love
money
death
love

Just as before, she could only try to keep him by her love and her attractiveness.

— Anna Karenina

She had never thought that any man could love her except Fred, who had espoused her with the umbrella ring, when she wore socks and little strapped shoes; still less that she could be of any importance to Mr. Farebrother, the cleverest man in her narrow circle.

— Middlemarch

That meant, he had arranged with Jane, from my home, to meet her to make love, gone over, made love, come back, got into my bed, slept.

— The Golden Notebook

“And now good-morrow to our waking souls

Which watch not one another out of fear;

For love all love of other sights controls,

And makes one little room, an everywhere”

— Middlemarch

And she, she whose love he had believe in when he had despised himself, denied that their love had ever been love.

— Sons and Lovers

“Yes you love me, don’t you?” she murmured deep in her throat, almost as if she were in a trance, and swaying also as if she were swooned in an ecstasy of love.

— Sons and Lovers

Perhaps fodder and speed were the only great horse-passions left in such a case as that of Pepi and Hans, for they were geldings and did not know love as tangible desire, but only as a filmy haze that at times veiled their vision of the world with thin, lucent clouds.

— The Man Without Qualities

This proof of daughterly love touched old Roque.

— A Sentimental Education

Albeit Mme. de Rênal had never been interested in theories of love, a difference in age is, next to that in fortune, the great commonplace of provincial humor every time the subject is love.

— The Red and the Black

Despised love struck not with woe

That head of curly knots,

Nor stomach troubles laid him low,

Young Stephen Dowling Bots.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

“How much worthier is the man I love today than any with whom I was once on the verge of falling in love!” she thought, without being precisely aware of it.

— The Red and the Black

We shared the bonds of love and love’s concern;

Not Jove’s embraces would have pleased her more

Than mine, and me no other could have won,

Not Venus’ self.

— Metamorphoses

And to say that you love me without loving the medical man in me, is the same sort of thing as to say that you like eating a peach but don’t like its flavor.

— Middlemarch

A true act of love, unlike imaginary love, is hard and forbidding.

— The Brothers Karamazov

But still, in her heart of hearts, where the love should have burned, there was a blank.

— Sons and Lovers

Carried away by his unhappiness, thrown off by surprise, Julien was foolish enough to say to her, in the tenderest of tones and straight from the heart: “So you don’t love me anymore?”

— The Red and the Black

“Suppose tomorrow you were to become rich and happy, and some immense fortune came falling out of the clouds, would you still love the poor young man who wept for you, in your days of distress?”

— Père Goriot

He knew very well that by eight the next morning Mathilde would be in the library; he did not appear until nine o’clock, and though he was burning with love, his head commanded his heart.

— The Red and the Black

Love man in his sin too, for such love resembles God’s love, the highest possible form of love on earth.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Your whole future, you who are in love, sir, hinges on that great problem: Is this a prude who is weary of her trade, and ill-natured because she is unhappy?

— The Red and the Black

But I don’t accept life without love,’ he said, understanding Levin’s question in his own way.

— Anna Karenina

What art was there, known to love or cunning, by which one pressed through into those secret chambers?

— To the Lighthouse

“I must say our jokes are in really charming taste, my dear Charles… but how tiresome it is that I never see you now,” she went on in a winning tone, “I do so love talking to you.”

— In Search of Lost Time

I don’t want anything to do with love when I’m at work.

— Sons and Lovers

The unexpected result was that Diotima’s soul, temporarily unsupervised by the higher faculties, behaved like a schoolboy set free from school who careers around until the moment when he is overwhelmed by the mournfulness of his senseless liberty; and as a result of this remarkable circumstance there for a short time entered into her relations with her husband, and in spite of increasing alienation, something that strangely resembled, if not love’s late springtide, at least then a blend of all the seasons of love.

— The Man Without Qualities

It’s all the same if you don’t love me—if only you’re willing to marry me.

