love
money
death
love

I love German.

— Anna Karenina

But if, in uttering the words ‘So you’re in love with him?’, he himself had groaned quite unhumanly, that was perhaps because he had already become infected with Clarisse’s madness, and this somewhat frightened him.

— The Man Without Qualities

Slender lady, you should know

That same love which tortures you

Consumes me quite—

The sun, that merely dulls the lotus’ glow,

Engulfs the moon in azure light.

— The Recognition of Śakuntalā

And she was troubled by the fact that Ulrich was in favour of an intense life of feeling without any  ‘time off’, whereas Arnheim had said, ambiguously, that one should never wholly hate or wholly love. 

— The Man Without Qualities

“And what about your sticky little leaves and the graves that are so dear to you and the blue sky and the woman you love?” Alyosha said bitterly.

— The Brothers Karamazov

After the Age of Hatred, the Age of Love would begin!

— A Sentimental Education

Better Siberia than your love, Katya, for I love another woman, and I know that you got to know her only too well today, so I don’t expect you can ever forgive us.

— The Brothers Karamazov

His own love was at fault, not hers.

— Sons and Lovers

And for platonic love there can be no drama, because in such love everything is clear and pure, because …

— Anna Karenina

And just as love songs prepare boys and girls for love, so the ardent Florentine verses prepared Italian youths for the day of deliverance.

— Zorba the Greek

Thus true love is forced to pay for the less satisfactory sort.

— Père Goriot

But in prison he showed a strange love for children.

— The Brothers Karamazov

I love all this, perhaps because I have nothing else to love, and perhaps also because nothing is worth a human soul’s love, and so it’s all the same — should we feel the urge to give it — whether the recipient be the diminutive form of my inkstand or the vast indifference of the stars.

— The Book of Disquiet

But the little phrase, as soon as it struck his ear, had the power to liberate in him the space that was needed to contain it; the proportions of Swann’s soul were altered; a margin was left for an enjoyment that corresponded no more than his love for Odette to any external object and yet was not, like his enjoyment of that love, purely individual, but assumed for him a sort of reality superior to that of concrete things.

— In Search of Lost Time

And so I told her that I loved her, I was like a man desperately in love.

— The Golden Notebook

‘I’ll tell you,’ said she, in the same hurried passionate whisper, ‘what real love is.

— Great Expectations

I must say, that Russian, Korasoff’s friend, who was in love with the beautiful Richmond Quakeress, was a devil of a fellow in his day; he’s as tiresome as they come.

— The Red and the Black

Why do you have to make love, considering all the things that are happening?

— Journey to the End of the Night

Yet on the day when I went out there to stay that summer, it was as though that casual pause at my door had left some seed, some minute virulence in this cellar earth of mine quick not for love perhaps (I did not love him; how could I? I had never even heard his voice, had only Ellen’s word for it that there was such a person) and quick not for the spying which you will doubtless call it, which during the past six months between that New Year’s and that June gave substance to that shadow with a name emerging from Ellen’s vain and garrulous folly, that shape without even a face yet because I had not even seen the photograph then, reflected in the secret and bemused gaze of a young girl: because I who had learned nothing of love, not even parents’ love—that fond dear constant violation of privacy, that stultification of the burgeoning and incorrigible  I  which is the meed and due of all mammalian meat, became not mistress, not beloved, but more than even love; I became all polymath love’s androgynous advocate.

— Absalom, Absalom!

You don’t love those things with reason, with logic, you love them with your innards, with your belly, and that’s also how you love your own first youthful strength.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Now, however, his aching heart suddenly understood that his lady love had been concealing this new rival from him, had lied to him earlier that day, because the new rival was all too real for her, was not at all a fictional character or a figment of her imagination, but a man in whom she had invested all her hopes.

— The Brothers Karamazov

“I owe it to myself to succeed with this woman,” Julien’s petty vanity went on, “especially because it will allow me, if ever I make my fortune and someone should criticize me for having done such lowly work as tutoring, to imply that love brought me to such a pass.”

— The Red and the Black

“She’s guilty of falling in love with Monsieur Eugène de Rastignac, and plunging right on, the poor innocent child, without any awareness of where it’s leading her!”

— Père Goriot

Unfeigned concern and love could be seen on Anna’s face.

— Anna Karenina

Their song rose amidst the damp foliage and spoke entirely of love and passion.

— Zorba the Greek

Just as before, she could only try to keep him by her love and her attractiveness.

— Anna Karenina

Alyosha never felt the least surprise that all these people should love the elder, that they should prostrate themselves before him.

