love
money
death
love

That I was in love with a man who cared nothing for me, and that I’m dying of love for him?

— Anna Karenina

Three Love Problems.

— Middlemarch

And yet, when he again made love to her, she again thought: Yes, it’s right, because we’ve been so close together all evening.

— The Golden Notebook

He lived in this one room until the widow of an airforce pilot fell in love with him and transferred him to her flat, where he had two rooms.

— The Golden Notebook

Here were the sun and the gebel and the sands, majesty and love and death, and a heart in which love was dawning.

— Children of Gebelawi

Analysing it and comparing it with the former ones, she saw clearly that she would not have been in love with Komisarov if he had not saved the emperor’s life, would not have been in love with Ristich-Kudzhitsky if there had been no Slavic question, but that she loved Karenin for himself, for his lofty, misunderstood soul, the high sound of his voice, so dear to her, with its drawn-out intonations, his weary gaze, his character, and his soft white hands with their swollen veins.

— Anna Karenina

She deludes herself about the nature of the man; for him, another love affair merely.

— The Golden Notebook

“My love—my love—Oh my love!” he whispered again and again.

— Sons and Lovers

‘Locked up love letters.’

— Lolita

It’s a hard violent sex, like nothing I’ve known before, nothing (*16) to do with the creature who is the woman-in-love.

— The Golden Notebook

‘At this rate,’ she thought, ‘there will always be something fresh about him to love; so our marriage just can’t go stale.’

— Midnight's Children

I was in love with a man, and I used to sing that piece for him.

— Anna Karenina

Love may be the most intense joy on earth.

— Zorba the Greek

It doesn’t mean, not being in love, or not being in sympathy, or not being patient, or being ignorant.

— The Golden Notebook

Throwing yourself headlong into your work, into wine, and love, and never being afraid of either God or devil … that’s what youth is!

— Zorba the Greek

Every evening she came back to her love jazz …

— Journey to the End of the Night

His love touched his wife’s heart—

How different from his!—and she recalled

Her own deserted father far away.

— Metamorphoses

He protested: his love was innocent.

— A Sentimental Education

Now as widow Wadman did love my uncle Toby——and my uncle Toby did not love widow Wadman, there was nothing for Wadman to do, but to go on and love my uncle Toby——or let it alone.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

In this way the difficulty that at the age of twenty-one one is not supposed to behave like a child is swept away, for this fight continues from birth until old age and is only ended when the world of bourgeois values has been destroyed by the world of love.

— The Man Without Qualities

They are tied by the closest of all bonds, neurotic pain-giving; the experience of pain dealt and received; pain as an aspect of love; apprehended as a knowledge of what the world is, what growth is.

— The Golden Notebook

Tell your wife that I love her as before, and if she cannot forgive me my situation, I wish her never to forgive me.

— Anna Karenina

The idea of loving one’s neighbor is possible only as an abstraction: it may be conceivable to love one’s fellow man at a distance, but it is almost never possible to love him at close quarters.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Paris had never seemed so lovely and in the future, he could see nothing but an endless procession of years brimming over with love.

— A Sentimental Education

I remember lying there and hating him and wondering why the only time I could remember him making love to me with any conviction was when he knew I had just made love to someone else.

— The Golden Notebook

Without quite knowing why, my grandmother found in the steeple of Saint-Hilaire that absence of vulgarity, pretension, and niggardliness which made her love, and deem rich in beneficent influences, nature itself—when the hand of man had not, as did my great-aunt’s gardener, trimmed it—and the works of genius.

— In Search of Lost Time

Then she could love him.

— Sons and Lovers

If she ever fell in love with him, she would say so at once.

— The Man Without Qualities

‘I’ll tell you,’ said she, in the same hurried passionate whisper, ‘what real love is.

— Great Expectations

Although I’m a carpenter like father, I love stories.

— Children of Gebelawi

I have elected to love none but magnanimous souls, and to live only in an atmosphere of magnanimity.