— The Brothers Karamazov

I loved stewed pineapple.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Sometimes, when she herself wearied of love talk, she tried to open her heart seriously to him.

— Sons and Lovers

It seems that reality is something that the worthy, practical realist does not ever wholly love and take seriously.

— The Man Without Qualities

I made love to her once.

— The Recognition of Śakuntalā

Say, has not the body of that love died, and left you its invulnerable soul!

— Sons and Lovers

He was ready to fall at her feet, prostrated by love and unhappiness, and cry: “Mercy!”

— The Red and the Black

Soon after, as was to be expected, an invitation arrived for the governor’s ball, a quite routine matter in provincial towns—where there’s a governor, there’s bound to be a ball, because otherwise he would lose the love and respect of the local notables.

— Dead Souls
money

Very good, some subtle observers may object, and what if the two of them acted in concert, what if they murdered him together and shared the money afterward?

— The Brothers Karamazov

I ain’ gwyne to len’ no mo’ money ‘dout I see de security.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Molly laughed it off, and said that country houses full of landed gentry and money were fun to visit but he was damned lucky not to have to live that life.

— The Golden Notebook

“There is one good chance—that he will not like to feel his money oozing away,” said Mrs. Cadwallader.

— Middlemarch

Mme. de Dubois is very much wrapped up in herself, like all women upon whom heaven has bestowed either too much nobility or too much money.

— The Red and the Black

William had just gone away to London, and his mother missed his money.

— Sons and Lovers

But now suppose you loved a woman, loved her to desperation, and she didn’t have the money she needed, lots of money for her clothes, for her carriage–for everything she’s always dreamed about?

— Père Goriot

And do you intend to let me have the money or will you send it directly to the treasury?

— Dead Souls

Once she’d realized that he couldn’t be tempted, and that all her finery had been a waste of money, it did not take her long to understand why.

— Père Goriot

Up to now I could at least tell myself: “They get the money, it’s true, and all the honors are heaped on them, but I, I have the nobility of heart.’

— The Red and the Black

Jim said he reckoned the people in that house stole the coat, because if they’d a knowed the money was there they wouldn’t a left it.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

In that case, I could see and touch the money, and I could not deny its existence, which is very different from the case at hand.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And so, having decided to commit the crime, he goes and reveals all the details about the money to another person—the accused—who, he knows, is extremely interested in that money, and he initiates him into every secret: where the money is hidden, what is written on the envelope, how to knock on the door to be let in—the secret knocking code that would enable him to get inside the house, which is the most important.

— The Brothers Karamazov

He had, to be sure, had good intentions; but as Shuichi and Kikuko had drifted apart and he had drawn closer to Kikuko, it had become more difficult for him to give her money as if in secret.

— The Sound of the Mountain

There was nothing definite, but Stepan Arkadyich was almost never at home, there was also almost never any money in the house, and Dolly was constantly tormented by suspicions of his unfaithfulness, which this time she tried to drive away, fearing the already familiar pain of jealously.

— Anna Karenina

‘Money’s not the point,’ said Molly.

— The Golden Notebook

And so rich people like to stress at every opportunity that money makes no difference to the value of a human being; and by this they mean to say that they too would amount to as much without money as they do now, and they are always hurt if someone misunderstands them.

— The Man Without Qualities

He writes in it: ‘I will beg everybody for the money and if they turn me down, I’ll kill father and take the envelope tied with a pink ribbon that he keeps under his mattress.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Rachel was so ecstatic about both that, without her being aware of it, her fingers for some time continued to clutch not only the money but his hand too.

— The Man Without Qualities

I went on a spree to use up what money I had left, and I went so wild that finally the new major was forced to reprimand me.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And changing the subject, hands in his pockets, he suggested to his mother:

“And now, to celebrate Giuseppe’s being here, how about some money for a pack of Nazionali?”

— History

Only James says it was to hinder Mr. Ladislaw from wanting to marry you for your money—just as if he ever would think of making you an offer.