— The Brothers Karamazov

For at such times desire, or love, would revive in him a feeling of vanity from which he was now quite free in his everyday life (although it was doubtless this feeling which had originally prompted him towards the career as a man of fashion in which he had squandered his intellectual gifts on frivolous amusements and made use of his erudition in matters of art only to advise society ladies what pictures to buy and how to decorate their houses), which made him eager to shine, in the eyes of any unknown beauty he had fallen for, with an elegance which the name Swann did not in itself imply.

— In Search of Lost Time

How I love those big blue eyes from close up, and looking at me as they often do!

— The Red and the Black

Suddenly it’s too painful for me to play this game, and I say: ‘Well, anyway, I’ll love you to come this evening.

— The Golden Notebook

But I loved Joe—perhaps for no better reason in those early days than because the dear fellow let me love him—and, as to him, my inner self was not so easily composed.

— Great Expectations

She says, ‘Tell them to give Uncle Harvey and William my love and a kiss, and say I’ve run over the river to see Mr—Mr—what is the name of that rich family your uncle Peter used to think so much of?—I mean the one that—’

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Some time that night he remarked: ‘Odd isn’t it, it really is true that if you love a woman sleeping with another woman means nothing.’

— The Golden Notebook
money

Why do you keep stuffing your money into your side pocket?

— The Brothers Karamazov

So when the time came when I realised that to accomplish my design I should need first of all and above all things money in considerable quantities and in the quite immediate future, I remembered what he had read to us and I went to the West Indies.

— Absalom, Absalom!

But that is precisely what nobody can assert of history, unless he happens to have written it down at the time, as the newspapers do, or unless it is a matter of professional or pecuniary affairs, for it is naturally important to know in how many years one will be entitled to a pension or when one will possess a certain sum of money or have spent it; and in such a context even wars can become memorable affairs.

— The Man Without Qualities

However, Casaubon has money enough; I must do him that justice.

— Middlemarch

“Came back home and found his chances of descendants gone where his children had attended to that, and his plantation ruined, fields fallow except for a fine stand of weeds, and taxes and levies and penalties sowed by United States marshals and such and all his niggers gone where the Yankees had attended to that, and you would have thought he would have been satisfied: yet before his foot was out of the stirrup he not only set out to try to restore his plantation to what it used to be, like maybe he was hoping to fool the Creditor by illusion and obfuscation by concealing behind the fact that time and change had not elapsed and occurred the fact that he was now almost sixty years old until he could get himself a new batch of children to bulwark him, but chose for this purpose the last woman on earth he might have hoped to prevail on, this Aunt R–all right all right all right.–that hated him, that had always hated him, yet choosing her with a kind of outrageous bravado as if a kind of despairing conviction of his irresistibility or invulnerability were a part of the price he had got for whatever it was he had sold the Creditor since according to the old dame he never had had a soul; proposed to her and was accepted–then three months later, with no date ever set for the wedding and marriage itself not mentioned one time since, and on the very day when he established definitely that he would be able to keep at least some of his land and how much, he approached her and suggested they breed like a couple of dogs together, inventing with fiendish cunning the thing which husbands and fiances have been trying to invent for ten million years: the thing that without harming her or giving her grounds for civil or tribal action would not only blast the little dream-woman out of the dovecote but leave her irrevocably husbanded (and himself, husband or fiance, already safely cuckolded before she can draw breath) with the abstract carcass of outrage and revenge; who said it and was free now, forever more now of threat or meddling from anyone since he had at last eliminated the last member of his late wife’s family, free now: son fled to Texas or California or maybe even South America, daughter doomed to spinsterhood to live until he died, since after that it wouldn’t matter, in that rotting house, caring for him and feeding him, raising chickens and peddling the eggs for the clothes she and Clytie couldn’t make: so that he didn’t even need to be a demon now but just mad impotent old man who had realised at last that his dream of restoring his Sutpen’s Hundred was not only vain but that what he had left of it would never support him and his family and so running his little crossroads store with a stock of plowshares and hame strings and calico and kerosene and cheap beads and ribbons and a clientele of freed niggers and (what is it? the word? white what?–Yes, trash) with Jones for clerk and who knows maybe what delusions of making money out of the store to rebuild the plantation; who had escaped twice now, got himself into it and been freed by the Creditor who set his children to destroying one another before he had posterity, and he decided that maybe he was wrong in being free and so got into it again and then decided that he was wrong in being unfree and so got out of it again–and then turned right around and bought his way back into it with beads and calico and striped candy out of his own showcase and off his shelves?”