— In Search of Lost Time

You love me, you are devoted to me, and I have no need of making pretty speeches to please you.

— The Red and the Black

He was collectively in love with them.

— The Golden Notebook
money

I know, by a word you let fall one day, that you don’t like my playing at cards so much for money.

— Middlemarch

After this he led a wild, gay life that cost a good deal of money.

— The Brothers Karamazov

He ate two samosas, spending too much money; his mother would be hurt but he’d had a fine time.

— Midnight's Children

She could, of course, get quite a lot of money out of your father, but then he wouldn’t marry her and eventually he’s likely to turn tight-fisted and hide his purse away.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Having provided him with some very old clothes and filled his purse with money, she then explained which road he must take on entering the fortress in order to find his servant, and finally she let him out by the postern through which he had entered, imploring him to keep their encounter a secret.

— The Decameron

To start with, the implication is that, yesterday, Smerdyakov, seized by remorse, returned the money he had stolen and then hanged himself, because, of course, if he had not been remorseful he would not have returned the money.

— The Brothers Karamazov

He had scorned even to form conjectures about Mr. Vincy’s intentions on money matters, and nothing but extremity could have induced him to apply to his father-in-law, even if he had not been made aware in various indirect ways since his marriage that Mr. Vincy’s own affairs were not flourishing, and that the expectation of help from him would be resented.

— Middlemarch

But Fred gives me his honor that he has never borrowed money on the pretence of any understanding about his uncle’s land.

— Middlemarch

‘Try again: for one thing, Anna Wulf wrote a novel which was praised by the critics and did so well she is still in fact living on the money it earned.’

— The Golden Notebook

The trench-diggers of the legion were aided in their task by native crews; the building of the wall was for many of these mountain dwellers, so newly subdued, the first irrefutable proof of the protective power of Rome; their pay was the first Roman money to pass through their hands.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

But he didn’t love money for its own sake.

— Dead Souls

Probably he killed in an outburst of rage, his passion inflamed at the mere sight of the face of his hated rival, but after killing him—which he may have done with a single powerful blow of the pestle—and after convincing himself that she was not there, he still did not forget to thrust his hand under the pillow, pull out the envelope with the money in it, and tear it open.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Those things never required any money at all, anyway.

— The Brothers Karamazov

We spent as much money as we could, and got as little for it as people could make up their minds to give us.

— Great Expectations

I am very uncomfortable with my money, because they tell me I have too little for any great scheme of the sort I like best, and yet I have too much.

— Middlemarch

They ignore it and then use their dishonestly earned money to buy off the former contempt.

— Anna Karenina

Whether rich or poor, they never have enough money for life’s necessities, though they can always find enough for any whim that strikes them.

— Père Goriot

Exclusive of the original purchase-money, which was eight hundred pounds—it had cost the family eight hundred pounds more in a law-suit about fifteen years before—besides the Lord knows what trouble and vexation.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

And what made you decide to take that money yesterday?

— The Brothers Karamazov

Where then had Peter meant the rest of the money to go—and where the land?

— Middlemarch

You’ll flirt with some pretty woman and she’ll fit you money.

— Père Goriot

Because if he hadn’t trampled on the money but had taken it, one hour later, at home, he would have wept bitterly at this new humiliation.

— The Brothers Karamazov

There’s only one kind of freedom, only one, to see properly and have your pockets full of money.

— Journey to the End of the Night

“Listen, Alexei Karamazov, isn’t there in all this analysis of ours—I mean yours, no, better say ours—isn’t there a certain contempt for that unhappy man, just in the way we allow ourselves to examine his soul as if from somewhere high above, in our deciding that now he can’t fail to accept the money?”

— The Brothers Karamazov

And he left almost ten thousand rubles here too, the money the prosecutor, having somehow found out that Ivan had sent somebody to cash it for him, mentioned in his speech.

