love
money
death
love

He fell deeply in love with her, told her of his love, and tried to persuade her to marry him.

— The Brothers Karamazov

By falling in love with a popish clergy-woman; said Trim.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Far from it: she had often boasted that she knew other boys whom she preferred to myself, that I was a good companion, with whom she was always willing to play, although I was too absent-minded, not attentive enough to the game; indeed, she had often shown signs of apparent coldness towards me which might have shaken my faith that I was for her a person different from the rest, had that faith been founded upon a love that Gilberte felt for me and not, as was the case, upon the love I felt for her, which strengthened its resistance to the assaults of doubt by making it depend entirely on the manner in which I was obliged by an internal compulsion to think of Gilberte.

— In Search of Lost Time

Stepan Arkadyich, who had known for a long time that Levin was in love with his sister-in-law Kitty, smiled almost imperceptibly and his eyes shone merrily.

— Anna Karenina

We traveled very leisurely, having more than a week to reach Wace, Continental Divide, where she passionately desired to see the Ceremonial Dances marking the seasonal opening of Magic Cave, and at least three weeks to reach Elphinstone, gem of a western State where she yearned to climb Red Rock from which a mature screen star had recently jumped to her death after a drunken row with her gigolo.

— Lolita

Didn’t I try to love him, and to love my son when it was no longer possible to love my husband?

— Anna Karenina

Waverley was new to Flora MacIvor; but then she did not fall in love with him.

— Middlemarch

Certainly, of the extent of this love Swann had no direct awareness.

— In Search of Lost Time

At present, I hope I shall be sufficiently understood, in telling the reader, my uncle Toby fell in love:

—Not that the phrase is at all to my liking: for to say a man is fallen in love,—or that he is deeply in love,—or up to the ears in love,—and sometimes even over head and ears in it,—carries an idiomatical kind of implication, that love is a thing below a man:—this is recurring again to Plato’s opinion, which, with all his divinityship,—I hold to be damnable and heretical;—and so much for that.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

The change that has taken place in him cannot weaken his feelings of love for his neighbours; on the contrary, the change that has taken place in him can only increase his love.

— Anna Karenina

In his younger days a man dreams of possessing the heart of the woman he loves; later, the feeling that he possesses a woman’s heart may be enough to make him fall in love with her.

— In Search of Lost Time

“What! can this be love!” she kept asking herself, “could I have fallen in love!

— The Red and the Black

I love myself too.

— The Tin Drum

And maybe your old man was right this time and they did think maybe the war would settle it and they would not have to themselves, or at least maybe Henry hoped it would because maybe your old man was right here too and Bon didn’t care; that since both of the two people who could have given him a father had declined to do it, nothing mattered to him now, revenge or love or all, since he knew now that revenge could not compensate him nor love assuage.

— Absalom, Absalom!

And for pure pleasure, as well as from a sort of chivalrous loyalty, on no matter what pretext I would utter the name of that street until my father, not being, like my mother and grandmother, apprised of my love, would ask me: “But why are you always talking about that street?”

— In Search of Lost Time

Mathilde is farsighted; she sensed right off that this suspicion could ruin him in my estimation; whence, her avowal that it was she who took it upon herself to fall in love with him first….

— The Red and the Black

Nor did anyone know about his love for the victim, for he had always been a taciturn and uncommunicative man and had never had a close friend to whom he might have confided his passion.

— The Brothers Karamazov

As the youngest, she was her father’s favourite, and it seemed to her that his love for her gave him insight.

— Anna Karenina

‘Herbert,’ said I, laying my hand upon his knee, ‘I love—I adore—Estella.’

— Great Expectations

You know I’ll always love you, my pet.

— A Sentimental Education

I’m the first to love him.

— The Brothers Karamazov

No, she assumed that Ulrich knew nothing of the monstrosity of a love-play that was as though on the peaks of the Himalayas, built of love, contempt, fear, and the obligations of the sublime.

— The Man Without Qualities

Oh, but how I’ll love you!

— Père Goriot

‘Some people love an evil spirit without realizing it.’