— Absalom, Absalom!

Saladin, whose worth was so great that it raised him from humble beginnings to the sultanate of Egypt and brought him many victories over Saracen and Christian kings, had expended the whole of his treasure in various wars and extraordinary acts of munificence, when a certain situation arose for which he required a vast sum of money.

— The Decameron

They talk about belief in God, in the Fatherland, in freedom, in the people, in the revolution; and all these beliefs are just frauds, tricks for their convenience, like medals and money.

— History

But they’ll get no money from me, I know.

— Middlemarch

So how could he possibly even consider giving me money which would, if anything, strengthen the possibility, when he’s crazy about her himself?

— The Brothers Karamazov

And so my client says to himself: ‘If father doesn’t give me that money, it’ll be as if I’d stolen Katerina’s money.’

— The Brothers Karamazov

The truth is, he knew nothing of this man Raffles, or that there were any bad secrets about him; and he thought that Mr. Bulstrode offered him the money because he repented, out of kindness, of having refused it before.

— Middlemarch

The urbane activity with which a man receives money is really marvellous, considering that we so earnestly believe money to be the root of all earthly ills, and that on no account can a monied man enter heaven.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Then, when he is paying her, he realizes he has only useless money, probably Moroccan coins.

— History

But he must have taken the money out of the bank or borrowed it that morning, which meant that he had expected her to stay firm, in spite of the flowers.

— The Golden Notebook

So both his money and his talents are constantly bolstering the forces of crime, supplying them with capital, and raising up a whole army of evil-doing men perpetually at war with society.

— Père Goriot

She saw them, helped them, got involved, and now the whole family’s on her hands; and not patronizingly, not with money, but she herself is helping the boys with Russian in preparation for school, and she’s taken the girl to live with her.

— Anna Karenina

Yes, I could feel the money-anxiety, it was in the air, like a question.

— The Golden Notebook

It may be possible, however, to find a much more obvious explanation for the accused’s excessively emotional attitude toward that money than a predisposition to insanity.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Besides, you know, Mr. Karamazov, even if I had the money, I still wouldn’t give it to you.

— The Brothers Karamazov

‘We’ll do that, Ilyusha, we’ll move as soon as we have saved up a bit of money.’

— The Brothers Karamazov

Then he sent for the Englishman and for the moneylender, and divided the money he had available into payments.

— Anna Karenina

“Arguments about money?”

— The Brothers Karamazov

According to this way of using things, the men richest in money are those who have charge of guarding the gates and walls of a good city.

— Essays

In fact, it was certain Nino worked, because he earned money (not a great deal, to tell the truth); but what his job was exactly remained a confused point (that it involved contraband or the black market was more or less known; but such work constituted only another alarming enigma for Ida).

— History

But then we took her money and spent it, so she couldn’t go back to Petersburg.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Up stairs the hall was dark, but I found the duke’s room, and started to paw around it with my hands; but I recollected it wouldn’t be much like the king to let anybody else take care of that money but his own self; so then I went to his room and began to paw around there.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

I ain’ gwyne to len’ no mo’ money ‘dout I see de security.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

It must be remembered that by “business” Caleb never meant money transactions, but the skilful application of labor.

— Middlemarch

They take their protection money so haughtily you’d think they were doing you a favour.

— Children of Gebelawi

He thought about the way that he enjoyed money and leisure while the wretchedness of others spoilt his happiness.

— Children of Gebelawi

And then he killed his father, but still didn’t pay me the money back.

— The Brothers Karamazov

[The pages were divided down the middle by a neat black line, and the subdivisions headed:]

Source

Money

— The Golden Notebook

Moreover, he was scared of his powers of invective, so much so that in order to placate him, he’d published his portrait in L’Art industriel together with an article praising him to the skies; and being more susceptible to fame than money, at about eight o’clock in came Pellerin, quite out of breath.

— A Sentimental Education
death

Even if all justice today were administered by ecclesiastical courts, the Church would not sentence anyone either to forced labor or to death.

— The Brothers Karamazov

To act as if death did not exist, or to act thinking every minute of death, is perhaps the same thing.

— Zorba the Greek

Even if disease, old age, and death happened to place their simulacra along his way, he didn’t notice them.

— History

In Poland, the obligatory segregation of the Jewish population, already established with the Nazi occupation, is followed by the decree of the death penalty for any Jew caught outside the ghetto.

