneself and all that happens seems to go on half in front of reality, or half behind it, as a sort of sword-play in a mirror, a sham fight of hate and love.

— The Man Without Qualities

‘ “Who hast brought into unity those who were sundered, and hast ordained for them an indissoluble bond of love” — how profound these words are, and how well they correspond to what one feels at this moment!’ thought Levin.

— Anna Karenina

And she torments me, torments me all the time with love.

— The Brothers Karamazov

The moment of naturalness was the crystallising feather-touch; it shook flirtation into love.

— Middlemarch

And Swann, in his heart of hearts, turned to it as to a confidant of his love, as to a friend of Odette who would surely tell her to pay no attention to this Forcheville.

— In Search of Lost Time

Now as widow Wadman did love my uncle Toby——and my uncle Toby did not love widow Wadman, there was nothing for Wadman to do, but to go on and love my uncle Toby——or let it alone.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

It takes hard work and a long apprenticeship, for it is not just for a moment that we must learn to love, but forever.

— The Brothers Karamazov

But this practice, in which your youthful love of austerity finds charm, calls for attentions more complicated than those of culinary refinement itself; and it separates us too much from the common run of men in a function which is nearly always public, and in which either friendship or formality presides.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

Nothing could hinder it but her love of extremes, and her insistance on regulating life according to notions which might cause a wary man to hesitate before he made her an offer, or even might lead her at last to refuse all offers.

— Middlemarch

I heard her saying to me in an imploring voice of surrender “I love you,” and there answered her voice a weak cry from the depths of my consciousness calling on me to desist.

— Season of Migration to the North

To the first child, though of a man she did not love, had gone all the force of a love that had not been satisfied; the girl, born in the most difficult conditions, did not receive a hundredth part of the care that had gone to the first child.

— Anna Karenina

We have children because we love a man.

— The Golden Notebook

I love this English girl, I myself don’t know why.

— Anna Karenina

But he went on: ‘Believe me, I wanted nothing more than to have the real thing with you—’ and then, switching into the painful bitterness—‘If the love they say is possible is more real than what we seem to get.’

— The Golden Notebook

How can you love me!” she kept repeating to him artlessly, because the idea depressed her.

— The Red and the Black

‘Do you think Wad Rayyes has fallen in love with Hosna Bint Mahmoud?’ I said to Mahjoub, who had cheered me up.

— Season of Migration to the North

He was known as the man who delivered people from evil spirits and gave health and happiness, just for the love of God.

— Children of Gebelawi
money

This was something to which Tuzzi accorded full recognition, so long as it brought in enough money or the person concerned came under the heading, which did after all somehow exist, of ‘poet.’

— The Man Without Qualities

If you really can’t be virtuous and make exceptions, have I in fact robbed my sisters?” he wondered, first picking up and then dropping his money packages back onto the table.

— Père Goriot

Ay, ay; money’s a good egg; and if you’ve got money to leave behind you, lay it in a warm nest.

— Middlemarch

I was being hornswoggled by everything and everybody, women, money, and ideas.

— Journey to the End of the Night

But for nearly fifteen years I had paid his debts, hushed up his scandals, and answered his letters without delay; delightful letters they were, but they always ended with requests for money for himself, or for advancement for his friends.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

Most of them, moreover, had spent their money.

— Sons and Lovers

If you need money, I will give it to you.

— Anna Karenina

‘Well, you just own up, first, that you did hide that money there, intending to give me the slip one of these days, and come back and dig it up, and have it all to yourself.’

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Then, when he is paying her, he realizes he has only useless money, probably Moroccan coins.

— History

The complacent smile, the tolerant nod, is not even confined to the cultivated healers, or the professors; it’s the property of the money-changers, the little jackals of the press, the enemy.

— The Golden Notebook

Once she’d realized that he couldn’t be tempted, and that all her finery had been a waste of money, it did not take her long to understand why.

— Père Goriot

I think that’s why he felt so humiliated when he thought of it, and it was at that moment that I made my mistake: I suddenly blurted out that if this two hundred rubles wasn’t enough to enable him to move to another town, he’d be given more, and that, in fact, I had some money of my own and he could have as much of it as he needed.

— The Brothers Karamazov

First of all, some money was found in his cash-box and, in the second place, he could have opened the envelope that morning or even the previous day, disposed of the money in some other way, paid it out, sent it away, or he could have changed his mind and modified his plan of action altogether, without feeling that he had to keep Smerdyakov informed of his latest intentions.

— The Brothers Karamazov

We are not avaricious, no, but you must give us lots and lots of money, and then you will see how generous we are, and you will be able to admire the scorn with which we scatter the despicable metal to the winds in wild, unrestrained revelry!