— Children of Gebelawi

He returned to this other point of view, which was the opposite of the one based on his love and jealousy and to which he resorted at times by a sort of intellectual equity and in order to make allowance for the various probabilities, and tried to judge Odette as though he had not been in love with her, as though she were like any other woman, as though her life (as soon as he was no longer present) had not been different, woven secretly behind his back, hatched against his will.

— In Search of Lost Time

It was, as Paul would explain, ‘obligatory in the times we live in to be in love with as many people as possible.’

— The Golden Notebook

I believed he’d love me, unclean as I am, love me truly, not just like an animal…

— The Brothers Karamazov

So Fenya must have repeated to you the silly message I asked Alyosha to give you—that I’d loved you for one hour but that I was leaving now and would always love someone else.

— The Brothers Karamazov

—But—you love me so much, you want to put me in your pocket.

— Sons and Lovers

How could any one understand Dodo so well as Celia did, or love her so tenderly?

— Middlemarch

Now that you are no longer before me and cannot see my face, and now that I run no risk of appearing soft or ridiculous, I can tell you I love you very deeply.

— Zorba the Greek

Only some time later did he discover that this man was a well-known and very able lawyer, highly respected in his profession, with a harmless love, into the bargain, of a day’s slaughter with the guns, a welcome figure at pub and club and in all places where sportsmen and legal men sat and talked about masculine affairs instead of art and love.

— The Man Without Qualities

When Meleager saw her, in a flash

His heart leapt high (while Heaven opposed) and deep

He drank love’s flame.

— Metamorphoses
money

But she left him roses and fruit and money.

— Sons and Lovers

‘So why are you running around; don’t I earn enough money; I earn enough, don’t I.’

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

He said to himself:

‘We must get hold of some money!’

— A Sentimental Education

But I may also decide not to go anywhere, not to see anyone, to send Kuzma Samsonov back all the money and things he’s given me, and myself become a cleaning woman.

— The Brothers Karamazov

I wish you to know that under no circumstances would I have lowered myself by—under no circumstances would I have given men the chance of saying that I sought money under the pretext of seeking—something else.

— Middlemarch

I made sure of paying the money myself, and I have tried as hard as I could.

— Middlemarch

Money is life.

— Père Goriot

Money brings you everything, even daughters.

— Père Goriot

I sent him there on urgent business, and he’d just gone through my money, lived with some cabaret tart, and now comes back twelve days late.

— Zorba the Greek

He was roused from his daydreams by a voice shouting: ‘My money… my money… Robbery!’

— Children of Gebelawi

Did you give him the money?

— The Brothers Karamazov

———And as far as the hundred pounds went, he would fling it upon the table, guinea by guinea, with that spirited jerk of an honest welcome, which generous souls, and generous souls only, are able to fling down money: but as soon as ever he enter’d upon the odd fifty,—he generally gave a loud Hem!—rubb’d the side of his nose leisurely with the flat part of his fore finger,——inserted his hand cautiously betwixt his head and the cawl of his wig,—look’d at both sides of every guinea, as he parted with it,—and seldom could get to the end of the fifty pounds, without pulling out his handkerchief, and wiping his temples.

— The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

I mean, have you ever stolen someone else’s money straight out of his pocket or purse.

— The Brothers Karamazov

One of them, Zoklot, got into fights with one after another, until he had beaten them all and become chief of the whole alley, making all the others pay him protection money.

— Children of Gebelawi

She had a real talent for it, and she would make dresses for the ladies just to help them out, never asking them for anything in exchange, although if they really insisted on giving her things or money as presents, she would accept them.

— The Brothers Karamazov

“It is lucky to be you,” said the elder woman bitingly, “to have a husband as takes all the worry of the money, and leaves you a free hand.”

— Sons and Lovers

I’ve put away money, only for you to spend.

— Great Expectations

That the money came from Bulstrode would infallibly have been guessed even if there had been no direct evidence of it; for it had beforehand entered into the gossip about Lydgate’s affairs, that neither his father-in-law nor his own family would do anything for him, and direct evidence was furnished not only by a clerk at the Bank, but by innocent Mrs. Bulstrode herself, who mentioned the loan to Mrs. Plymdale, who mentioned it to her daughter-in-law of the house of Toller, who mentioned it generally.

