love
money
death
love

I wondered if I wanted to make love with that woman he was with now.

— The Golden Notebook

Never in my life — not even when fondling my child-love in France — never —

— Lolita

Saying: I’m not going to have a baby with a man who doesn’t love me.

— The Golden Notebook

As he walked along, Eugène took extraordinary precautions to keep himself from being mud-spattered, but his mind was busily rehearsing what he would say to Madame de Restaud, shaping witty observations, inventing clever rejoinders to imaginary sallies, readying a stock of noble expressions, words worthy of Talleyrand, conjuring up little details that might help along the declaration of love on which he was basing his entire future.

— Père Goriot

If you no longer love me, I forgive you.

— The Red and the Black

In love!——said the corporal—your honour was very well the day before yesterday, when I was telling your honour the story of the King of Bohemia—Bohemia! said my uncle Toby— — — — musing a long time — — — What became of that story Trim?

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

For the love of God, Eva, for the love of God, the love of God.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

Then, consumed by eternal love, you will pray to the birds, too.

— The Brothers Karamazov

All his friends were accustomed to receive, from time to time, letters calling on them for a word of recommendation or introduction, with a diplomatic adroitness which, persisting throughout all his successive love affairs and varying pretexts, revealed, more glaringly than the clumsiest indiscretion, a permanent disposition and an identical quest.

— In Search of Lost Time

The lad loves Mary, and a true love for a good woman is a great thing, Susan.

— Middlemarch

Mrs. Bridget had pawn’d all the little stock of honour a poor chambermaid was worth in the world, that she would get to the bottom of the affair in ten days; and it was built upon one of the most concessible postulatums in nature: namely, that whilst my uncle Toby was making love to her mistress, the Corporal could find nothing better to do, than make love to her——“And I’ll let him as much as he will,” said Bridget, “to get it out of him.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Tell me, do I still love that man, or don’t I?

— The Brothers Karamazov

Indeed, men of noble character, whose love is pure and who would sacrifice anything for the woman they love, can very easily hide under tables, bribe unspeakable people, and indulge in such vile acts as spying and eavesdropping.

— The Brothers Karamazov

That’s why I asked you, and why I ask you, have you ever been immoderately in love or angry or desperate.

— The Man Without Qualities

Had the pleasures of a dance or a ball brought their rosy hues to her pale face; had the delights of elegant living reddened cheeks already grown faintly hollow; had love quickened those sad eyes, Victorine might have campaigned against the prettiest of young girls.

— Père Goriot

I tell you what, you make the lady really love you.

— Père Goriot

He who has kissed by the beautiful sea, while the billows listened and rippled with mirth, he knows what life’s greatest charm can be, he has whispered to love upon this earth.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

He was not so much scientifically as humanly in love with science.

— The Man Without Qualities

Take the spiritualists, for example (I love them, by the way): would you believe it—they’re sure they are helpful to the propagation of the faith just because the devils allow them to peek into the other world and have a glimpse at their horns, which is supposed to be material proof that the ‘other world’ exists.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Had it been the good pleasure of him who disposes of our lots—and thou no sufferer by the knowledge, I had been well content that thou should’st have dipp’d the pen this moment into the ink, instead of myself; but that not being the case—————Mrs. Shandy being now close beside me, preparing for bed——I have thrown together without order, and just as they have come into my mind, such hints and documents as I deem may be of use to thee; intending, in this, to give thee a token of my love; not doubting, my dear Toby, of the manner in which it will be accepted.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

‘Why wouldn’t I sweetie, come here, love for a Sechser.’

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

As history pours out of my fissured body, my lotus is quietly dripping in, with her down-to-earthery, and her paradoxical superstition, her contradictory love of the fabulous — so it’s appropriate that I’m about to tell the story of the death of Mian Abdullah.

— Midnight's Children

‘But for your love remaining in us, we’d hate people for ever.’

— Children of Gebelawi

“For there can live no hatred in thine eye,

Therefore in that I cannot know thy change:

In many’s looks the false heart’s history

Is writ in moods and frowns and wrinkles strange;

But Heaven in thy creation did decree

That in thy face sweet love should ever dwell;

Whate’er thy thoughts or thy heart’s workings be,

Thy looks should nothing thence but sweetness tell.”