— The Brothers Karamazov

And to Mr. Bulstrode God’s cause was something distinct from his own rectitude of conduct: it enforced a discrimination of God’s enemies, who were to be used merely as instruments, and whom it would be as well if possible to keep out of money and consequent influence.

— Middlemarch

You try going to Australia now, someone said to me, and you won’t see a sheep anywhere, for love nor money.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

First of all, some money was found in his cash-box and, in the second place, he could have opened the envelope that morning or even the previous day, disposed of the money in some other way, paid it out, sent it away, or he could have changed his mind and modified his plan of action altogether, without feeling that he had to keep Smerdyakov informed of his latest intentions.

— The Brothers Karamazov

If he comes to, though, I’ll be in the clear, for he’ll be witness that Mr. Dmitry did come, so they’ll be sure that it was he who did the killing and took the money too.

— The Brothers Karamazov

‘But what happened to the money then,’ you may ask me, ‘since no money was found when the house was searched later?’

— The Brothers Karamazov

You’ll want some money.

— Great Expectations

Told her I’d think it over—money, the practical side.

— The Golden Notebook

With the money you’ll have, and the brain you’ve already got, you’ll pile up just as big a fortune as you want.

— Père Goriot

She started to tell the story, and she told everything, the whole story that Mitya had told Alyosha, including her deep gratitude and her “prostration” before him; in explaining why she had needed the money, she told of her father’s troubles and of her going to Mitya’s lodgings…

— The Brothers Karamazov

And as to being in a hurry to put money into schemes—it won’t do, you know.

— Middlemarch

Hence one denies their existence, just as the common man denies the existence of the air, insisting that it is mere emptiness; but it seems that precisely this is what lends life a certain spectral quality—the fact that everything that is denied reality, everything that is colourless, odourless, tasteless, imponderable and non-moral, like water, air, space, money and the passing of time, is in reality what is most important.

— The Man Without Qualities

The bailiff went over to Ivan, took the money, and handed it to the presiding judge.

— The Brothers Karamazov

But he has money; he will be——’ and stopped, with that forlorn little boy invisible between them who had come there eight years ago with the overall jumper over what remained of his silk and broadcloth, who had become the youth in uniform—the tattered hat and the overalls—of his ancient curse, who had become the young man with a young man’s potence yet was still that lonely child in his parchment-and-denim hairshirt, and your grandfather speaking the lame vain words, the specious and empty fallacies which we call comfort, thinking Better that he were dead, better that he had never lived: then thinking what vain and empty recapitulation that would be to her if he were to say it, who doubtless had already said it, thought it, changing only the person and the number. 

— Absalom, Absalom!

Next morning, Monday, after disposing of the embalmed head to a barber, for a block, I settled my own and comrade’s bill; using, however, my comrade’s money.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

But, according to the accused’s own admission, he had an even more important reason for not tearing open the rag: ‘As long as I have that money on me,’ he says he felt, ‘I may be a scoundrel but I’m not a thief, because I can always go to the woman I have betrayed, lay the remaining half of the misappropriated sum before her, and say to her, “See, I may have spent half your money and thus shown my weakness and lack of firm principles, shown myself to be, if you wish, a scoundrel”’—I am using the accused’s own language—‘“but I am, nevertheless, not a thief, for if I were, I would not have returned the remaining half of the money to you, but would have kept it and used it as I had the first half.”’

— The Brothers Karamazov

They knew Peter’s maxim, that money was a good egg, and should be laid in a warm nest.

— Middlemarch

They are refusing emotion because at the end of every emotion are property, money, power.

— The Golden Notebook

“Your money or your life!”

— The Brothers Karamazov

A husband who complains about his wife’s conduct covers himself with ridicule (a thing that is becoming less dangerous every day in France); but his wife, if he doesn’t give her any money, is reduced to the condition of a working woman, at fifteen sous a day, and even then, virtuous women will hesitate to employ her.

— The Red and the Black
death

“I’m waiting for Death, Susana.”

— Pedro Páramo

The first article in that fine oath that Greece swore and kept in the Median war was that each man would sooner exchange life for death than his country’s laws for those of Persia.

— Essays

The sight of that poor old man shouldn’t have thrown me into this awful fit of depression unless I was to die of old age like everyone else; but a quick death in the prime of life will save me from that same pitiful decrepitude.

— The Red and the Black

His Excellency is now quite sure that this so-called Vautrin, who lodges at Maison Vauquer, is in fact an escaped convict from Toulon Penitentiary, where he’s known as ‘Death-Dodger’”

— Père Goriot

——One must not give him his death, however,—interrupted my father.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

A whole world was appearing before me, composed of compassion, renunciation and air: Buddha’s mansions, the women in the harem, the golden coach, the three fateful encounters—with the old man, with the sick man, with death; the flight, the ascetic life, the deliverance, the proclaiming of salvation.