— Middlemarch

I’ll pay back the money I have stolen.

— The Brothers Karamazov

Grandma Henrouille was making a lot of money out of these scrapings of the centuries.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Then the shadow would fade, the wind die away until at last Jones would say, serene, not even triumphant: ‘They mought have kilt us, but they aint whupped us yit, air they?’)—hailed by women and children with pails and baskets, whereupon she or Clytie would go to the store, unlock it, serve the customer, lock the store and return: until she sold the store at last and spent the money for a tombstone. 

— Absalom, Absalom!

I couldn’ manage to k’leck dat money no way; en Balum he couldn’.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

It was because Vatnez had that very day presented her with a long overdue IOU and she’d gone round to Arnoux’s to get some money.

— A Sentimental Education

Nikolai said that he had come to receive the money and, above all, to visit his own nest, to touch the soil, in order to gather strength, as mighty heroes do, for future action.

— Anna Karenina

My second situation was to have money.

— Essays

And I suppose I’m also jealous because of her money, no?

— The Brothers Karamazov

It was this that upset him for a moment when Kitty reminded him about money; but he had no time to think of it.

— Anna Karenina

Other than a proper occupation in the harbour suburb, should a man like Herbert really have to go looking for makeshift ways to earn money?

— The Tin Drum

Maybe she’s come to us without enough money to buy the children candy.

— The Sound of the Mountain

Judith came into town one day and brought him the money, some of it, where she got it from he never knew, unless it was what she had left out of the price of the store which he sold for her; brought the money in with the inscription (except the date of death of course) all written out as you see it, during that three weeks while Clytie was in New Orleans finding the boy to fetch him back though your grandfather of course did not know this, money and inscription not for herself but for him.”

— Absalom, Absalom!

Give me some money!

— A Sentimental Education

‘Well, what about you?’ retorted Arnoux; and with an indulgent smile: ‘I’ll even bet any money that old rogue’s got a room tucked away somewhere to entertain little girlies in!’

— A Sentimental Education

M. de Rênal was very happy; when the fateful moment came to accept the money from him, the sacrifice turned out to be too much for Julien.

— The Red and the Black
death

Approximately thirty feet from the wall Leo marked a point, then placed a wooden stick near the whitewashed section, which I imagine had also been repaired, all this with his left hand, for in his right he held the empty shell, and finally, after interminable searching and measuring, he removed the wooden stick and replaced it with that hollow metallic cylinder, somewhat narrowed at the tip, which had housed a lead kernel till someone tightened his index finger, sought the pressure point, and smoothly, without jerking, issued the lead’s eviction notice and ordered its death-dealing relocation.

— The Tin Drum

But after what you have said, it is my duty to tell you that death from this disease is often sudden.

— Middlemarch

A great joy to live within these walls, they ran me into the ground, I thought I’d committed murder but it was only manslaughter, GBH resulting in death, not so bad, I’d gotten to be a right s.o.b., a ruffian, little better than a vagrant.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

Similarly, in the case of the poor kitchen-maid, was not one’s attention incessantly drawn to her belly by the weight which dragged it down; and in the same way, again, are not the thoughts of the dying often turned towards the practical, painful, obscure, visceral aspect, towards that “seamy side” of death which is, as it happens, the side that death actually presents to them and forces them to feel, and which far more closely resembles a crushing burden, a difficulty in breathing, a destroying thirst, than the abstract idea to which we are accustomed to give the name of Death?

— In Search of Lost Time

“Of death.”

— Zorba the Greek

Only one sweeter end can readily be recalled—the delicious death of an Ohio honey-hunter, who seeking honey in the crotch of a hollow tree, found such exceeding store of it, that leaning too far over, it sucked him in, so that he died embalmed.

— Moby-Dick; or, The Whale

Beautifully because Meyn had done something he hadn’t done for a long time; moved by Herbert’s death, who was about his own age, he had gone back to drinking Machandel, while that same death had silenced me and my drum.