— Middlemarch

“If, as I have, you also doe,

Vertue attired in woman see,

And dare love that, and say so too,

And forget the He and She;

 

And if this love, though placed so,

From prophane men you hide,

Which will no faith on this bestow,

Or, if they doe, deride:

 

Then you have done a braver thing

Than all the Worthies did,

And a braver thence will spring,

Which is, to keep that hid.”

— Middlemarch

In his verse he never spoke of anything but love and the sky and the stars.

— In Search of Lost Time

I’m sorry for him, and that doesn’t go well with love.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Our house is Rifaaite; all the people in it are followers of Rifaa, and the storytellers tell every night how he lived and died for the sake of love and happiness; and yet the first thing we hear every morning is their quarrels and curses.

— Children of Gebelawi

And accordingly both she and several other ladies quickly divined his motive, and often jested with one anther to see a man of such great age and wisdom caught in the toils of love.

— The Decameron

The fact is—in every profession that is followed not for the sake of money but for love, there comes a moment when the advancing years seem to be leading into the void.

— The Man Without Qualities

For him she was the one island not only of kindly disposition but of love amidst the sea of hostility and mockery that surrounded him.

— Anna Karenina

She began a better sister than a mother,

Determined to appease with blood the shades

Whose blood was hers, for love’s sake crushing love.

— Metamorphoses

Oh boohoo, you don’t love me, you don’t love, men don’t love women any more.

— The Golden Notebook
money

But Franz just takes a few pennies and decides: I’m not going to take that money, I need to be independent.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

So the little money he left as inheritance was all spent on satisfying his last wish.

— History

But, unfortunately, no amount of money and property, with or without improvements, is exchangeable for a stomach like this gentleman’s, who is otherwise a lesser type.

— Dead Souls

Then he lifted his hand to put them in the breast of his smock, but Daabas stopped him with one hand and held out the other hand for the money.

— Children of Gebelawi

Anyway, it’s just me against the government and its whole pile of courts and cops, and its heaps of money, and I say screw them all.

— Père Goriot

Then we’ll find the money and avoid a nasty battle.

— Children of Gebelawi

If I could have kept him away by paying money, I certainly would have paid money.

— Great Expectations

Knowing all that, I offered him the money under the pretext that I wanted to send it to my sister in Moscow.

— The Brothers Karamazov

For to labor with dignity in the vineyards of the Lord, and not to be altogether unworthy of one’s erudite fellow laborers, one needed instruction; it was necessary to spend two very expensive years at the seminary in Besançon; it was thus indispensable, and one might even say one’s duty, to save money, which was much easier to do on a salary of eight hundred francs paid quarterly than with six hundred francs, which were eaten up from month to month.

— The Red and the Black

We know people are short of money.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

How long are you going to keep quiet while your wishes are ignored and your money’s wasted?

— Children of Gebelawi

“But what happened to the money you had?” he asked me at one point.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Apparently, the father had only been good at giving advice on saving money, and not so good at doing so himself.

— Dead Souls

And if you want to know who Pums is: he’s the sleeping partner in at least five small fur businesses—never you mind where—plus he’s invested money in a couple of American-style launderettes, with ironing boards in the windows, and a tailor standing there in shirtsleeves, and the suits are hanging at the back, the suits, oh, yes indeedy.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

Did he steal the money?

— The Brothers Karamazov

Daabas hit him hard, and screeched:

‘My money! Before I break your bones!’

— Children of Gebelawi

Will had given a disinterested attention to an intended settlement on a new plan in the Far West, and the need for funds in order to carry out a good design had set him on debating with himself whether it would not be a laudable use to make of his claim on Bulstrode, to urge the application of that money which had been offered to himself as a means of carrying out a scheme likely to be largely beneficial.

— Middlemarch

Grushenka, of course, had money, but Mitya’s pride would keep him from touching it: he had to pay for their journey himself and then earn their living by his own efforts; he could not live on her capital.

— The Brothers Karamazov

I bought myself two belts, and a little awl for putting eyelets in my corset, and some other foolishnesses, so that I have less money than that fat Agatha, who is horribly thrifty and piles up her pennies like a magpie.

— Père Goriot

Never has vanity at grips with everything that is most sour and meanest about the paltry love of money reduced a man to a sorrier state of mind than that M. de Rênal was in when he entered the cabaret.

— The Red and the Black

Yet she could see him, clearly, putting money on a mantlepiece.