— Middlemarch

Since he was, moreover, very polite, except when money was being discussed, he passed, and rightly so, for the most aristocratic of Verrières’ notables.

— The Red and the Black

He went on to suspect Bergotte, the painter, the Verdurins, pausing for a moment to admire once again the wisdom of society people in refusing to mix with those artistic circles in which such things were possible, perhaps even openly avowed as good jokes; but then he recalled the traits of honesty that were to be observed in those Bohemians and contrasted them with the life of expedients, often bordering on fraudulence, to which the want of money, the craving for luxury, the corrupting influence of their pleasures often drove members of the aristocracy.

— In Search of Lost Time

“He has stolen the money from my bedroom!”

— The Brothers Karamazov

I am by no means sure that your son, in his recklessness and ignorance—I will use no severer word—has not tried to raise money by holding out his future prospects, or even that some one may not have been foolish enough to supply him on so vague a presumption: there is plenty of such lax money-lending as of other folly in the world.

— Middlemarch

If only I had plenty of money!

— Journey to the End of the Night

I didn’t understand her at all then: I thought she wouldn’t come with me unless I had some money, that she would never accept me penniless.

— The Brothers Karamazov

The sound of our pens going refreshed us exceedingly, insomuch that I sometimes found it difficult to distinguish between this edifying business proceeding and actually paying the money.

— Great Expectations

Hence one denies their existence, just as the common man denies the existence of the air, insisting that it is mere emptiness; but it seems that precisely this is what lends life a certain spectral quality—the fact that everything that is denied reality, everything that is colourless, odourless, tasteless, imponderable and non-moral, like water, air, space, money and the passing of time, is in reality what is most important.

— The Man Without Qualities

Rastignac set his money on the table and took a seat, feeling an extraordinary heightened curiosity at the sudden change in this man who, having at first spoken about killing him, was now setting himself up as his protector.

— Père Goriot

But all I know about him is that he was a man who brought me some money that he owed me for a length of cloth I had sold him.

— The Decameron

‘Well, then, come along—no use to take truck and leave money.’

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
death

There is a reaper, Death yclept, by Almighty God employed.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

I wasn’t as big as death.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Like one who after a night of drunken revelry hies to his bed, still reeling, but with conscience yet pricking him, as the plunging of the Roman race-horse but so much the more strike his steel tags into him; as one who in that miserable plight still turns and turns in giddy anguish, praying God for annihilation until the fit be passed; and at last amid the whirl of woe he feels, a deep stupor steals over him, as over the man who bleeds to death, for conscience is the wound, and there’s naught to staunch it; so, after sore wrestlings in his berth, Jonah’s prodigy of ponderous misery drags him drowning down to sleep.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

But when a belief vanishes, there survives it—more and more vigorously so as to cloak the absence of the power, now lost to us, of imparting reality to new things—a fetishistic attachment to the old things which it did once animate, as if it was in them and not in ourselves that the divine spark resided, and as if our present incredulity had a contingent cause—the death of the gods.

— In Search of Lost Time

He alone knew he was going to his death.

— Zorba the Greek

And the intoxication, as I knew even then, was the recklessness of infinite possibility, of danger, the secret ugly frightening pulse of war itself, of the death that we all wanted, for each other and for ourselves.

— The Golden Notebook

He said it was death.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

But let my death come at the hand

Of one my wrong has injured.

— Metamorphoses

If you yell at her, one morning: ‘Good heavens! what’s happened to you?! Your nose has grown a foot long overnight!!’ she’ll rush to the mirror, scared to death.

— History

And a well, or an ice-house, it somehow proved to him, poor pagan; where, strange to say, for all the heat of his sweatings, he caught a terrible chill which lapsed into a fever; and at last, after some days’ suffering, laid him in his hammock, close to the very sill of the door of death.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Doubtless they were sordid; and for the majority, who are not lofty, there is no escape from sordidness but by being free from money-craving, with all its base hopes and temptations, its watching for death, its hinted requests, its horse-dealer’s desire to make bad work pass for good, its seeking for function which ought to be another’s, its compulsion often to long for Luck in the shape of a wide calamity.

