love
money
death
love

And this malady which Swann’s love had become had so proliferated, was so closely interwoven with all his habits, with all his actions, with his thoughts, his health, his sleep, his life, even with what he hoped for after his death, was so utterly inseparable from him, that it would have been impossible to eradicate it without almost entirely destroying him; as surgeons say, his love was no longer operable.

— In Search of Lost Time

If there are civilians who are belligerent by nature, why then should there not be officers who love the arts of peace?

— The Man Without Qualities

His was a love based on nothing more than Mathilde’s rare beauty, or rather, on her queenly manner and marvelous dress.

— The Red and the Black

Home was home, and they loved it with a passion of love, whatever the suffering had been.

— Sons and Lovers

There appeared upon the scene—say at the races, or the public balls, or anywhere else you like—a certain man, who made love to Miss Havisham.

— Great Expectations

But Dolly was struck by that temporary beauty which women have in moments of love and which she now found in Anna’s face.

— Anna Karenina

What I am going to say to thee, is upon the nature of women, and of love-making to them; and perhaps it is as well for thee—tho’ not so well for me—that thou hast occasion for a letter of instructions upon that head, and that I am able to write it to thee.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

At such moments everything adds to your loathsome distress, forcing you in your weakened state to see things, people, and the future as they are, that is, as skeletons, as nothings, which you will nevertheless have to love, cherish, and defend as if they existed.

— Journey to the End of the Night

The very air seemed to him to be drunk with love, and love seemed to mean disaster, but he said to himself: ‘His face was pure and gentle.

— Children of Gebelawi

‘Good by-aye!’ she chanted, my American sweet immortal dead love; for she is dead and immortal if you are reading this.

— Lolita

Ah, in those earliest days of love how naturally the kisses spring into life!

— In Search of Lost Time

I’ve come to love it so much, in fact, that it’s really quite disgusting.

— The Brothers Karamazov

She was using the word ‘love’ already, and with a naivety quite foreign to her normal way of analysing relationships.

— The Golden Notebook

And Jove replied: ‘The child is yours and mine,

Our common care and love.

— Metamorphoses

Not a man of them, sir, would be bold enough to try it on, for love or money.

— Great Expectations

Even allowing that she was pretty—which she wasn’t—how could she possibly have interested him even for one minute when he was in love with somebody else?

— A Sentimental Education

This body deprived of life was their love, the first period of their love.

— Anna Karenina

At present, I hope I shall be sufficiently understood, in telling the reader, my uncle Toby fell in love:

—Not that the phrase is at all to my liking: for to say a man is fallen in love,—or that he is deeply in love,—or up to the ears in love,—and sometimes even over head and ears in it,—carries an idiomatical kind of implication, that love is a thing below a man:—this is recurring again to Plato’s opinion, which, with all his divinityship,—I hold to be damnable and heretical;—and so much for that.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

But when, after a year in the country, Levin came back to Moscow at the beginning of that winter and saw the Shcherbatsky’s, he realized which of the three he had really been destined to fall in love with.

— Anna Karenina

‘Then we should find some artificial inoculation against love, as with smallpox.’

— Anna Karenina

And it was only out of pride that she responded to his feelings for her with love, a hysterical, twisted love made up of offended pride, a love that resembled revenge more than love.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And invariably the charm of all the fancies which the thought of cathedrals used to inspire in me, the charm of the hills and valleys of the Ile-de-France and of the plains of Normandy, would be reflected in the picture I had formed in my mind’s eye of Mlle Swann; nothing more remained but to know and to love her.

— In Search of Lost Time

Oh, we shall allow them to sin too, for, weak and defenseless as they are, they will love us like children if we allow them to sin.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Love man in his sin too, for such love resembles God’s love, the highest possible form of love on earth.

— The Brothers Karamazov

It seemed to her that if he knew it, he would stop loving her sooner; and she feared nothing so much now, though she had no reason for it, as losing his love.