— The Brothers Karamazov

It is one of those cases on which a man is condemned on the ground of his character—it is believed that he has committed a crime in some undefined way, because he had the motive for doing it; and Bulstrode’s character has enveloped me, because I took his money.

— Middlemarch

“Money is virtue!”

— Père Goriot

Since Shuichi had gone to Kinu for the medical expenses, it did not seem that either he or Kikuko had money for presents.

— The Sound of the Mountain

The young woman call’d the old man and his wife into the room, to shew them the money, in order to gain me credit for a bed and what little necessaries I should want, till I should be in a condition to be got to the hospital——Come then! said she, tying up the little purse—I’ll be your banker—but as that office alone will not keep me employ’d, I’ll be your nurse too.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

I’d shower you with money if only I was able to, Kassem.

— Children of Gebelawi

To a question about Chichikov being a counterfeiter, Nozdrev said that he was indeed, and told a story which attested to Chichikov’s extraordinary agility—once when it was discovered that two million in forged paper money was hidden in Chichikov’s house, the house was cordoned off and two soldiers were stationed at each door.

— Dead Souls

Oh, all that, of course, made me feel wretched, but not as terrible as the horrible realization that I had spent the money and was, therefore, now irredeemably a thief!

— The Brothers Karamazov

The religion of the flag promptly replaced the cult of heaven, an old cloud which had already been deflated by the Reformation and reduced to a network of episcopal money boxes.

— Journey to the End of the Night
death

How wonderful Gebel’s quarter will be after the death of Zonfol!

— Children of Gebelawi

I repeated to myself Virgil’s lines devoted to the nephew of Augustus, likewise designated to rule, and whom death stopped short on the way.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

The Danaids who dared to do to death

Their cousin-husbands carry endlessly

The water that their sieves can never hold.

— Metamorphoses

Nevertheless there have occurred instances, well authenticated ones too, where the captain has been known for an uncommonly critical moment or two, in a sudden squall say—to seize hold of the nearest oarsman’s hair, and hold on there like grim death.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

It was important that the victim should not struggle, and that the death should appear voluntary.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

——The sun was set—they had done their work; the nymphs had tied up their hair afresh—and the swains were preparing for a carousal——My mule made a dead point——’Tis the fife and tabourin, said I——I’m frighten’d to death, quoth he——They are running at the ring of pleasure, said I, giving him a prick——By saint Boogar, and all the saints at the backside of the door of purgatory, said he—(making the same resolution with the abbesse of Andoüillets) I’ll not go a step further——’Tis very well, sir, said I—I never will argue a point with one of your family, as long as I live; so leaping off his back, and kicking off one boot into this ditch, and t’other into that—I’ll take a dance, said I——so stay you here.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

But after what you have said, it is my duty to tell you that death from this disease is often sudden.

— Middlemarch

Death seems the only desirable sequel for a career like this; but Death is only a launching into the region of the strange Untried; it is but the first salutation to the possibilities of the immense Remote, the Wild, the Watery, the Unshored; therefore, to the death-longing eyes of such men, who still have left in them some interior compunctions against suicide, does the all-contributed and all-receptive ocean alluringly spread forth his whole plain of unimaginable, taking terrors, and wonderful, new-life adventures; and from the hearts of infinite Pacifics, the thousand mermaids sing to them—“Come hither, broken-hearted; here is another life without the guilt of intermediate death; here are wonders supernatural, without dying for them.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

In death, his body seemed even smaller and skinnier than in life, and his face, even though swollen from torture, had taken on the characteristic look of the neighborhood granddad, because of his sharp chin that almost touched his nose.

— History

Always alone, his soul oscillated, first on the side of death, then on the side of life, doggedly.

— Sons and Lovers

My grandfather pointed out to my father in what respects the appearance of the place was still the same, and how far it had altered since the walk that he had taken with old M. Swann on the day of his wife’s death; and he seized the opportunity to tell us once again the story of that walk.

— In Search of Lost Time

If you yell at her, one morning: ‘Good heavens! what’s happened to you?! Your nose has grown a foot long overnight!!’ she’ll rush to the mirror, scared to death.

