love
money
death
love

Perhaps he could not love her.

— Sons and Lovers

In Christ’s expression there had to be pity, because there was in him the expression of love, unearthly peace, readiness for death and an awareness of the vanity of words.

— Anna Karenina

I want to tell you that they are capable of great love and that, when they fall in love with a woman, they will love her with an idealistic, spiritual love.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Love one another, fathers.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And while my love, incessantly waiting for the morrow to bring the avowal of Gilberte’s for me, destroyed, unravelled every evening the ill-done work of the day, in some shadowed part of my being an unknown seamstress refused to abandon the discarded threads, but collected and rearranged them, without any thought of pleasing me or of toiling for my happiness, in the different order which she gave to all her handiwork.

— In Search of Lost Time

I knew almost nothing of these women; the part of their lives which they conceded to me was narrowly confined between two half-opened doors; their love, of which they never ceased talking, seemed to me sometimes as light as one of their garlands; it was like a fashionable jewel, or a fragile and costly fillet, and I suspected them of putting on their passion with their necklaces and their rouge.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

Why these three young ladies had to speak French and English on alternate days; why at certain hours they took turns playing the piano, the sounds of which were heard in their brother’s rooms upstairs, where the students worked; why all these teachers of French literature, music, drawing and dancing came there; why at certain hours all three young ladies, with Mlle Linon, went in a carriage to Tverskoy Boulevard in their fur-lined satin coats—Dolly in a long one, Natalie in a three-quarter one, and Kitty in a quite short one, so that her shapely legs in tight-fitting red stockings were in full view; why they had to stroll along Tverskoy Boulevard accompanied by a footman with a gold cockade on his hat—all of this and much more that went on in their mysterious world he did not understand; but he knew that everything that went on there was beautiful, and he was in love precisely with the mysteriousness of it all.

— Anna Karenina

When I saw my wife again,

My heart was overcome and my resolve

To test her love and honour almost failed;

I hardly stopped myself confessing all,

Stopped myself kissing her as she deserved.

— Metamorphoses

I was still walking behind Mrs. Haze through the dining room when, beyond it, there came a sudden burst of greenery — ‘the piazza,’ sang out my leader, and then, without the least warning, a blue sea-wave swelled under my heart and, from a mat in a pool of sun, half-naked, kneeling, turning about on her knees, there was my Riviera love peering at me over dark glasses.

— Lolita

Anna obviously admired her beauty and youth, and before Kitty could recover she felt that she was not only under her influence but in love with her, as young girls are capable of being in love with older married ladies, Anna did not look like a society lady or the mother of an eight-year-old son, but in the litheness of her movements, the freshness and settled animation of her face, which broke through now as a smile, now as a glance, would have looked more like a twenty-year-old girl had it not been for the serious, sometimes sad expression of her eyes, which struck Kitty and drew her to Anna.

— Anna Karenina

So long as his chief love didn’t remain locked in his room, excluding him from his presence, for Blitz all was merriment.

— History

This story, translated into English terms, should be the nice suburban wife in love with a hopeless coffee-bar bum, who says he is going to write, and perhaps does, one day, but that isn’t the point.

— The Golden Notebook

For little Lo was aware of that glow of hers, and I would often catch her coulant un regard in the direction of some amiable male, some grease monkey, with a sinewy golden-brown forearm and watch-braceleted wrist, and hardly had I turned my back to go and buy this very Lo a lollipop, than I would hear her and the fair mechanic burst into a perfect love song of wisecracks.

— Lolita

Even allowing that she was pretty—which she wasn’t—how could she possibly have interested him even for one minute when he was in love with somebody else?

— A Sentimental Education

How the look of my dear love’s name even affixed to some old hag of an actress, still makes me rock with helpless pain!

— Lolita

And now, when he had come to know her, to love her as he ought to have loved her, he had been humiliated before her and had lost her for ever, leaving her with nothing but a disgraceful memory of himself.

— Anna Karenina

She always thinks I don’t love her enough.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Far into the night, Miss Havisham’s words, ‘Love her, love her, love her!’ sounded in my ears.

— Great Expectations

Don’t ye love sperm?

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

And of all people it was with him alone that Vronsky would have liked to talk about his love.

— Anna Karenina

And there was one additional factor in the case of the cultivated persons, if they did not dedicate themselves to love as exclusively as Bonadea did: they no longer had the boon of credit and had not acquired the gift of deceit.