— Zorba the Greek

Franz wrestles and waits for Death, for merciful Death.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

‘And it might seem good to leave all this vileness and confusion, other people’s and one’s own, but I’m afraid of death, terribly afraid of death.’

— Anna Karenina

It bores me to death.

— The Man Without Qualities

She remained in the coma for almost two weeks and two days ago she died without regaining consciousness and without pain they say and whatever they mean by that since it has always seemed to me that the only painless death must be that which takes the intelligence by violent surprise and from the rear so to speak since if death be anything at all beyond a brief and peculiar emotional state of the bereaved it must be a brief and likewise peculiar state of the subject as well and if aught can be more painful to any intelligence above that of a child or an idiot than a slow and gradual confronting with that which over a long period of bewilderment and dread it has been taught to regard as an irrevocable and unplumbable finality, I do not know it.

— Absalom, Absalom!

‘I work, I want to do something, and I’ve forgotten that everything will end, that there is — death.’

— Anna Karenina

“My death!” Grandma Henrouille was shrieking now.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Some years later it was death which was to become the object of my constant contemplation, the thought to which I was to give every faculty of my mind not absorbed by the State.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

Monsieur Roque gave his view that there had never been anything so sublime as the way the archbishop had died; Fumichon thought that the general’s death had been even more noble; and instead of being content merely to express sorrow at the two murders, they launched into an argument as to which was the more shocking.

— A Sentimental Education

Admittedly they hit each other over the head and spat at each other, but this they did only because of higher cultural considerations, just as it also happens that, for instance, a man who would not hurt a fly, if he were alone and eye to eye with it, when he is seated under the image of the Crucified One in a court of law will condemn another man to death.

— The Man Without Qualities

Death-Dodger!

— Père Goriot

If they were, they’d all starve to death!

— Children of Gebelawi

Finally the death rattle began; his hands were growing cold, his face started to turn pale.

— A Sentimental Education

She said the word often enough, and there could be no doubt that she meant to say it; but if the often repeated word had been hate instead of love—despair—revenge—dire death—it could not have sounded from her lips more like a curse.

— Great Expectations

But after one has experienced and understood many things, to cling on, not to go down into death, not to slip away, but to stretch, to feel, to present oneself with one’s soul and stand there, that amounts to something.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

“That death pained me in more ways than one,” said Terencio Lubianes.

— Pedro Páramo

The road to the world beyond the senses, public lectures, All Saints’ Day: Is Death Really the End? Monday, 21 November, 8 p.m.: Is Faith Still Possible? Tuesday, 22 November: Can Man Change? Wednesday, 23 November: Who Is Just Before God?

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

Now as for my spirits, little have I to lay to their charge—nay so very little (unless the mounting me upon a long stick, and playing the fool with me nineteen hours out of the twenty-four, be accusations) that on the contrary, I have much—much to thank ‘em for: cheerily have ye made me tread the path of life with all the burdens of it (except its cares) upon my back; in no one moment of my existence, that I remember, have ye once deserted me, or tinged the objects which came in my way, either with sable, or with a sickly green; in dangers ye gilded my horizon with hope, and when DEATH himself knocked at my door—ye bad him come again; and in so gay a tone of careless indifference, did ye do it, that he doubted of his commission——

“—There must certainly be some mistake in this matter,” quoth he.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Death is chasing you, you’ve got to hurry, and while you’re looking you’ve got to eat, and keep away from wars.

— Journey to the End of the Night

For only in possessing this woman had Eugène realized that, till then, he had simply desired rather than loved her: happiness had created love, since love is sometimes nothing more than the acknowledgement of pleasure.

— Père Goriot

The brown beard yelled: ‘Put him to death, when did I say put him to death?

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

Nor that when he sees death coming he stretches out his neck and says: Cut off my head, please, so that I can go to heaven!

— Zorba the Greek

My fear is so bad that if I die a natural death later on, I especially don’t want to be cremated.

— Journey to the End of the Night

It’s death to come back.

— Great Expectations

The news of the death of Parfen Denisych had an unpleasant affect on him.

— Anna Karenina

To the anatomical right of this car, on the trim turf of the lawn-slope, an old gentleman with a white mustache, well-dressed — doublebreasted gray suit, polkadotted bow-tie — lay supine, his long legs together, like a death-size wax figure.

— Lolita

“A sort of hush: the whole night, wondering, and asleep: I suppose that’s what we do in death: sleep on wonder.”

— Sons and Lovers

My vengeance is my guilt:

Death must be paid with death, crime piled on crime,

Bloodshed on bloodshed.

— Metamorphoses