— History

Drink, ye harpooneers! drink and swear, ye men that man the deathful whaleboat’s bow—Death to Moby Dick!

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Suppose we could raise the life of the people to our level, would death stop hunting us?

— Children of Gebelawi

In battle, I value death not this … and let him not take me cowardly, like poor Joe Gibbins, in scouring his gun.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

A chill passed over him, as if he had been notified that death was approaching.

— The Sound of the Mountain

Moreover, if she had really abandoned herself to the great mass of the sea, deliberately seeking death, we can suppose that the cloak’s weight, increased by the water, would have dragged her to the bottom.

— History

The story begun in Bombay continues in the lowlands of Palanpur, pauses for a night and a day at the stone gate of Bikanir, narrates the death of a blind astrologer in a cesspool in Benares, conspires in the multiform palace at Katmandu, prays and fornicates in the pestilential stench of the Machua bazaar in Calcutta, watches the day being born out of the sea from a scribe’s stool in Madras, watches the evening decline into the sea from a balcony in the state of Travancor, gutters and dies in Hindapur, and close its circle of leagues and years in Bombay again, a few steps from the garden of those “moon-coloured” hounds.

— Ficciones

No, not even with death.

— The Book of Disquiet

‘My dear sir,’ he said, ‘stop trifling with life and death.

— Lolita

He applied to his friend, the redhead: ‘You, listen to me, you, is it true what he said about the man, and how he lost his way and they put him to death?’

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

This woman is the offering Wad Rayyes wants to sacrifice at the edge of the grave, with which to bribe death and so gain a respite of a year or two.

— Season of Migration to the North

If she finished it tonight, if they did go to the Lighthouse after all, it was to be given to the Lighthouse keeper for his little boy, who was threatened with a tuberculous hip; together with a pile of old magazines, and some tobacco, indeed whatever she could find lying about, not really wanted, but only littering the room, to give those poor fellows who must be bored to death sitting all day with nothing to do but polish the lamp and trim the wick and rake about on their scrap of garden, something to amuse them.

— To the Lighthouse

A second letter, this one secret, told me of his death, which Plotina promised to keep hidden as long as possible, thus giving me the advantage of being the first one warned.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

He was mistaken, and that error in calculation was causing his slow death in the besieged citadel of Bethar; the Arab tribes were drawing apart from the Jewish communities; the Parthians remained faithful to the treaties.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

All in all, death is something like marriage.

— Journey to the End of the Night

He did not believe in death generally and especially not in her death, though Lydia Ivanovna had told him and his father had confirmed it, and therefore, even after he was told that she was dead, he looked for her during his walks.

— Anna Karenina

Death, the inevitable end of everything, presented itself to him for the first time with irresistible force.

— Anna Karenina

In reality, when Useppe had seen him appear at the window on Monday afternoon, Davide, you might say, had already entered his death-agony.

— History

He did nothing the next day but ride his horse and himself to death.

— The Red and the Black

His death, for him so rapid, on the contrary was long for Ida, who began to feel it grow after the hour of his burial, at which she had not been present.

— History

Nor is death sad for death will end my sorrow;

Would he I love might live a long tomorrow!

— Metamorphoses

This is the speech—I learned it, easy enough, while he was learning it to the king:

To be, or not to be; that is the bare bodkin

That makes calamity of so long life;

For who would fardels bear, till Birnam Wood do come to Dunsinane,

But that the fear of something after death

Murders the innocent sleep,

Great nature’s second course,

And makes us rather sling the arrows of outrageous fortune

Than fly to others that we know not of.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

The immortality of the race was supposed to make up in some way for each individual death, but it was hardly consoling to me that whole generations of Bithynians would succeed each other to the end of time along the banks of the Sangarius.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

And I had heard of the death of her husband, from an accident consequent on his ill-treatment of a horse.

— Great Expectations

Yet I tell you that upon one particular voyage which I made to the Pacific, among many others, we spoke thirty different ships, every one of which had had a death by a whale, some of them more than one, and three that had each lost a boat’s crew.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

But she had an enormous fear of skeletons and of death.

— History

Hamroush said:

‘We shall fight to the death.’

— Children of Gebelawi

‘By G—, it’s Death!’

— Great Expectations

His mind, however, was not wholly uncultivated; after his death they found in his house a trunk full of mathematical instruments and books untouched by him for twenty years.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

Oh! ye three unsurrendered spires of mine; thou uncracked keel; and only god-bullied hull; thou firm deck, and haughty helm, and Pole-pointed prow,—death-glorious ship! must ye then perish, and without me?

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale