love
money
death
love

I was still walking behind Mrs. Haze through the dining room when, beyond it, there came a sudden burst of greenery — ‘the piazza,’ sang out my leader, and then, without the least warning, a blue sea-wave swelled under my heart and, from a mat in a pool of sun, half-naked, kneeling, turning about on her knees, there was my Riviera love peering at me over dark glasses.

— Lolita

Rastignac made up his mind to seek his fortune by digging two trenches at the same time, building dream castles both on his studies and on love, becoming a learned man but also a man of the world.

— Père Goriot

‘Well,’ she went on with zest, ‘as for me, I do smoke, and, as dear Dr. Pierce used to say: I’m not proud of it but I jeest love it.’

— Lolita

And so it was that in those last years before the Great War carried this to its foregone conclusion there had also been much talk, among the younger generation, of love and a sense of fellowship.

— The Man Without Qualities

If you knew how painful it is for me, and what I would have given to be able to love you freely and boldly!

— Anna Karenina

“I have the good luck to be in love,” she told herself one day in a rapture of incredible joy.

— The Red and the Black

Doesn’t it always go bad when a war widow falls in love?

— The Sound of the Mountain

If just once in my life a woman would take one look at me and fall in love, but they never do.

— The Golden Notebook

‘You think he’s unable to fall in love,’ said Kitty, translating it into her own language.

— Anna Karenina

The idea of loving one’s neighbor is possible only as an abstraction: it may be conceivable to love one’s fellow man at a distance, but it is almost never possible to love him at close quarters.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And don’t I love him now?

— Anna Karenina

As I wept I saw his prick stand up under his jeans, and I got wet, and I thought, derisive, oh so now he’s going to love me, he’s going to love poor betrayed Anna and her wounded white bosom.

— The Golden Notebook

“It’s you I love, you alone, and when I’m in Siberia, I’ll love only you.”

— The Brothers Karamazov

She would try to relieve the pain of love by first roughly rubbing her dry lips against mine; then my darling would draw away with a nervous toss of her hair, and then again come darkly near and let me feed on her open mouth, while with a generosity that was ready to offer her everything, my heart, my throat, my entrails, I gave her to hold in her awkward fist the scepter of my passion.

— Lolita

Now when she saw Narcissus wandering

In the green byways, Echo’s heart was fired;

And stealthily she followed, and the more

She followed him, the nearer flamed her love,

As when a torch is lit and from the tip

The leaping sulphur grasps the offered flame.

— Metamorphoses

Love was God’s gift.

— Sons and Lovers

She did not know where the things that Ulrich was talking about led to: she believed him because she was in love with him, and disbelieved him because she was ten years younger than he and belonged to another generation, one that felt itself to be fresh and energetic, and both these attitudes began to merge in the vaguest possible way while he went on talking.

— The Man Without Qualities

“I hope so–because if it were not, love might be a very terrible thing,” she said.

— Sons and Lovers

Ivan doesn’t love anyone, though; Ivan is not like us.

— The Brothers Karamazov

I love you and offer you my hand.

— Anna Karenina

“I love you,” she said to me, and I believed her.

— Season of Migration to the North

There you’ll find the place I love most in the world.

— Pedro Páramo

What could he say, since what had got obstinately uppermost in his mind was the passionate love for her which he forbade himself to utter?

— Middlemarch

And they like messages saying that murder is bad, cruelty is bad, and love is love is love is love.

— The Golden Notebook

And in his subsequent business travels, he had passed through Cosenza and met his first love there.

— History

Śakuntalā must leave today—

My sight grows dark with what may come,

My throat is choked, my heart contracts,

A hard ascetic cracked by love.

— The Recognition of Śakuntalā

But he had a chivalrous nature (was not the disinterested service of woman among the ideal glories of old chivalry?): his disregarded love had not turned to bitterness; its death had made sweet odors—floating memories that clung with a consecrating effect to Dorothea.

— Middlemarch

Mathilde is farsighted; she sensed right off that this suspicion could ruin him in my estimation; whence, her avowal that it was she who took it upon herself to fall in love with him first….

— The Red and the Black

You have my heart, and all the sympathy and love that are in it.

— Children of Gebelawi

“So you don’t love me anymore, and I adore you!” Julien, mad with love and grief, said to her one day, after a long walk.

— The Red and the Black

‘Why wouldn’t I sweetie, come here, love for a Sechser.’

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

I regretted keenly her mistake about my private aesthetics, for I simply love that tinge of Botticellian pink, that raw rose about the lips, those wet, matted eyelashes; and, naturally, her bashful whim deprived me of many opportunities of specious consolation.

— Lolita

And the joy with which I first bound myself apprentice, when Françoise returned to tell me that my letter would be delivered, Swann, too, had known well—that false joy which a friend or relative of the woman we love can give us, when, on his arrival, at the house or theatre where she is to be found, for some ball or party or “first night” at which he is to meet her, he sees us wandering outside, desperately awaiting some opportunity of communicating with her.

— In Search of Lost Time
money

Mr. Perkhotin informed us that when you came to see him you were holding a bundle of money in your hands … your bloodstained hands … a lot of money, bills of high denomination—a wad of hundred-ruble bills.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And would you believe it?—the poorer and humbler a Russian man of the people is, the greater is that true grandeur in him, for the better-off among them, the avaricious peasants and the money-lenders, have already become corrupted.

— The Brothers Karamazov

There were at that time in Kakania families whose houses were frequented by officers because their daughters married officers, and there were families whose daughters did not marry officers, either because there was no money to put down for the marriage-caution, or on principle, so that no officers frequented their houses.

— The Man Without Qualities

Because Lola swallowed quite a heap of my—that is to say, your money.

— Zorba the Greek

They had pots of money.

— The Brothers Karamazov

You won’t pay protection money to a tyrant or submit to a drunkard.

— Children of Gebelawi

But he, to whom nothing could have seemed more tedious hitherto than all that pertained to the cosmopolitan life of Baden or of Nice, having learned that Odette had perhaps one day led a gay life in those pleasure-cities, although he could never find out whether it had been solely to satisfy a need for money which, thanks to him, she no longer felt, or from some capricious instinct which might at any moment revive in her, now leaned in impotent, blind, dizzy anguish over the bottomless abyss in which those early years of MacMahon’s Presidency had been engulfed, years during which one spent the winter on the Promenade des Anglais, the summer beneath the limes of Baden, and he would find in them a painful but magnificent profundity, such as a poet might have lent them; indeed he would have devoted to the reconstruction of the petty details of social life on the Côte d’Azur in those days, if it could have helped him to understand something of Odette’s smile and the look in her eyes—candid and simple though they were—as much passion as the aesthete who ransacks the extant documents of fifteenth-century Florence in order to penetrate further into the soul of the Primavera, the fair Vanna or the Venus of Botticelli.

— In Search of Lost Time

And so he tore open the envelope, took out the money, and then tossed the torn envelope on the floor, because he was the master of the house and certainly did not have to worry about leaving clues.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And you could never have accused me in court, because if you had, I’d have told them everything—oh, not that I killed him and stole the money, that I certainly wouldn’t have told them—but that you had tried to incite me to kill and to rob and that I had refused.

— The Brothers Karamazov

But what are they going to do for money.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

So there’s nothing easier now than to make him accept the two hundred rubles no later than tomorrow, since he’s already proved to himself that he’s a man of honor by throwing away the money offered to him and trampling it underfoot.

— The Brothers Karamazov

My own money buys me nothing but an uneasy conscience.

— Middlemarch

According to this way of using things, the men richest in money are those who have charge of guarding the gates and walls of a good city.

— Essays

Who do I ask now, how am I going to go about it, given I don’t want to scrounge off of their money.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

If some villager had had the inspiration to ask him for money, he would have pulled out his bundle of bills immediately and proceeded to hand them out right and left without restraint.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Many people in town and throughout the district started borrowing money from him, on good security, of course.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Then he would take his father the money he had collected.

— Children of Gebelawi

As Francis the first of France was one winterly night warming himself over the embers of a wood fire, and talking with his first minister of sundry things for the good of the state—it would not be amiss, said the king, stirring up the embers with his cane, if this good understanding betwixt ourselves and Switzerland was a little strengthened—There is no end, Sire, replied the minister, in giving money to these people—they would swallow up the treasury of France—Poo! poo! answered the king——there are more ways, Mons. le Premier, of bribing states, besides that of giving money——I’ll pay Switzerland the honour of standing godfather for my next child—Your majesty, said the minister, in so doing, would have all the grammarians in Europe upon your back;—Switzerland, as a republick, being a female, can in no construction be godfather—She may be godmother, replied Francis, hastily—so announce my intentions by a courier to morrow morning.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

And so, having decided to commit the crime, he goes and reveals all the details about the money to another person—the accused—who, he knows, is extremely interested in that money, and he initiates him into every secret: where the money is hidden, what is written on the envelope, how to knock on the door to be let in—the secret knocking code that would enable him to get inside the house, which is the most important.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Oh, gentlemen, can’t you stop worrying about all these unimportant details—all these hows and whens and whys, and how was it I had to have so much money rather than so much and all that kind of ridiculous stuff.

— The Brothers Karamazov

But he did not have even enough money to pay for horses.

— The Brothers Karamazov

And what of our money?

— Journey to the End of the Night

We need money, lots of money, to restore the holy monastery….

— Zorba the Greek

I stole money from Katya, you know.

— The Brothers Karamazov

An’ what I say is, as I’ve lived upo’ your ground from my father and grandfather afore me, an’ hev dropped our money into’t, an’ me an’ my children might lie and rot on the ground for top-dressin’ as we can’t find the money to buy, if the King wasn’t to put a stop.

— Middlemarch

One can put money into bad investments, and then it perishes on the field of money’s honour.

— The Man Without Qualities

The money for two-thirds of the wood had already been run through, and he had taken from the merchant, after a discount of ten per cent, almost all the money for the final third.

— Anna Karenina

‘That bastard got money out of a patriot I introduced him to and he’s set up as a dealer in rosaries!’

— A Sentimental Education

And in his capacity as the accused’s ‘eye,’ Smerdyakov betrayed his master and told the accused of the existence of the envelope with the money in it and also of the knocking signals that would enable him to get into the house.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Very well! those good Congreganists of Besançon will do anything for money; if you go about it the right way, they will sell you my mortal remains…

— The Red and the Black

She became calculating, money-hoarding.

— The Brothers Karamazov

So far as self is concerned, I think it would be easier to give up power and money than to keep them.

— Middlemarch

I knew he needed money and I knew what he needed it for: it was to entice that creature to go away with him.

— The Brothers Karamazov
death

Witness, too, all human beings, how when herded together in the sheepfold of a theatre’s pit, they will, at the slightest alarm of fire, rush helter-skelter for the outlets, crowding, trampling, jamming, and remorselessly dashing each other to death.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Why did the thought of death, the after-life, seem so sweet and consoling?

— Sons and Lovers

Yet, at his death, they found that he had a hundred thousand rubles in hard cash.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Death is not to be parceled out as if it were a blessing.

— Pedro Páramo

Most likely because day and night they’re at grips with death.

— Zorba the Greek

“It must be a special sign from heaven then,” others chimed in eagerly, and their opinion was accepted unquestionably when they explained that even an ordinary sinner’s body does not usually start to decay until about twenty-four hours after death, whereas in this case it had started uncannily soon, and that was also against the laws of nature and therefore must be seen as the finger of God!

— The Brothers Karamazov

Within are shabby shelves, ranged round with old decanters, bottles, flasks; and in those jaws of swift destruction, like another cursed Jonah (by which name indeed they called him), bustles a little withered old man, who, for their money, dearly sells the sailors deliriums and death.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

‘Now, Karl, you know we’ll break every bone in your body, and let you starve to death, if that’s what you want.’

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

He makes me think of death.

— The Man Without Qualities

The forgery of paper money, the abduction of the governor’s daughter, the death of the public prosecutor he was supposed to have caused, the arrival of a new governor general—it all gave him a considerable fright.

— Dead Souls

No one knew the real reasons for his death, but they guessed that he had annoyed his master and that the latter had brought him to his inevitable fate.

— Children of Gebelawi

In fact, some time earlier, in absolute and universal secrecy, he had charged Remo, in the event of his death, to inform Signora Ida that the mattress already left her contained a surprise for her.

— History

He met his death alone.

— Pedro Páramo

A lucky draw might bring about a man’s elevation to the council of the magi or the imprisonment of his enemy (secret, or known by all to be so), or might allow him to find, in the peaceful dimness of his room, the woman who would begin to disturb him, or whom he had never hoped to see again; an unlucky draw: mutilation, dishonor of many kinds, death itself.

— Ficciones

This drama of death was on such a small scale that the pit, the ant-eater and the ant could have been accommodated comfortably on a small finger-nail—Maryrose’s pink little finger-nail for instance.

— The Golden Notebook

Then, as if he had become two persons, he heard inside himself his own voice, but joyful and clear, though distant, coming from some unknown place, shouting at him: Verily I say unto you: for this last thought you have had on the point of death, you shall be saved from hell!

— History

The leaping blade lodged in its owner’s throat,

Yet not a blow of power enough to cause

His death.

— Metamorphoses

Morel and his wife were gentle with each other for some time after the death of their son.

— Sons and Lovers

You lost her then, then when her death was sure,

Unless her death indeed is what you want

And mean my grief to ease your cruel heart.

— Metamorphoses

At all events, few of those who caught it ever recovered, and in most cases death occurred within three days from the appearance of the symptoms we have described, some people dying more rapidly than others, the majority without any fever or other complications.

— The Decameron

Now she was gone, and forever behind him was the gap in life, the tear in the veil, through which his life seemed to drift slowly, as if he were drawn towards death.

— Sons and Lovers

The prosecutor then rose and, very gravely and with what struck me as real emotion in his voice, his finger pointing at me, said slowly and distinctly, “Gentlemen of the jury, the day after his mother’s death, this man was out swimming, starting up a dubious liaison, and going to the movies, a comedy, for laughs.”

— The Stranger

It would be understood at the moment of death that the link between the dark need for death, and death, itself, had been the wild crazy fantasies of a beautiful life; and that the commonsense and the order had been (not as it had seemed earlier in the story) symptoms of sanity, but intimations of madness.

— The Golden Notebook

My mother lay alone amid the candles; her face pale, her white teeth barely visible between purple lips frozen by the livid cold of death.

— Pedro Páramo

It isn’t death, nor the dungeon, nor the damp air; it’s Mme. de Rênal’s absence that is getting me down.

— The Red and the Black

Will you tell me whether it is an unalterable law in this fishery, Mr. Flask, for an oarsman to break his own back pulling himself backforemost into death’s jaws?

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

May God be my witness,” Ivan shouted, raising his hand, “that, although I may have secretly wished my father’s death, I am nowhere near as guilty as you imagine and perhaps I didn’t really mean to maneuver you into doing it.

— The Brothers Karamazov

“Ivan,” Alyosha said, cold with fear but still hoping to bring Ivan to his senses, “how could he possibly have told you about Smerdyakov’s death before I came here, when no one else knew about it or could possibly have had time to find out about it?”

— The Brothers Karamazov

“In judging of that tempestuous wind called Euroclydon,” says an old writer—of whose works I posses the only copy extant—“it maketh a marvelous difference, whether thou lookest out at it from a glass window where the frost is all on the outside, or whether thou observest it from that sashless window, where the frost is on both sides, and of which the wight Death is the only glazier.”

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

“What is it?” she asked, feeling sick to death.

— Sons and Lovers

After the fear of death that had gripped her as she fled from the truck, she found herself again, worse than before, bewildered and cowardly like a pariah dog persecuted by the dogcatchers.

— History

She has had a poor opinion of the physicians since my father’s death.

— Middlemarch

A whole world was appearing before me, composed of compassion, renunciation and air: Buddha’s mansions, the women in the harem, the golden coach, the three fateful encounters—with the old man, with the sick man, with death; the flight, the ascetic life, the deliverance, the proclaiming of salvation.

— Zorba the Greek