— Anna Karenina

The unexpected result was that Diotima’s soul, temporarily unsupervised by the higher faculties, behaved like a schoolboy set free from school who careers around until the moment when he is overwhelmed by the mournfulness of his senseless liberty; and as a result of this remarkable circumstance there for a short time entered into her relations with her husband, and in spite of increasing alienation, something that strangely resembled, if not love’s late springtide, at least then a blend of all the seasons of love.

— The Man Without Qualities

And she was wrong about his feelings: he did love his mother and disliked only what he called in his schoolboy lingo “that sickening slobbery stuff.”

— The Brothers Karamazov

I love you as much as Alyosha, you know.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Your greatness of mind in this action, which I admire, with that generous contempt of money which you shew me in the whole transaction, is really noble;—and what renders it more so, is the principle of it;—the workings of a parent’s love upon the truth and conviction of this very hypothesis, namely, That was your son called JUDAS,—the sordid and treacherous idea, so inseparable from the name, would have accompanied him thro’ life like his shadow, and, in the end, made a miser and a rascal of him, in spight, Sir, of your example.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Do you love me?

— Anna Karenina

Tell me how much do you love him?

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

What have I done to deserve so much love?

— The Brothers Karamazov

I’m proud enough never to allow myself to love a man who does not love me.

— Anna Karenina
money

Although she was well aware that he was deceiving her (being fully convinced that now she would have to bear everything, including even his faithlessness), she nevertheless put three thousand rubles at his disposal, letting him understand quite clearly that she was offering him this money to betray her with.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Is it because he’s stupider than I am and has managed to pour lots of money down the drain with nothing to show for it?

— The Brothers Karamazov

The thought of Frédéric’s money made him angry.

— A Sentimental Education

But just as he had tried opium, so his thought now began to turn upon gambling—not with appetite for its excitement, but with a sort of wistful inward gaze after that easy way of getting money, which implied no asking and brought no responsibility.

— Middlemarch

In fact, of the four earlier IOU’s, only one had been paid, any money she might have received in the interim having gone towards other needs …

— A Sentimental Education

And he only became engaged to me because of all the money I inherited.

— The Brothers Karamazov

But the Petersburg view of money matters had an especially soothing effect on Stepan Arkadyich.

— Anna Karenina

He never mentioned money to me, but in his secret heart he thought of it all the time.

— Journey to the End of the Night

I am by no means sure that your son, in his recklessness and ignorance—I will use no severer word—has not tried to raise money by holding out his future prospects, or even that some one may not have been foolish enough to supply him on so vague a presumption: there is plenty of such lax money-lending as of other folly in the world.

— Middlemarch

I’ve certainly committed some follies, like everybody else, but money is the least thing, I’m not sorry about it.

— Anna Karenina

I took the money, planning to give it back to her later.

— The Brothers Karamazov

“I’ve saved up money!” he cried out suddenly.

— The Red and the Black

If he could bring her to feel with some solemnity that here was a slander which must be met and not run away from, and that the whole trouble had come out of his desperate want of money, it would be a moment for urging powerfully on her that they should be one in the resolve to do with as little money as possible, so that they might weather the bad time and keep themselves independent.

— Middlemarch

“It was one of their first tricks!” Davide went on, all the same, “and they, with this trick of money, have bought our whole life.

— History

It’s a whole story,” Alyosha said, as if he, too, were exclusively preoccupied with his failure to get Snegirev to accept the money, although Lise could see that he, too, was looking away and trying not to broach a certain subject.

— The Brothers Karamazov

‘I hear,’ I said to her, ‘that your papa is short four thousand five hundred rubles of government money.’

— The Brothers Karamazov

My worldly affairs began to wear a gloomy appearance and I was pressed for money by more than one creditor.

— Great Expectations

Well, the first time I saw him in his office I felt confused—I know you’re going to say it’s the power he has, all that money.