— Middlemarch

The picture he finished on the day of his mother’s death—one that satisfied him—was the last thing he did.

— Sons and Lovers

Condemned to a deferred death, the only thing that really mattered was an enormous longing for sleep, all the rest was torture, even the time and effort it took to eat.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Death was certain, yet it would have been bad form to defend oneself and kill a Jacobin or two.

— The Red and the Black

When, seeing that my body is merely sickness and crime, age and death, shall I—free, fearless and blissful—retire into the forest?

— Zorba the Greek

From the accounts of his various suppliers, Frédéric realized that he’d soon have to pay bills amounting to about forty thousand francs, not including death duties, which would be over thirty-seven thousand, and as the money was in landed property, he wrote off to his solicitor in Le Havre telling him to dispose of part of it, to enable him to clear his debts and have some cash in hand.

— A Sentimental Education

I am certain that when death appears to him he will smile in death’s face.

— Season of Migration to the North

When you came to think of it, taking it bit by bit, it was a pretty muddled and dreary thing, after all, but still, there it was, his own track ran right across it, and looking back you could see it quite clearly, from birth on to death.

— The Man Without Qualities

Mr. Hawley, indeed, in the first instance, invited a select party, including the two physicians, with Mr. Toller and Mr. Wrench, expressly to hold a close discussion as to the probabilities of Raffles’ illness, reciting to them all the particulars which had been gathered from Mrs. Abel in connection with Lydgate’s certificate, that the death was due to delirium tremens: and the medical gentlemen, who all stood undisturbedly on the old paths in relation to this disease, declared that they could see nothing in these particulars which could be transformed into a positive ground of suspicion.

— Middlemarch

Exhausted then and dying, these few words

She forced herself to murmur: “By our vows

Of wedlock, by the gods of home and heaven,

By my deserts, if I have well deserved,

By my death’s cause, my own still-living love,

I beg you, I implore you, not to take

Zephyr to be your wife in place of me.”

— Metamorphoses

Little face, so wilful and brooding, your sacrifice will have enriched not my life but my death.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

His father Nicholas was a despot, but he died a natural death.

— The Man Without Qualities

——I would be picquetted to death, cried the corporal, as he concluded Susannah’s story, before I would suffer the woman to come to any harm,—’twas my fault, an’ please your honour,—not hers.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Once the city coroner’s verified the cause of death, he gets sewn into a shroud, and then he’ll be buried.

— Père Goriot

She runs round the table to Franz’s side, hurry, oh, what am I doing, he’ll shoot, death, the end of everything, you murderer, the world’s over, I don’t want to die, don’t want to lose my head, finished with everything.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

Kassem thought for a while, then said:

‘I won’t hide it from you that death threatens us.

— Children of Gebelawi

And as for small difficulties and worryings, prospects of sudden disaster, peril of life and limb; all these, and death itself, seem to him only sly, good-natured hits, and jolly punches in the side bestowed by the unseen and unaccountable old joker.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

That business about caste blinded them to the horror of condemning a man to death.

— The Red and the Black

(The father, Amphion, had already plunged

A dagger in his heart and by his death

Ended both life and grief.)

— Metamorphoses

Indeed, I could very well do with a little rest in this subdued, frightened-to-death rocking chair, before I drove to wherever the beast’s lair was — and then pulled the pistol’s foreskin back, and then enjoyed the orgasm of the crushed trigger: I was always a good little follower of the Viennese medicine man.

— Lolita

‘Mind the potatoes don’t roll away, or we’ll starve to death.’

— Children of Gebelawi

He may be starving to death, but hire him to work and he’ll do his best to muck it up, and then go and complain to the justice of the peace.

— Anna Karenina

Some of us will live to see the death of the last chief in the alley.

— Children of Gebelawi