— The Golden Notebook

Well, they get some money together, a coupla hundred, only Reinhold sticks to his guns and refuses to chip in, and someone is deputed to go up and see Biberkopf, sometime when Herbert Wischow’s not around.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

“It really seems a little too bad to have to ride a broken-winded hunter, and see men, who are not half such good judges as yourself, able to throw away any amount of money on buying bad bargains.”

— Middlemarch

Why, he was worrying himself sick about not having any money for such an eventuality!

— The Brothers Karamazov

Well, pretty soon the old man was up and around again, and then he went for Judge Thatcher in the courts to make him give up that money, and he went for me, too, for not stopping school.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

‘And how much money is wanting to complete the purchase?’

— Great Expectations

According to her, she had nursed an old man suffering from cysts in his bladder, abandoned by his children because they’d thought he had no money.

— Père Goriot

He gives the MAN money

— The Recognition of Śakuntalā

The business I’m going for, the warrant and the money, won’t have come by tomorrow,’ he replied.

— Anna Karenina

And on the other…’ (he faltered) ‘hand, its a way for the district coterie to make a little money.

— Anna Karenina

Bulstrode seems the most unsympathetic fellow I ever saw about some people, and yet he has taken no end of trouble, and spent a great deal of money, on benevolent objects.

— Middlemarch

I can’t even give that child of mine money?

— The Golden Notebook

His face was round and had rather a look of the typical family man with just enough money to put down the caution required of army officers intending to marry, but no more than that.

— The Man Without Qualities
death

The emperor had lost hold on the City, where he could no longer maintain himself except by resort to executions, which in turn hastened his own end; the whole army joined in plotting his death.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

But the truth was that Naseem Aziz was very anxious; because while Aziz’s death by starvation would be a clear demonstration of the superiority of her idea of the world over his, she was unwilling to be widowed for a mere principle; yet she could see no way out of the situation which did not involve her in backing down and losing face, and having learned to bare her face, my grandmother was most reluctant to lose any of it.

— Midnight's Children

The wind increased to a howl; the waves dashed their bucklers together; the whole squall roared, forked, and crackled around us like a white fire upon the prairie, in which, unconsumed, we were burning; immortal in these jaws of death!

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

The elder’s death came quite unexpectedly.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Death had come between us and so had life …

— Journey to the End of the Night

“A clear test”, he said,

“Shall prove if this be god or mortal man

And certify the truth”, and planned for me,

At dead of night, when I was sunk in sleep,

Death unforeseen—so would he test the truth.

— Metamorphoses

“Death-Dodger would never let a woman get anywhere near him,” said the detective.

— Père Goriot

His passionate love for his wife, defeated by death, was transferred to his two daughters, and at first they gave him all the emotional satisfaction he could want.

— Père Goriot

Death holds less pain than does the wait for death.

— Essays

He had just seen death in all its ugliness.

— The Red and the Black

As soon as I heard of the death of Sawaaris, damn him, I hurried to you bringing my enemies’ sheep.

— Children of Gebelawi

These feeble defences raised by man against death were developed along two lines: the first consisted in presenting death to us as an inevitable evil, and in reminding us that neither beauty, youth, nor love escapes decay; life and its train of ills are thus proved even more horrible than death itself, and it is better, accordingly, to die than to grow old.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

Meditation upon death does not teach one how to die; it does not make the departure more easy, but ease is no longer what I seek.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

And on top of it all, the death of these same children.

— Anna Karenina

The first article in that fine oath that Greece swore and kept in the Median war was that each man would sooner exchange life for death than his country’s laws for those of Persia.

— Essays

That our happiness must not be judged until after our death

— Essays

The man who howled his grief upon a dead body has not ceased to wail in some corner of my being, in spite of the superhuman, or perhaps subhuman calm into which I am entering already; the voyager immured within the ever sedentary invalid is curious about death because it spells departure.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

For whose sake are you exposing yourself to death?

— Children of Gebelawi

And when they burn the body of their deceased king, all his wives and concubines, his favorites and all sorts of officers and servants—a whole nation in themselves—run so blithely to this fire to throw themselves in it with their master, that they seem to take honor in being companions of his death.

— Essays

Death doesn’t resemble slumber, I said, since in slumber one is alive and sleeping, and I don’t know how death can resemble anything at all for us, since we have no experience of it, nor anything to compare it to.

— The Book of Disquiet

“A dog’s death for a dog!”

— The Brothers Karamazov

Paris rang with the story of this death:—was it a murder?