— History

Not one was seen so beaten down with wounds as not to try even in his last gasp to avenge himself, and with the weapons of despair to assuage his death in the death of some enemy.

— Essays

She was near death, and I would have promised her anything.

— Pedro Páramo

He did not hear until later of Kitamoto’s death, which occurred during the air raids; and when Tanizaki Eiko came with her introduction, Kitamoto’s wife and children were still in Gifu Prefecture, where they had taken refuge from the raids.

— The Sound of the Mountain

His death was a battle lost for our side.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

It’s like keeping a man condemned to death for months with a noose around his neck, promising him maybe death, maybe mercy.

— Anna Karenina

Death seems the only desirable sequel for a career like this; but Death is only a launching into the region of the strange Untried; it is but the first salutation to the possibilities of the immense Remote, the Wild, the Watery, the Unshored; therefore, to the death-longing eyes of such men, who still have left in them some interior compunctions against suicide, does the all-contributed and all-receptive ocean alluringly spread forth his whole plain of unimaginable, taking terrors, and wonderful, new-life adventures; and from the hearts of infinite Pacifics, the thousand mermaids sing to them—“Come hither, broken-hearted; here is another life without the guilt of intermediate death; here are wonders supernatural, without dying for them.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Ser Cepperello deceives a holy friar with a false confession, then he dies; and although in life he was a most wicked man, in death he is reputed to be a Saint, and is called Saint Ciappelletto. 

— The Decameron

Levin would have liked to talk with them, to hear what they said to their father, but Natalie turned to him, and just then Lvov’s colleague, Makhotin, in a court uniform, came into the room to fetch him, so that they could go together to meet someone, and now an endless conversation started about Herzegovina, Princess Korzinsky, the duma, and the unexpected death of Mme Apraksin.

— Anna Karenina

This is the speech—I learned it, easy enough, while he was learning it to the king:

To be, or not to be; that is the bare bodkin

That makes calamity of so long life;

For who would fardels bear, till Birnam Wood do come to Dunsinane,

But that the fear of something after death

Murders the innocent sleep,

Great nature’s second course,

And makes us rather sling the arrows of outrageous fortune

Than fly to others that we know not of.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Nora, with her death, had eluded by a few months the Italian racial decrees, which now stigmatized her irremediably as a Jew.

— History

There is an exhaustion that is like living death.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

For fear of death he had put himself under the Trustee’s protection and lost everything; and yet death had come—death, which destroyed life with fear even before it struck.

— Children of Gebelawi

“Cowd as death!”

— Sons and Lovers

These feeble defences raised by man against death were developed along two lines: the first consisted in presenting death to us as an inevitable evil, and in reminding us that neither beauty, youth, nor love escapes decay; life and its train of ills are thus proved even more horrible than death itself, and it is better, accordingly, to die than to grow old.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

The shame and disgrace of Alexei Alexandrovich and of Seryozha, and my own terrible shame — death will save it all.

— Anna Karenina

She was worried that he might starve to death.

— The Red and the Black

“A dog’s death for a dog!”

— The Brothers Karamazov

Cheering and shouting, marching by sixes and twos and threes, marches the French Revolution, marches the Russian Revolution, march the Peasant Wars, the Anabaptists, they all fall into line behind Death, there is cheering in their wake, they are headed for freedom, the old world must fall, wake up, the dawn air, widdeboom widdeboom, in sixes, in twos, in threes, brothers, to the sun, to freedom, brothers to the light, in stride and left, right, left, right, widdeboom widdeboom.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

The deceased often talked about you, she says, and left instructions that a santuri of his should be given to you after his death to help you to remember him.

— Zorba the Greek

However, if we are to believe a Church Father, Death is not an evil, unless that which follows it is.

— Essays

No man should be called happy till his death;

Always we must await his final day, 

Reserving judgment till he’s laid away.

— Essays