— The Man Without Qualities

A wave of hot love went over her to the infant.

— Sons and Lovers

She had all the loveliness and freshness of youth, yet she was not a child, and if she loved him, she loved him consciously, as a woman should love: that was one thing.

— Anna Karenina

At such moments everything adds to your loathsome distress, forcing you in your weakened state to see things, people, and the future as they are, that is, as skeletons, as nothings, which you will nevertheless have to love, cherish, and defend as if they existed.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Naked and hot with love; boiling with desire; stroking my trembling breasts and arms.

— Pedro Páramo

Even in her happiest moments, Mme. de Rênal always doubted that my love was as great as hers.

— The Red and the Black

I no longer love you, sir; my wild imagination played me false.

— The Red and the Black

Ah! how I’d love to tell him off!

— The Red and the Black

The same Kitty that Vronsky was in love with,’ thought Anna, ‘the one he remembered with love.

— Anna Karenina

Ulrich, however, was by that time so far gone in love that he no longer had any wish except to get as quickly and as far away as possible from the proximity of the origin of that love.

— The Man Without Qualities

The end of her keen suffering, daughter of suspicion, a present happiness of which she had never dreamed, sent her into raptures of love and wild gaiety.

— The Red and the Black

I want to tell you that they are capable of great love and that, when they fall in love with a woman, they will love her with an idealistic, spiritual love.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Supposedly, they were singing about some little setback in love.

— Journey to the End of the Night
money

Because if he hadn’t trampled on the money but had taken it, one hour later, at home, he would have wept bitterly at this new humiliation.

— The Brothers Karamazov

In his youth he had often enjoyed this sight, at that time when he still stood gazing into life’s shop-window, lacking the money to walk inside, and at the most could ponder on what his destiny might later bring him.

— The Man Without Qualities

Understandably enough, he felt that whatever negligible sums of money the natives called their own should remain available to the tax collector.

— Journey to the End of the Night

The trench-diggers of the legion were aided in their task by native crews; the building of the wall was for many of these mountain dwellers, so newly subdued, the first irrefutable proof of the protective power of Rome; their pay was the first Roman money to pass through their hands.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

“I’d rather be condemned as a thief and a murderer before my victim and before all other men, and be sent to Siberia,” he thought that night, “than give Katya the right to say that, after having betrayed her, I stole her money and used it to run away with Grushenka and start a new, ‘virtuous’ life with her.

— The Brothers Karamazov

To cut short these panegyrics, Frédéric handed over the money for the three tickets.

— A Sentimental Education

And finally, the doctor said, the accused, who became almost frantic at the mention of the three thousand, was, according to all the witnesses, a man very little interested in money matters and anything but avaricious.

— The Brothers Karamazov

I couldn’t run away if I didn’t have any money.

— The Sound of the Mountain

And that money-winning business is really a blot.

— Middlemarch

‘You know he has nothing to recommend him but money, and a ridiculous roll of addle-headed predecessors; now, don’t you?’

— Great Expectations

Of course, the straight, simple, formless account would not have been a ‘novel,’ and would not have got published, but I was genuinely not interested in ‘being a writer’ or even in making money.

— The Golden Notebook

Besides, the accused accounted clearly and without equivocation for the origin of that money, and his explanation, I submit, is very much in keeping with the accused’s personality and character.

— The Brothers Karamazov

He said the reason he finally left his job in Hollywood was because there wasn’t anybody left in it who was capable of believing that a writer would refuse money rather than have a bad film made.

— The Golden Notebook

But the prosecutor categorically rejects the possibility that the accused could, on that day, have set aside half the money and sewn it up in a rag, because, he says, ‘This is not the sort of man Karamazov is, and he cannot possibly feel that way about things.’

— The Brothers Karamazov

They ignore it and then use their dishonestly earned money to buy off the former contempt.

— Anna Karenina

Give me back everything that’s mine and I’ll go away … I have money to live on …

— Journey to the End of the Night

Many people in town and throughout the district started borrowing money from him, on good security, of course.

— The Brothers Karamazov

No, cowardly as that man may have been, once he had conceived such a plan, he would never have said a word to anyone, at least about the envelope with the money in it and the knocking signals, because that was tantamount to betraying himself.