— Middlemarch

She died hating Franz, his fury with her didn’t abate after her death.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

Every hour has its immediate duty, its special injunction which dominates all others: the problem of the moment was to defend from death the little that was left to me.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

But it was during the evil days at Antioch that her presence became indispensable to me, as was always her esteem in after times, an esteem which I kept till her death.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

Instead, it was my destiny to witness His death.

— History

I picked up another photograph and read the dedication which was in a bold, forward-slanting hand: ‘To you until death, Isabella.’

— Season of Migration to the North

This time the birth went badly; she herself came close to death, and had then to undergo an operation which meant that from now on she could never again be a mother.

— History

Trim took his off the ground,—put it upon his head,—and then went on with his oration upon death, in manner and form following.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

He who had been presented in the worst light at his trial, who had since broken prison and been tried again, who had returned from transportation under a life sentence, and who had occasioned the death of the man who was the cause of his arrest.

— Great Expectations

And your grandfather never knew if it was Clytie who watched, kept in touch by some means, waited for the day, the moment, to come, the hour when the little boy would be an orphan, and so went herself to fetch him; or if it was Judith who did the waiting and the watching and sent Clytie for him that winter, that December of 1871;—Clytie who had never been further from Sutpen’s Hundred than Jefferson in her life, yet who made that journey alone to New Orleans and returned with the child, the boy of twelve now and looking ten, in one of the outgrown Fauntleroy suits but with a new oversize overall jumper coat which Clytie had bought for him (and made him wear, whether against the cold or whether not your grandfather could not say either) over it and what else he owned tied up in a bandana handkerchief—this child who could speak no English as the woman could speak no French who had found him, hunted him down, in a French city and brought him away, this child with a face not old but without age, as if he had had no childhood, not in the sense that Miss Rosa Coldfield says she had no childhood, but as if he had not been human born but instead created without agency of man or agony of woman and orphaned by no human being (your grandfather said you did not wonder what had become of the mother, you did not ever care: death or elopement or marriage: who would not grow from one metamorphosis—dissolution or adultery—to the next carrying along with her all the old accumulated rubbish-years which we call memory, the recognisable I, but changing from phase to phase as the butterfly changes once the cocoon is cleared, carrying nothing of what was into what is, leaving nothing of what is behind but eliding complete and intact and unresisting into the next avatar as the overblown rose or magnolia elides from one rich June to the next, leaving no bones, no substance, no dust of whatever dead pristine soulless rich surrender anywhere between sun and earth) but produced complete and subject to no microbe in that cloyed and scented maze of shuttered silk as if he were the delicate and perverse spirit-symbol, immortal page of the ancient immortal Lilith, entering the actual world not at the age of one second but of twelve years, the delicate garments of his pagehood already half concealed beneath that harsh and shapeless denim cut to an iron pattern and sold by the millions—that burlesque uniform and regalia of the tragic burlesque of the sons of Ham;—a slight child who could not even speak English, picked suddenly up out of whatever debacle the only life he knew had disintegrated into, by a creature whom he had seen once and learned to dread and fear yet could not flee, held helpless and passive in a state which must have been some incredible compound of horror and trust, since although he could not even talk to her (they made, they must have made, that week’s journey by steamboat among the cotton bales on the freight deck, eating and sleeping with negroes, where he could not even tell his companion when he was hungry or when he had to relieve himself) and so could have only suspected, surmised, where she was taking him, could have known nothing certainly except that all he had ever been familiar with was vanishing about him like smoke, yet he made no resistance, returning quietly and docilely to that decaying house which he had seen one time, where the fierce brooding woman who had come and got him lived with the calm white one who was not even fierce, who was not anything except calm, who to him did not even have a name yet who was somehow so closely related to him as to be the owner of the one spot on earth where he had ever seen his mother weep;—returned, crossed that strange threshold, that irrevocable demarcation, not led, not dragged, but driven and herded by that stern implacable presence, into that gaunt and barren household where his very silken remaining clothes, his delicate shirt and stockings and shoes which still remained to remind him of what he had once been, vanished, fled from arms and body and legs as if they had been woven of chimaeras or of smoke.

— Absalom, Absalom!

The death of Mizuta, who had made a joke of Toriyama’s death, had now become a joke.

— The Sound of the Mountain

“These people will be the death of me,” the Director predicted with a sigh and slumped back into his armchair that was covered with dirty, rumpled, yellow canvas.

— Journey to the End of the Night