— The Golden Notebook

And he launched into a bitter, mocking attack on this aged money-grubber with his wig, pointing out that such a relationship was degrading and she ought to break it off.

— A Sentimental Education

In the shelter, besides the usual families from those parts, some other people also happened in: casual passersby, or else some homeless characters: beggars, cheap prostitutes, and black marketeers (with whom Nino, always on the prowl for money, on those nights plotted certain minimal and mysterious deals).

— History

Unlike the first, the second wife came from an old and distinguished family and was the daughter of a general, although, as far as I know, she did not bring the Lieutenant Colonel any money either.

— The Brothers Karamazov

—His character was,——he loved a jest in his heart—and as he saw himself in the true point of ridicule, he would say, he could not be so angry with others for seeing him in a light, in which he so strongly saw himself: So that to his friends, who knew his foible was not the love of money, and who therefore made the less scruple in bantering the extravagance of his humour,—instead of giving the true cause,——he chose rather to join in the laugh against himself; and as he never carried one single ounce of flesh upon his own bones, being altogether as spare a figure as his beast,—he would sometimes insist upon it, that the horse was as good as the rider deserved;—that they were, centaur-like,—both of a piece.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

And don’t drool over my publications, they’re expensive, cost money, and stop soiling the covers and all.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

We’ll soon be rolling in money, and we can do all we said.

— Zorba the Greek

He regretted that he had not at once made even an unreasonable money-sacrifice.

— Middlemarch

Only he was a crook, and so the airman’s money went very straightforwardly to the crook, and the airman has no money left.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

What bothered me most about all this was the money box.

— Journey to the End of the Night

They can’t see anything else, the bitches, but the hand that brings out the money and lets it flow away like a basket with a hole in it.

— Zorba the Greek

It has been said that money was stolen, namely, three thousand rubles, but no one knows for a fact that the money actually existed.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And what are we doing with our money?

— Middlemarch

But now the money in the bank had come to an end and he did not quite know where to get more.

— Anna Karenina

Indeed, had he kept quiet, if only about the money, and then killed his master and taken the money, no one in the world could ever have accused him of murdering for money, because no one but him had seen that money or knew there was such a sum of money in the house.

— The Brothers Karamazov

The rent was correspondingly low, but all the rest—getting the place into a state of good repair and bringing it into line with modern ideas of comfort—had cost an unexpectedly large amount of money.

— The Man Without Qualities
death

He had always been afraid of life, and now he attached his fear to something different, to death, to his blood pressure, just as for forty years he had attached it to the peril of not being able to finish paying for the house.

— Journey to the End of the Night

But then the manifestation of death is just as terrifying in an important or in an insignificant person; he who just yesterday had been walking about, playing cards, signing papers, who had so often been seen in the company of officials with his bushy eyebrows and winking eye, was now stretched out on a table.

— Dead Souls

Whereupon the two brothers made all necessary arrangements, using his own money to see that he had an honourable funeral, and sending news of his death to the friars and asking them to come that evening to observe the customary vigil, and the following morning to take away the body.

— The Decameron

Where were they taking them and what death had they prepared?

— Children of Gebelawi

Cattle breeder was attacked by a bull on his farm and gored to death.

— Season of Migration to the North

My vengeance is my guilt:

Death must be paid with death, crime piled on crime,

Bloodshed on bloodshed.

— Metamorphoses

I had an uncle once who found an old mule on the point of death.

— Zorba the Greek

She has had a poor opinion of the physicians since my father’s death.

— Middlemarch

The terrible thing in this sort of grief is that, unlike anything else — a loss, a death — one cannot simply bear one’s cross.

— Anna Karenina

On the green grass

He drooped his weary head, and those bright eyes

That loved their master’s beauty closed in death.

— Metamorphoses

Who then could blame the leader of that forlorn party which after all has climbed high enough to see the waste of the years and the perishing of stars, if before death stiffens his limbs beyond the power of movement he does a little consciously raise his numbed fingers to his brow, and square his shoulders, so that when the search party comes they will find him dead at his post, the fine figure of a soldier?