— The Tin Drum

I want only to tell the pure truth, and this truth is: Franz Biberkopf hears Death, he hears this Death, and he hears him singing slowly, like a stammerer, with many repetitions, and also in the manner of a saw, cutting into wood.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

That is the anniversary of the death of Osiris, the god of the dying; along the river piercing cries of lamentation had resounded from all the villages for three days’ time.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

‘What manner of man is this, whom neither old age nor illness, nor fear of the death which he sees so close at hand, nor even the fear of God, before whose judgement he knows he must shortly appear, have managed to turn from his evil ways, or persuade to die any differently from the way he has lived?’

— The Decameron

But I swear by his shade that I would first put on mourning, and then I would go out in public as the widow Sorel; I would send out my own death notices; you may count on that….

— The Red and the Black

Shingo could not remember the anniversary of his sister-in-law’s death.

— The Sound of the Mountain

Bébert’s death hadn’t done me any good in the neighborhood.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Where were they taking them and what death had they prepared?

— Children of Gebelawi

If you should sin yourself and be weighed down until death by your sins or by a single sinful act committed spontaneously, rejoice for the righteous and be happy, for, although you have sinned, they have not.

— The Brothers Karamazov

He did not hear until later of Kitamoto’s death, which occurred during the air raids; and when Tanizaki Eiko came with her introduction, Kitamoto’s wife and children were still in Gifu Prefecture, where they had taken refuge from the raids.

— The Sound of the Mountain

The sudden death of his second wife, who did not live even a year with him, finally settled it all.

— Demons

This is the speech—I learned it, easy enough, while he was learning it to the king:

To be, or not to be; that is the bare bodkin

That makes calamity of so long life;

For who would fardels bear, till Birnam Wood do come to Dunsinane,

But that the fear of something after death

Murders the innocent sleep,

Great nature’s second course,

And makes us rather sling the arrows of outrageous fortune

Than fly to others that we know not of.

— Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

While Commander Sabarmati was at sea on manoeuvres, Lila and Homi were performing certain manoeuvres of their own; while the lion of the seas awaited the death of the then-Admiral, Homi and Lila, too, were making an appointment with the Reaper.

— Midnight's Children

All too soon my little savings book became a friend indeed in time of need, for Death came and carried off Ferdinand Schmuh, along with our work and wages.

— The Tin Drum

“My death!” Grandma Henrouille was shrieking now.

— Journey to the End of the Night

She turns back and howls in the face of grinning Death.

— Berlin Alexanderplatz

I will die in your arms, happier at my death than I ever was in my life.

— The Red and the Black

The appointed punishment for his return to the land that had cast him out being Death, and his case being this aggravated case, he must prepare himself to Die.

— Great Expectations

From this consideration is derived the custom, which we have in wars, of punishing even with death those who obstinately defend a place which by the rules of war cannot be held.

— Essays

All the roughness and grandeur of his character, his Roman virtue, had left him; death loomed at him from a greater height, and seemed less easy.

— The Red and the Black

Lydgate’s opinion was not on the side of promise that this prayer would be fulfilled; and as the day advanced, Bulstrode felt himself getting irritated at the persistent life in this man, whom he would fain have seen sinking into the silence of death: imperious will stirred murderous impulses towards this brute life, over which will, by itself, had no power.

— Middlemarch

‘And it might seem good to leave all this vileness and confusion, other people’s and one’s own, but I’m afraid of death, terribly afraid of death.’

— Anna Karenina

What am I saying! half a company, were it only fifty men, but ready to fight and devoted to the good cause, in life as in death.

— The Red and the Black

But it was during the evil days at Antioch that her presence became indispensable to me, as was always her esteem in after times, an esteem which I kept till her death.

— Memoirs of Hadrian

She told him that on the day of the trial M. de Valenod, having his appointment as prefect in his pocket, had dared to defy M. de Frilair and indulge himself in the pleasure of condemning Julien to death.

— The Red and the Black

She accepted the accident of my death, and not content to acquiesce, she wondered if I was as resigned to it as she was.

— Journey to the End of the Night

Nothing since Phaethon’s fiery death had grieved

So sore the master of the swift-winged steeds.

— Metamorphoses