— The Brothers Karamazov

They’ve got an old woman in view, they watched her collect money from the bank.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

Miss Havisham, if you could spare the money to do my friend Herbert a lasting service in life, but which from the nature of the case must be done without his knowledge, I could show you how.

— Great Expectations

In the first place, I never lend money, because lending money to people means quarreling with them.

— The Brothers Karamazov

I am very uncomfortable with my money, because they tell me I have too little for any great scheme of the sort I like best, and yet I have too much.

— Middlemarch

You put your money on the table.

— The Brothers Karamazov

He was fed up with the baroness, especially since she kept wanting to give him money; but there was one, he would show her to Vronsky, a wonder, a delight, in the severe Levantine style, the ‘slave-girl Rebecca genre, you know’.

— Anna Karenina

Incapable of resisting any impulse, she’d fall for some knick-knack she’d seen, lose sleep over it, dash out and buy it, and then swap it for something similar; she’d botch up her dress materials, lose her jewellery, squander her money, and give the dress off her back for a stage-box.

— A Sentimental Education

She saw them, helped them, got involved, and now the whole family’s on her hands; and not patronizingly, not with money, but she herself is helping the boys with Russian in preparation for school, and she’s taken the girl to live with her.

— Anna Karenina

So you see that what I should most rejoice at would be to have something good to do with my money: I should like it to make other people’s lives better to them.

— Middlemarch

But Soliman boldly summoned a cab; he had recently got into the way of having a great deal of money, since Arnheim was often very absent-minded.

— The Man Without Qualities

And it was only yesterday, on my way to Perkhotin’s, that I decided to tear the money from around my neck.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And then Tom he talked along, and talked along, and says, le’s all three slide out of here, one of these nights, and get an outfit, and go for howling adventures amongst the Injuns, over in the Territory for a couple of weeks or two; and I says, all right, that suits me, but I ain’t got no money for to buy the outfit, and I reckon I couldn’t get none from home, because it’s likely pap’s been back before now, and got it all away from Judge Thatcher and drunk it up.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

You thought: ‘He’ll kill me and steal my money and bury me in the desert just as I did with the man I killed.”’

— Children of Gebelawi

She started to tell the story, and she told everything, the whole story that Mitya had told Alyosha, including her deep gratitude and her “prostration” before him; in explaining why she had needed the money, she told of her father’s troubles and of her going to Mitya’s lodgings…

— The Brothers Karamazov

On the other hand, although the man of today possesses in money, as Arnheim realised, the surest modern method of managing all relationships, yet in spite of the fact that this method can be as hard and accurate as a guillotine, it can also be as touchily sensitive as a sufferer from rheumatism—one need only think of the aching and limping of the money-market at the slightest cause—and is most delicately bound up with everything over which it rules.

— The Man Without Qualities
death

I once heard a prince, a very great captain, maintain that a soldier could not be condemned to death for faintheartedness; he had just been told the story at table of the trial of the seigneur de Vervins, who was condemned to death for having surrendered Boulogne.

— Essays

For months now, to tell the truth, the streets had been papered with proclamations printed on pink paper, which ordered all ablebodied men to present themselves for obligatory labor under pain of death; bot nobody obeyed, nobody heeded those edicts, by now they didn’t even read them any more.

— History

Should Providence in this case award death, there was no sin in contemplating death as the desirable issue—if he kept his hands from hastening it—if he scrupulously did what was prescribed.

— Middlemarch

In this way of life we shall continue until such time as we discover (provided we are spared from early death) the end decreed by Heaven for these terrible events.

— The Decameron

That death would be in vain if I lacked the courage to look straight at it, keeping in mind those qualities of cold and silence, of coagulated blood and inert members which men cover up so quickly with earth, and with hypocrisy; I chose to grope my way in the dark without recourse to such weak lamps.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

They have pointed out that the orderly Phoedimus, who hated me, and whose silence could not have been bought by my friends, very opportunely died of a malignant fever the day after the death of his master.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

“In our way thither,” he says, “about four o’clock in the morning, when we were about one hundred and fifty leagues from the Main of America, our ship felt a terrible shock, which put our men in such consternation that they could hardly tell where they were or what to think; but every one began to prepare for death.”