— To the Lighthouse

What am I saying! half a company, were it only fifty men, but ready to fight and devoted to the good cause, in life as in death.

— The Red and the Black

The two women were running to and fro in the death chamber, chanting their mirologues while they feverishly rummaged in every little corner.

— Zorba the Greek

The scream grew more and more remote as I realized the melancholy fact that neither tomorrow, nor Friday, nor any other day or night, could I make myself put her to death.

— Lolita

Yet habit—strange thing! what cannot habit accomplish?—Gayer sallies, more merry mirth, better jokes, and brighter repartees, you never heard over your mahogany, than you will hear over the half-inch white cedar of the whale-boat, when thus hung in hangman’s nooses; and, like the six burghers of Calais before King Edward, the six men composing the crew pull into the jaws of death, with a halter around every neck, as you may say.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

I dislike the fact that in such a saintly government as the Lacedaemonian should be found such a hypocritical ceremony as this: At the death of the kings all the confederates and neighbors, all the Helots, men, women, and all, would cut their foreheads as a token of mourning and say in their cries and lamentations that that one, whatever he may have been, was the best king they ever had; attributing to rank the praise that belonged to merit, and the praise that belonged to the highest merit to the latest and lowest rank.

— Essays

For the first time death seemed horrible to him.

— The Red and the Black

From the death chamber uncle Anagnosti and Kondomanolio came bareheaded and crossed themselves.

— Zorba the Greek

Death and other striking dispositions, such as feminine trustfulness, had come; and Bulstrode would have adopted Cromwell’s words—“Do you call these bare events? The Lord pity you!”

— Middlemarch

He is petty, selfish, vain, egotistical; he is spoilt; he is a tyrant; he wears Mrs Ramsay to death; but he has what you (she addressed Mr Bankes) have not; a fiery unworldliness; he knows nothing about trifles; he loves dogs and his children.

— To the Lighthouse

It seems to me that ever since I can remember anything the real thing that has been happening in the world was death and destruction.

— The Golden Notebook

Sleep took possession of me, just as one day—nothing is more certain—death will do, and I slipped gently into darkness.

— Zorba the Greek

Delivering one’s brothers from the yoke is a goal worthy of both death and life.

— Anna Karenina

“Amidst all these lofty thoughts about nonbeing, death, the infinite, etcetera, I see nothing genuine except a disgusting fear of ridicule.”

— The Red and the Black

No! no time to think about Death then.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

And by the same token there would be so much love that Death would be shut up inside it with tenderness, and Death would be so cosy-comfortable in there, the bitch, that she’d finally start enjoying herself, she’d get pleasure out of love along with everyone else.

— Journey to the End of the Night

I could ha’ got clear of these death-cold flats likewise—look at my leg: you won’t find much iron on it—if I hadn’t made discovery that he was here.

— Great Expectations

Death spins his coat and sings: oh yes, oh yes.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

A moment later she added, inarticulate with rage: “No, but, don’t you agree, the filthy creature…” unwittingly using, perhaps in obedience to the same obscure need to justify herself—like Françoise at Combray, when the chicken refused to die—the very words which the last convulsions of an inoffensive animal in its death throes wring from the peasant who is engaged in taking its life.

— In Search of Lost Time

Obadiah did the same thing, as soon as he had left the letter upon the table which brought the news of my brother’s death; so that before my father had well got over his surprize, and entered upon his harangue,—had Trim got upon his legs, to speak his sentiments upon the subject.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

It did not take the form it had assumed in the East, where if anyone bled from the nose it was an obvious portent of certain death.

— The Decameron

‘About life, about death; about Mrs Ramsay’ — no, she thought, one could say nothing to nobody.

— To the Lighthouse

M. de Croisnois’ death altered all of Julien’s plans for Mathilde’s future; he spent several days proving to her that she ought to accept M. de Luz’s hand.

— The Red and the Black