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Theoretically this means that the family without a roof over its head, if it has not frozen to death in an icy winter’s night, will be just as happy, when it sees the first rays of the morning sun, as the rich man who has to get out of his warm bed; and in practice what it comes to is that every person bears the burden with which he has been loaded as patiently as a donkey, for a donkey that is only just a little bit stronger than the weight of its burden demands of it is happy.

— The Man Without Qualities

And the truth is he’s taking Madame Meursault’s death very hard.

— The Stranger

It was extremely impersonal; it said something about death; it said very little about love.

— To the Lighthouse

Of such a letter, Death himself might well have been the post-boy.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Death is nothing—just pff! and the candle is snuffed out.

— Zorba the Greek

None of my friends referred to the incidents of those few days which had preceded the emperor’s death.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

That when once a vile name was wrongfully or injudiciously given, ’twas not like the case of a man’s character, which, when wrong’d, might hereafter be clear’d;——and, possibly, sometime or other, if not in the man’s life, as least after his death,—be, somehow or other, set to rights with the world: But the injury of this, he would say, could never be undone;- – – nay, he doubted even whether and act of parliament could reach it:——He knew as well as you, that the legislature assum’d a power over surnames;—but for very strong reasons, which he could give, it had never yet adventured, he would say, to go a step further.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

You and I on the Bowery together, together until death-do-us-part, love until death.

— The Golden Notebook

And the conviction that, after his death, Zosima would confer great glory on the monastery was, perhaps, stronger in Alyosha than in anyone else at the monastery.

— The Brothers Karamazov

He met his death alone.

— Pedro Páramo

Even here there might be a mistake: human prescriptions were fallible things: Lydgate had said that treatment had hastened death, why not his own method of treatment?

— Middlemarch

But let my death come at the hand

Of one my wrong has injured.

— Metamorphoses

Doctor Slop, like a son of a w——, as my father called him for it,—to exalt himself,—debased me to death,—and made ten thousand times more of Susannah’s accident, than there was any grounds for; so that in a week’s time, or less, it was in every body’s mouth, That poor Master Shandy * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * entirely.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

One man complains of its ease:

Death, would that you scorned to take the coward’s life, 

And came only to valor!

— Essays

Similarly, in the case of the poor kitchen-maid, was not one’s attention incessantly drawn to her belly by the weight which dragged it down; and in the same way, again, are not the thoughts of the dying often turned towards the practical, painful, obscure, visceral aspect, towards that “seamy side” of death which is, as it happens, the side that death actually presents to them and forces them to feel, and which far more closely resembles a crushing burden, a difficulty in breathing, a destroying thirst, than the abstract idea to which we are accustomed to give the name of Death?

— In Search of Lost Time

The terrible thing in this sort of grief is that, unlike anything else — a loss, a death — one cannot simply bear one’s cross.

— Anna Karenina

These feeble defences raised by man against death were developed along two lines: the first consisted in presenting death to us as an inevitable evil, and in reminding us that neither beauty, youth, nor love escapes decay; life and its train of ills are thus proved even more horrible than death itself, and it is better, accordingly, to die than to grow old.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

When he woke up, instead of the news of his brother’s death that he had expected, he learned that the sick man had reverted to his earlier condition.

— Anna Karenina

When Kitty had gone and Levin was left alone, he felt such anxiety without her and such an impatient desire to live quickly, the more quickly, till tomorrow morning, when he would see her again and be united with her for ever, that he became afraid, as of death, of those fourteen hours that he had to spend without her.

— Anna Karenina

Let us try, if we can, to enter into death with open eyes…

— Memoirs of Hadrian

‘And you know, there’s less charm in life when you think about death — but it’s more peaceful.’

— Anna Karenina

There were the eternal problems: suffering; death; the poor.

— To the Lighthouse

And on top of it all, the death of these same children.

— Anna Karenina

How many low-born people do we see led to death—and not a simple death, but mingled with shame and sometimes with grievous torments—bringing to it such assurance, some through stubbornness, others through natural simplicity, that we see no change from their ordinary manner: settling their domestic affairs, commending themselves to theirs friends, singing, preaching, and keeping up a conversation with the people; sometimes even joking and drinking to their friends, yielding in nothing to Socrates.

— Essays

Cattle breeder was attacked by a bull on his farm and gored to death.

— Season of Migration to the North

For the space of a second I felt my heart-beats quicken, then slow down, falter, and cease; I seemed to fall like a stone into some black well which is doubtless death.

— Memoirs of Hadrian